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551 - 560 of 561 results for: Medicine

STEMREM 299: Directed Reading in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

STRAMGT 321: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch I

This is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from idea to launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations, but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter they will further refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The new course builds on a predecessor course S356 "Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities" and encapsulates new and important research and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is primarily learning by doing (LBD) through a structured process and supported by relevant lectures. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by experienced mentors and review by peers. Field research as well as prototype product development are integral to the course. Since admittance to S321/S322 is by team and the quality of their idea, team formation takes place during the autumn quarter. Informal student mixers and seminars will be held to facilitate team formation and idea generation. Each team of 3-4 students should preferably consist of 1 or more MSx students and graduate students from the MBA program or other Schools - Engineering, Medicine, Law, Science, Education - to bring diversity and depth to the team. The application-selection process is described on the S321/S322 website.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

STRAMGT 322: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch II

This is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from idea to launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations, but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter they will further refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The new course builds on a predecessor course S356 "Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities" and encapsulates new and important research and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is primarily learning by doing (LBD) through a structured process and supported by relevant lectures. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by experienced mentors and review by peers. Field research as well as prototype product development are integral to the course. Since admittance to S321/S322 is by team and the quality of their idea, team formation takes place during the autumn quarter. Informal student mixers and seminars will be held to facilitate team formation and idea generation. Each team of 3-4 students should preferably consist of 1 or more MSx students and graduate students from the MBA program or other Schools - Engineering, Medicine, Law, Science, Education - to bring diversity and depth to the team. The application-selection process is described on the S321/S322 website.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 511: Protecting Ideas

At the beginning and usually at the heart of every new business is an idea. Around that core idea talent is assembled, technology is developed, investors are attracted, capital is deployed, business models are evolved, and products and services are created and sold. But what happens if a business'€™ core idea turns out not to be protectable, and can be freely used by competitors, many of whom may have significantly greater resources, pricing power and other competitive advantages? Or conversely, how do you recognize opportunities to enter markets in which incumbent barriers to entry are, from an IP standpoint, weak or illusory? Using hypotheticals premised on reported cases, this course explores the business impact and implications of the rapidly-changing and often confusing law around how to protect what are often the most valuable core assets of a business. In particular, and with the assistance of business executives from impacted companies and institutions, the Supreme Court'€™s recent decisions in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International, Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, and Mayo v. Prometheus will be discussed, and their implications for business models and both offensive and defensive strategy in fields such as software development, e-commerce, personalized medicine and medical diagnostics will be explored.nnIt is the objective of this course to help students to recognize and think critically about how the ability or inability to protect, or the scope of the protection available for, new ideas impacts everything from the funding and viability of a new business to the business model and IP strategy selected to advance it.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Abramson, R. (PI)

STS 103Q: Reading and Writing Poetry about Science

Preference to sophomores. Students will study recent poetry inspired by the phenomena and history of the sciences in order to write such poems themselves. These poems bring sensuous human experience to bear on biology, ecology, astronomy, physics, earth science, and medicine, as well as on technological advances and calamities. Poets such as Linda Bierds, Mark Doty, Albert Goldbarth, Sarah Lindsay, W.S. Merwin, Adrienne Rich, Pattiann Rogers, Tracy K. Smith, Arthur Sze, and C. K. Williams. Grounding in poetics, research in individually chosen areas of science, weekly analytical and creative writing. Fulfills the Creative Expression requirement. Enrollment limited to 12.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

SURG 232: Social Emergency Medicine and Service Learning

Focus on understanding the social determinants of health and exploring the relationship between emergency medicine and public health affecting the Emergency Department patient population by: 1) Discussion and critique of relevant literature; 2) Learning about community resources for patient's social needs; 3) Shadowing ED physicians. Topics include how public health initiatives can improve access to hospital and community resources, and how patients receive care in a busy, fast-paced environment. 2 Units. Service learning component (Additional 1 Unit of Credit): Requires prerequisite of Med 157 Community Health Course, a 3-quarter commitment, personal statement and faculty approval. Students conduct screening and intervention for ED patients; Service Learning option requires prerequisite of Med 157 Community Health course, and enrolling for 3 units.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | Repeatable for credit

SURG 253: Topics in Simulation of Human Physiology & Anatomical Systems (CME 520)

Biweekly interdisciplinary lecture series on the development of computational tools for modeling and simulation of human physiological and anatomical systems. Lectures by instructors and guest speakers on topics such as surgical simulation, anatomical & surgical Modeling, neurological Systems, and biomedical models of human movement. Group discussions, team based assignments, and project work.nPrerequisite: Medical students, residents or fellows from school of medicine, and computationally oriented students with a strong interest to explore computational and mathematical methods related to the health sciences.
| Repeatable for credit

SURG 298: Procedure-Based Specialty Capstone Course

Designed for graduating medical students entering a procedure-based internship or residency (e.g. general surgery, surgical sub-specialties, obstetrics-gynecology, anesthesia, and emergency medicine). Prepares students with practical, high-yield clinical and procedural skills. Clinical skills include fielding common calls regarding surgical patients, obtaining informed consent, completing operative dictations, discharging patients, writing prescriptions, running trauma surveys, and interpreting surgically relevant radiology studies. The hands-on portion of the course covers basic open and laparoscopic surgical skills utilizing bench models, laparoscopic box trainers, and full cadaveric simulations. Prerequisite: graduating medical student.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Lau, J. (PI)

THINK 48: Reading the Body: How Medicine and Culture Define the Self

How have our perceptions of what is considered normal/abnormal; beautiful/ugly; infected/uninfected changed over time? How do these changing medical and cultural representations of the body reflect larger societal shifts? How does illness change our perceptions of our bodies and our identities? Viewed through the lens of medicine, the body is a text that offers clues to health and illness, yet clinical readings are never entirely objective. Culture informs and distorts how we discern, accept, reject, and analyze our bodies. Looking at literary, medical, ethical, and anthropological texts, we ask how representations of the body affects the way we experience illness, embody gender and racial identities, and understand our rights (or lack of rights) to control our own bodies. We will critically examine our perceptions about the body and debate some of the most complex and sensitive issues surrounding the body, from the ethics of medical research trials to end of life decisions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-ED

URBANST 122: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER
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