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41 - 50 of 561 results for: Medicine

BIO 4N: Peopleomics: The science and ethics of personalized genomic medicine

Exploration of the new field of personalized genomic medicine. Personalized medicine is based on the idea that each person's unique genome sequence can be used to predict risk of acquiring specific diseases, and to make more informed medical choices. The science behind these approaches; where they are heading in the future; and the ethical implications such technology presents. Lectures augmented with hands-on experience in exploring and analyzing a real person's genome.
| UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

BIO 14: Bio-logging and Bio-telemetry

Bio-logging is a rapidly growing discipline that includes diverse fields such as consumer electronics, medicine, and marine biology. The use of animal-attached digital tags is a powerful approach to study the movement and ecology of individuals over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. This course is an introduction to bio-logging methods and analysis. Using whales as a model system, students will learn how use multi-sensor tags to study behavioral biomechanics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

BIO 109B: The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine (BIOC 109B)

Continuation of 109A/209A. Genetic drift: the path of human predecessors out of Africa to Europe and then either through Asia to Australia or through northern Russia to Alaska down to the W. Coast of the Americas. Support for this idea through the histocompatibility genes and genetic sequences that predispose people to diseases. Guest lectures from academia and pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 112: Human Physiology (HUMBIO 133)

Human physiology will be examined by organ systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine. Molecular and cell biology and signaling principles that underlie organ development, pathophysiology and opportunities for regenerative medicine are discussed, as well as integrative control mechanisms and fetal development. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: Kao, P. (PI)

BIO 168: Explorations in Stem Cell Biology

A discussion-based course for advanced undergraduates. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to key topics in stem cell biology and foster the development of strong scientific writing skills. We will review and discuss some landmark and current primary literature in the stem cell field. Topics will include embryonic and adult stem cells, cellular reprogramming and stem cells in disease and regenerative medicine. Students will present a current research paper in their preferred stem cell topic area and compose a novel research proposal. Prerequisites: Biology or Human Biology core. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

BIO 174: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 274: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

BIOC 109B: The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine (BIO 109B)

Continuation of 109A/209A. Genetic drift: the path of human predecessors out of Africa to Europe and then either through Asia to Australia or through northern Russia to Alaska down to the W. Coast of the Americas. Support for this idea through the histocompatibility genes and genetic sequences that predispose people to diseases. Guest lectures from academia and pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOC 118Q: Genomics and Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Knowledge gained from sequencing human genomes and implications for medicine and biomedical research. Novel diagnoses and treatment of diseases, including stem cells, gene therapy and rational drug design. Personal genomics and how it is used to improve health and well being. Social and ethical implications of genetic information such as privacy, discrimination and insurability. Course Webpage: http://biochem118.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Brutlag, D. (PI)
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