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211 - 220 of 561 results for: Medicine

FRENCH 319: The Renaissance Body in French Literature and Medicine (FRENCH 219)

If the Renaissance is famous for discovering unknown continents and ancient texts the body too was a new territory of conquest. How did literature respond to the rise of an anatomical gaze in the arts and in medicine and how did it stage the aesthetic religious philosophical and moral issues related to such a promotion or deconstruction of the body? Does literature aim at representing the body or does it use it instead as a ubiquitous signifier for intellectual emotional and political ideas? The locus of desire, pleasure and disease, the body also functioned as a reminder of human mortality and was caught in the web of gender issues, religious controversies and new norms of behavior. Texts from prose fiction (Rabelais) poetry (Scève Ronsard Labé D'Aubigné) essays (Montaigne) and emblem literature. Extra documents include music scores tapestries paintings philosophical and anatomical plates from medical treatises. Taught in English. Visit the Web site: renaissancebodyproject.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)

FRENCH 343: In Defense of Poetry (ITALIAN 345)

Beginning with the account of the quarrel between philosophy and poetry in Plato's Republic, we will read definitions and defenses of poetry by authors such as Cicero, Horace, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Sidney, Shelley, and Pound, among others. While we will try to historicize these authors' defenses as much as possible, we will also read them from the perspective of contemporary efforts to defend literature and the humanities. Topics of central concern will be the connection between poetry and ethics, the conflict between poetry and the professions of business, law, and medicine, poetry's place in the university, the political role of the poet, questions of poetic language and form, and the relevance of defenses of poetry to literary theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Lummus, D. (PI)

GENE 202: Human Genetics

Utilizes lectures and small group activities to develop a working knowlege of human genetics as applicable to clinical medicine. Basic principles of inheritance, risk assessment, and population genetics are illustrated using examples drawn from diverse areas of medical genetics practice including prenatal, pediatric, adult and cancer genetics. Practical aspects of molecular and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are emphasized. Existing and emerging treatment strategies for single gene disorders are also covered. Prerequisites: basic genetics. Only available to MD and MOM students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

GENE 210: Genomics and Personalized Medicine (DBIO 220)

Principles of genetics underlying associations between genetic variants and disease susceptibility and drug response. Topics include: genetic and environmental risk factors for complex genetic disorders; design and interpretation of genome-wide association studies; pharmacogenetics; full genome sequencing for disease gene discovery; population structure and genetic ancestry; use of personal genetic information in clinical medicine; ethical, legal, and social issues with personal genetic testing. Hands-on workshop making use of personal or publicly available genetic data. Prerequisite: GENE 202, Gene 205 or BIOS 200.
Last offered: Spring 2015

GENE 217: Translational Bioinformatics

(Same as BIOMEDIN 217, CS 275) Analytic, storage, and interpretive methods to optimize the transformation of genetic, genomic, and biological data into diagnostics and therapeutics for medicine. Topics: access and utility of publicly available data sources; types of genome-scale measurements in molecular biology and genomic medicine; analysis of microarray data; analysis of polymorphisms, proteomics, and protein interactions; linking genome-scale data to clinical data and phenotypes; and new questions in biomedicine using bioinformatics. Case studies. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with statistics and biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

GENE 286C: Advanced Genetic Counseling Seminar

Continuation of 286A/B. For genetic counseling students only. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic counseling cases are discussed through presentation of cases that students have seen throughout their training. Professional development topics including: the expanding roles of genetic counselors; billing, reimbursement, and licensing; the role of genetic counseling in the changing healthcare system; the incorporation of genetics into all areas of medicine and public health; and implications of direct-to-consumer genetic testing. Prerequisites: GENE 285 A,B,C and 276.
Last offered: Spring 2011

GERMAN 128N: Medicine, Modernism, and Mysticism in Thomas Mann's the Magic Mountain

Published in 1924, The Magic Mountain is a novel of education, tracing the intellectual growth of a budding engineer through a maze of intellectual encounters during a seven- year sojourn in a sanatorium set high in the Swiss Alps. It engages with the key themes of modernism: the relativity of time, the impact of psychoanalysis, the power of myth, and an extended dispute between an optimistic belief in progress and a pessimistic vision of human nature. Through its detailed discussion of disease (tuberculosis), this remarkable text connects the study of medicine to the humanities. There will be an exploration of this rich and profound novel both as a document of early twentieth-century Europe and as a commentary on the possibilities of education that are urgent for liberal arts education today. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

HISTORY 12: Medicine and Disease in the Ancient World

(Same as HISTORY 112. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 112.) This course explores medicine and disease through case studies from civilizations of the ancient world such as Egypt, Greece, and Peru. We will discuss how these cultures conceptualized disease, and in turn, how they contended with illnesses. Lectures will address different forms of illness through medical texts, art, and human remains. Weekly discussion will incorporate evidence from these sources to explore both their potential and their limitations.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

HISTORY 31: Leonardo's World: Science, Technology, and Art in the Renaissance (HISTORY 131)

What did Leonardo actually know? How did he acquire that knowledge? Explores Leonardo's interests and accomplishments in such fields as painting, architecture, engineering, physics, mathematics, geology, anatomy, and physiology, and more generally the nature of Renaissance science, art, and technology. Considers the nrelationship between the society of fifteenth century Italy and the work of the man nfrom Vinci: why did this world produce a Leonardo? How might we use him to understand creativity, innovation, and invention in the Renaissance and beyond? What was his legacy and how did he become a myth? Designed both for students interested in the history of science, medicine, and technology and for students interested in the history and art of Renaissance Italy.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Brege, B. (PI)

HISTORY 40: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 140. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)
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