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221 - 230 of 587 results for: Medicine

FEMGEN 260X: Journeys in Women's Health and Sex and Gender in Medicine (INDE 260)

Sponsored by the Stanford WSDM Center. Course focuses on health research on women and sex differences in medicine, acknowledges the "wisdom" of research and education on sex (e.g. chromosomes, gonads, gonadal hormones) and gender (sociocultural) factors influencing health. Brings alumni to share their professional journeys in the world of Women and Sex Differences in Medicine. Meets Women's Health Scholarly Concentration Requirement.

FEMGEN 444: Graduate Research Seminar: Gender in Science, Medicine, and Engineering (HISTORY 444)

Theory and practice of gender in STEM. 1. "Fix the Numbers of Women" focuses on increasing women's participation; 2. "Fix the Institutions" promotes gender equality in careers through structural change in research organizations; 3. "Fix the Knowledge" or "gendered innovations" stimulates excellence in science and technology by integrating gender analysis into research. Seminar explores harnessing the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

FRENCH 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (ITALIAN 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

FRENCH 219: The Renaissance Body in French Literature and Medicine (FRENCH 319)

If the Renaissance is famous for discovering unknown continents and ancient texts the body too was a new territory of conquest. How did literature respond to the rise of an anatomical gaze in the arts and in medicine and how did it stage the aesthetic religious philosophical and moral issues related to such a promotion or deconstruction of the body? Does literature aim at representing the body or does it use it instead as a ubiquitous signifier for intellectual emotional and political ideas? The locus of desire, pleasure and disease, the body also functioned as a reminder of human mortality and was caught in the web of gender issues, religious controversies and new norms of behavior. Texts from prose fiction (Rabelais) poetry (Scève Ronsard Labé D'Aubigné) essays (Montaigne) and emblem literature. Extra documents include music scores tapestries paintings philosophical and anatomical plates from medical treatises. Taught in English. Visit the Web site: renaissancebodyproject.stanford.edu
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

FRENCH 229: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

FRENCH 319: The Renaissance Body in French Literature and Medicine (FRENCH 219)

If the Renaissance is famous for discovering unknown continents and ancient texts the body too was a new territory of conquest. How did literature respond to the rise of an anatomical gaze in the arts and in medicine and how did it stage the aesthetic religious philosophical and moral issues related to such a promotion or deconstruction of the body? Does literature aim at representing the body or does it use it instead as a ubiquitous signifier for intellectual emotional and political ideas? The locus of desire, pleasure and disease, the body also functioned as a reminder of human mortality and was caught in the web of gender issues, religious controversies and new norms of behavior. Texts from prose fiction (Rabelais) poetry (Scève Ronsard Labé D'Aubigné) essays (Montaigne) and emblem literature. Extra documents include music scores tapestries paintings philosophical and anatomical plates from medical treatises. Taught in English. Visit the Web site: renaissancebodyproject.stanford.edu
Last offered: Winter 2016

FRENCH 343: In Defense of Poetry (ITALIAN 345)

Beginning with the account of the quarrel between philosophy and poetry in Plato's Republic, we will read definitions and defenses of poetry by authors such as Cicero, Horace, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Sidney, Shelley, and Pound, among others. While we will try to historicize these authors' defenses as much as possible, we will also read them from the perspective of contemporary efforts to defend literature and the humanities. Topics of central concern will be the connection between poetry and ethics, the conflict between poetry and the professions of business, law, and medicine, poetry's place in the university, the political role of the poet, questions of poetic language and form, and the relevance of defenses of poetry to literary theory.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

GENE 202: Human Genetics

Utilizes lectures and small group activities to develop a working knowlege of human genetics as applicable to clinical medicine. Basic principles of inheritance, risk assessment, and population genetics are illustrated using examples drawn from diverse areas of medical genetics practice including prenatal, pediatric, adult and cancer genetics. Practical aspects of molecular and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are emphasized. Existing and emerging treatment strategies for single gene disorders are also covered. Prerequisites: basic genetics. Only available to MD and MOM students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

GENE 217: Translational Bioinformatics

(Same as BIOMEDIN 217, CS 275) Analytic, storage, and interpretive methods to optimize the transformation of genetic, genomic, and biological data into diagnostics and therapeutics for medicine. Topics: access and utility of publicly available data sources; types of genome-scale measurements in molecular biology and genomic medicine; analysis of microarray data; analysis of polymorphisms, proteomics, and protein interactions; linking genome-scale data to clinical data and phenotypes; and new questions in biomedicine using bioinformatics. Case studies. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with statistics and biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
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