2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

131 - 140 of 561 results for: Medicine

EE 169: Introduction to Bioimaging

Bioimaging is important for both clinical medicine, and medical research. This course will provide a introduction to several of the major imaging modalities, using a signal processing perspective. The course will start with an introduction to multi-dimensional Fourier transforms, and image quality metrics. It will then study projection imaging systems (projection X-Ray), backprojection based systems (CT, PET, and SPECT), systems that use beam forming (ultrasound), and systems that use Fourier encoding (MRI). Prerequisites: EE102A, EE102B
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EE 202: Electrical Engineering in Biology and Medicine

Open to all. Primarily biological in nature, introduction to the physiological and anatomic aspects of medical instrumentation. Areas include patient monitoring, imaging, medical transducers, the unique aspects of medical electronic systems, the socio-economic impact of technology on medical care, and the constraints unique to medicine. Prerequisite: familiarity with circuit instrumentation techniques as in 101B.
Last offered: Spring 2013

EE 331: Biophotonics: Light in Medicine and Biology

Current topics and trends in the use of light in medicine and for advanced microscopy. Course begins with a review of relevant optical principles (basic physics required). Key topics include: light-tissue interactions; sensing and spectroscopy; contrast-enhanced imaging; super-resolution and label-free microscopy; medical applications of light for diagnostics, in-vivo imaging, and therapy; nanophotonics and array technologies. Open to non-majors; programming experience (Matlab and/or C) required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EE 369A: Medical Imaging Systems I

Imaging internal structures within the body using high-energy radiation studied from a systems viewpoint. Modalities covered: x-ray, computed tomography, and nuclear medicine. Analysis of existing and proposed systems in terms of resolution, frequency response, detection sensitivity, noise, and potential for improved diagnosis. Prerequisite: EE 261
Last offered: Winter 2015

EE 372: Data Science for High Throughput Sequencing

Extraordinary advances in sequencing technology in the past decade have revolutionized biology and medicine. Many high-throughput sequencing based assays have been designed to make various biological measurements of interest. This course explores the various computational and data science problems that arises from processing, managing and performing predictive analytics on this high throughput sequencing data. Specific problems we will study include genome assembly, haplotype phasing, RNA-Seq assembly, RNA-Seq quantification, single cell RNA-seq analysis, multi-omics analysis,nand genome compression. We attack these problems through a combination of tools from information theory, combinatorial algorithms, machine learning and signal processing. Through this course, the student will also get familiar with various software tools developed for the analysis of real sequencing data. Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of probability at the level of EE 178. Some programming experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

EMED 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C, HUMBIO 178T)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

EMED 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

EMED 110: Basic Cardiac Life Support for Undergraduates

Preference to undergraduates. Teaches one- and two-rescuer adult CPR and management of an obstructed airway using the American CPR model. Does not satisfy MD student BCLS requirement; MD students take Surgery 201.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Lipman, G. (PI)

EMED 111A: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211A)

Basics of life support outside the hospital setting. Topics include emergency patient assessments for cardiac, respiratory, and neurological emergencies, as well as readiness training for emergencies on and off campus. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Students taking the class for 4 units complete additional FEMA training and additional clinical rotations. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensure exam. Freshmen and Sophomores are highly encouraged to apply. Prerequisites: application (see http://surg211.stanford.edu), and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

EMED 111B: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211B)

Continuation of 111A/211A. Approach to traumatic injuries. Topics include head, neck, and trunk injuries, bleeding and shock, burn emergencies, and environmental emergencies. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Students taking the class for 4 units complete additional online FEMA training and additional clinical rotations. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensure exam. Prerequisites: 111A/211A, CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints