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151 - 160 of 561 results for: Medicine

EMED 210B: Managing Emergencies: What Every Doctor Should Know (High Risk Chief Complaints)

Students learn management of various emergent and traumatic patient presentations. Some topics include advanced airway, trauma, burns, poisoning, and stroke. Key skills and common pitfalls in practice discussed. Providers completing Surg 210A and B will be better prepared to respond effectively with a challenging and urgent case. Class meets online.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Walker, R. (PI)

EMED 211A: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 111A)

Basics of life support outside the hospital setting. Topics include emergency patient assessments for cardiac, respiratory, and neurological emergencies, as well as readiness training for emergencies on and off campus. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Students taking the class for 4 units complete additional FEMA training and additional clinical rotations. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensure exam. Freshmen and Sophomores are highly encouraged to apply. Prerequisites: application (see http://surg211.stanford.edu), and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

EMED 211B: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 111B)

Continuation of 111A/211A. Approach to traumatic injuries. Topics include head, neck, and trunk injuries, bleeding and shock, burn emergencies, and environmental emergencies. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Students taking the class for 4 units complete additional online FEMA training and additional clinical rotations. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensure exam. Prerequisites: 111A/211A, CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

EMED 211C: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 111C)

Continuation of 111B/211B. Special topics in EMS. Topics include pediatric, obstetric, and gynecologic emergencies, EMS operations, mass casualty incidents, and assault. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Students taking the class for 4 units complete additional online FEMA training and additional clinical rotations. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT certification exam. Prerequisites: 111B/211B, CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

EMED 212A: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 112A)

Ongoing training for current EMS providers. Students practice BLS assessments and medical care through simulated patient encounters. Topics include airway and stroke management, abdominal emergencies, prehospital pharmacology, and teaching skills. Students taking the course for 3 units also serve as teaching assistants for Surgery 111, the Stanford EMT training course. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT Certification course), CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
| Repeatable for credit

EMED 212B: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 112B)

Ongoing training for current EMS providers. Students practice BLS assessments and medical care through simulated patient encounters. Topics include assessment and treatment of the undifferentiated trauma patient (including airway management, monitoring, and evaluation) and prehospital care in nontraditional locations. Students taking the course for 3 units also serve as teaching assistants for Surgery 111, the Stanford EMT training course. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT Certification course), CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 212C: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 112C)

Ongoing training for current EMS providers. Students practice BLS assessments and medical care through simulated patient encounters. Topics include mass casualty incidents, assaults, and pediatric emergencies.Expanded scope topics may be included - ACLS, ultrasound, and suturing. Students taking the course for 3 units also serve as teaching assistants for Surgery 111, the Stanford EMT training course. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT Certification course), CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 217: Critical Cases: Think Like an Experienced Physician

Focus is on the ability to find current, accurate information, and the ability to interpret and translate that information into clinical decisions the most important skill in medicine. Work in small teams to refine essential skills to excel on the wards through case-based learning. Topics include traumatic injuries, altered mental status, severe inefections and other critical Emergency Medicine cases. Students develop knowledge of steps critical to care for these patients while refining skills in diagnostic reasoning, interpreting medical literature, and team-based medical care.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Lippert, S. (PI)

EMED 220: Emergency Medicine: Introduction

An introduction to the specialty of emergency medicine, including the emergency stabilization of patients in both the pre-hospital phase and in the emergency department. The course will include both lectures and hands on practical sessions. Topics consist of management of trauma patients and common medical emergencies, with hands on sessions including how to manage airway emergencies and suturing. 2 units includes two four-hour emergency department shadow shifts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2

EMED 222: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response (PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 2 unit option for once weekly attendance (Wed only); 4 unit option for twice weekly attendance (Mon and Wed); 1 additional units (for a maximum of 5 units total) for a research paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)
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