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511 - 520 of 561 results for: Medicine

SOC 105D: Sociology of Health and Illness

This course examines the social causes and context of health, illness, and health care in the United States. Who stays healthy and who gets sick? How do individuals experience and make sense of illness? How docontextual factors (including socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, culture, social networks, and hospital quality) shape health and health care? What constitutes quality medical care and who gets it? To what degree do the spaces we inhabit and the relationships we form shape our health? What avenues exist for improving health care and reducing health disparities?In examining these questions, we will consider how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians address them in research and in the field. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine. nBy the end of the course, students will: 1) have insight into the various ways of defining and measuring health, including mortality, morbidity, physical functioning, and quality of life; 2) understand how a person¿s socio-demographic characteristics influence his or her health, including his or her ability to access resources vital to maintaining health and receiving treatment; 3) understand how researchersemploy theory and make causal inferences based on observational and experimental data; 4) comprehendhow patients and practitioners understand health and illness and their roles in the health care process; and 5) understand the role of medical care in the distribution of health outcomes across the population.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

SOC 114: Economic Sociology (SOC 214)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 214: Economic Sociology (SOC 114)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

SOMGEN 130: Sexual Diversity and Function Across Medical Disciplines (FEMGEN 230X)

(Same as SOMGEN 230/ FEMGEN 230). Focus is on development of personal and professional skills to interact with people across the diverse range of human sexuality, from childhood (pediatric) to older ages (geriatric), with consideration of gender identity, sexual orientation, sociocultural (predominantly U.S., not global) and religious values, and selected medical issues (e.g. hormonal therapy, disabilities, e.g. spinal cord injury, etc. with discussion of sexual taboos and unusual sexual practices that you might encounter in a general medical setting. For the additional unit, students will undertake an additional weekly activity (e.g., shadowing in a clinic) approved by the instructor and submit a weekly written reflection about that activity.

SOMGEN 140: Preventive Medicine

(Same as CHPR 240) Features the research of faculty in the Stanford Prevention Research Center and focuses on key health issues over the life course (prenatal through childhood, young to middle-aged, older and elderly adults). Topics include chronic disease (global and U.S.) epidemiology; application of behavioral science to risk reduction; nutrition; weight management; physical activity; stopping smoking; public health; community health and community-based prevention; national prevention strategy; applying communication technology to health promotion.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

SOMGEN 202: Authoring Wikipedia Medicine Articles

Course focuses on how to author and edit evidence-based systematic review-style articles for Wikipedia. Topics to include: appraising importance, quality and reliability of Wikipedia medicine article, learning WikiProject Medicine style guidelines, identifying clinical questions and applying relevant evidence to answering them, using secondary literature (systematic reviews, meta-analyses, textbooks, practice guidelines) to edit a Wikipedia Medicine article, publishing Wikipedia Medicine articles in open-access journals. Enrollment limited to MD students in their 4th year.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3

SOMGEN 203: Literature and Writing for Military Affiliated Students

Focus is on military literature and workshopping students' writing about their military experiences. Texts and guest faculty and writers vary each quarter. Dinner and course materials provided free for all students.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

SOMGEN 204: Mobile Health Without Borders

Overview of innovations in mobile health, global health, and entrepreneurship. Each class features lectures from multiple world leaders on themes, challenges, opportunities in m-health. Content delivered in hybrid in-person seminar and webinar format connecting participants from around the world in class discussions and assignments.

SOMGEN 206: Global Medical Issues Affecting Women (FEMGEN 206)

This course probes the principal issues affecting women and girls medically around the world. Through interactive discussions, guest lectures, case studies, and academic readings, students become acquainted with the most critical challenges to women¿s health globally, and use selected analytical tools to assess how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. Topics include women¿s cancer, birth control, infertility, female genital mutilation, midwifery, obstetric fistula, breastfeeding, violence against women, and women's representation in biomedical research. The aim is to cultivate in students a nuanced appreciation of women¿s unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Westphal, L. (PI)

SOMGEN 207: Theories of Change in Global Health

Open to graduate students studying in any discipline whose research work or interest engages global health. Upper-class undergraduates who have completed at least one of the prerequisite courses and who are willing to commit the preparatory time for a graduate level seminar class are welcome. The course undertakes a critical assessment of how different academic disciplines frame global health problems and recommend pathways toward improvements. Focuses on evaluating examples of both success and failure of different theories of change in specific global health implementations. Prerequisites: ECON 118, CEE 265D, HUMBIO 129S or HUMBIO 124C.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)
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