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171 - 180 of 561 results for: Medicine

EMED 398W: Clinical Elective in Emergency Medicine

Terms: Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 113A: Desire, Identity, Modernity

While drawing on classic work in modern queer studies, the course will focus on the role which Renaissance discourses of desire continue to play in our negotiations of homo/erotic subjectivity, identity politics, and sexual and gender difference. We will study Renaissance queerness in relation to the classical tradition on the one hand and the contemporary discourses of religion, medicine, law, and politics on the other. nReadings include diverse genres, from plays and poems to essays, dialogues, letters, etc. Both major and minor authors will be represented"
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Lupic, I. (PI)

ENGR 155C: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (CME 106)

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR

ETHICSOC 133: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER

ETHICSOC 301: Conflicts, Ethics, and the Academy

(Same as LAW 684) This course looks at conflicts of interest and ethical issues as they arise within academic work. The participants will be drawn from schools and departments across the University so that the discussion will prompt different examples of, and perspectives on, the issues we discuss. Topics will include the conflicts that arise from sponsored research, including choices of topics, shaping of conclusions, and nondisclosure agreements; issues of informed consent with respect to human subjects research, and the special issues raised by research conducted outside the United States; peer review, co-authorship, and other policies connected to scholarly publication; and the ethics of the classroom and conflicts of interest implicating professor-student relationships. Representative readings will include Marcia Angell's work, Drug Companies and Doctors: A Story of Corruption, N.Y. Rev. Books, Jan. 15, 2009, and Is Academic Medicine for Sale? 342 N. Engl. J. Med. 1516 (2000) (and responses); William R. Freudenburg, Seeding Science, Courting Conclusions: Reexamining the Intersection of Science, Corporate Cash, and the Law, 20 Sociological Forum 3 (2005); Max Weber, Science as a Vocation; legal cases; and conflict-of-interest policies adopted by various universities and professional organizations. The course will include an informal dinner at the end of each session. The goal of the course is to have students across disciplines think about the ethical issues they will confront in an academic or research career. Non-law students should enroll in ETHICSOC 301.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3

FAMMED 199: Undergraduate Directed Reading and Research in Family and Community Medicine

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

FAMMED 210: The Healer's Art

Explores the human dimensions of medicine, creating a firm foundation for meeting the challenging demands of medical training and practice. Based on curriculum developed by Dr. Rachel Naomi Remen at UCSF . (For details/evaluations see http://ishiprograms.org/programs-medical_educators.html). Medical students and faculty participate together in an innovative discovery model process that enables an in-depth sharing of experience, beliefs, aspirations and personal truths. Topics include deep listening, presence, acceptance, loss, grief, healing, relationship, encounters with awe and mystery, finding meaning, service, and self-care practices. No papers/exams. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

FAMMED 213: Medical Tai Chi

Tai chi is a recognized form of complimentary and alternative medicine. Class is intended to promote student health and well-being and to decrease stress, depression, and anxiety through tai chi practice. Course focuses on weekly practice and analysis of the literature/research regarding health benefits of tai chi.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Kane, B. (PI)

FAMMED 219: Mind-Body Medicine

A small group (8-10) of medical students experientially exploring of the interconnections among human capacities such as thought, emotion, belief, attitudes, and physical health. Review and practice of specific skills (including mindfulness exercises, meditation, imagery, visualization, body awareness, autogenics, and biofeedback) to enhance self-awareness, self-expression, and stress management. Readings relevant to mind-body medicine made available. Anticipated benefits to class participants include discovering and mobilizing their capacity to participate in valuable and proven methods of self knowledge and stress reduction, while dealing with the frustrations and alienation that many students experience in medical school and beyond.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1

FAMMED 241: Assistantship in Family and Community Medicine

An in-depth experience with a family physician preceptor following the first year of the pre-clinical curriculum. The student applies during the first year to participate in the summer following completion. Application is through the Center for Family and Community Medicine (avjohn@stanford.edu). Placements with family physicians' practices throughout California.
Last offered: Autumn 2012
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