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781 - 790 of 802 results for: Medicine

STRAMGT 321: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch I

S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. more »
S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The course builds on important research, successes, and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is through a structured process of relevant mini-lectures, exercises and active in-depth team learning by doing (LBD). Extensive field research and prototype product development are integral to the course. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by their assigned experienced mentors, experts, and review by peers. Informal student meetings/mixers will be held in the autumn quarter to further facilitate the formation of teams and assist in idea generation. The application process for S321/322,-Create A New Venture: from Idea to Launch- is described on the course website.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 322: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch II

S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. more »
S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The course builds on important research, successes, and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is through a structured process of relevant mini-lectures, exercises and active in-depth team learning by doing (LBD). Extensive field research and prototype product development are integral to the course. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by their assigned experienced mentors, experts, and review by peers. Informal student meetings/mixers will be held in the autumn quarter to further facilitate the formation of teams and assist in idea generation. The application process for S321/322,¿Create A New Venture: from Idea to Launch¿ is described on the course website.
Last offered: Spring 2020

STS 51A: Race in Science (AFRICAAM 51A, CEE 151A, COMM 51A, CSRE 51A, HUMBIO 71A)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Fall quarter focuses on science. What is the science of race and racism? How does race affect scientific work? Weekly guest speakers will address such issues as the psychology and anthropology of race and racism; how race, language, and culture affect education; race in environmental science and environmental justice; the science of reducing police violence; and the role of race in genomic research. Talks will take a variety of forms, from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

STS 51B: Race in Technology (AFRICAAM 51B, BIOE 91B, CEE 151B, COMM 51B, CSRE 51B, HUMBIO 71B)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Winter quarter focuses on technology. How do race and racism affect the design and social impact of technology, broadly defined? Can new or different technology help to reduce racial bias? Invited speakers will address the role of race in such issues as energy infrastructure, nuclear arms control, algorithmic accountability, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology. Talks will take a variety of forms, ranging from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

STS 51C: Race in Medicine (AFRICAAM 51C, BIOE 91C, CEE 151C, CSRE 51C, HUMBIO 71C)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Spring quarter focuses on medicine. How do race and racism affect medical research and medical care? What accounts for health disparities among racial groups? What are the history, ethics, legal, and social issues surrounding racialized medical experiments and treatments? Invited speakers will address these and other issues. Talks will take a variety of forms: conversations, interviews, panels, and others. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

STS 123: Making of a Nuclear World: History, Politics, and Culture

Nuclear technology has shaped our world through its various applications (e.g., weapons, energy production, medicine) and accidents and disasters (e.g., Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, Fukushima). This course will examine the development of nuclear technology and its consequences to politics and culture at the global, national, regional and local levels from interdisciplinary perspectives. Some of the key questions addressed are: How did different countries and communities experience and respond to the 1945 bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki? How did such experiences affect the later development of the technology in different national contexts? How have nuclear tests and disasters change the ways in which risks are understood and managed globally and locally? What kinds of political activism, international arrangements, and cultural tropes and imageries emerged in response to nuclear technology? We explore these questions through key works and recent studies in history, anthropology, sociology, and science and technology studies, as well as through films and literature.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

STS 200U: The Age of Plague: Medicine and Society, 1300-1750 (HISTORY 234P)

(Undergraduates, enroll in 234P. Graduates, enroll in 334P) The arrival of plague in Eurasia in 1347-51 affected many late medieval and early modern societies. It transformed their understanding of disease, raised questions about the efficacy of medical knowledge, and inspired new notions of public health. This class explores the history of medicine in the medieval Islamic and European worlds. Changing ideas about the body, the roles of different healers and religion in healing, the growth of hospitals and universities, and the evolution of medical theory and practice will be discussed. How did medicine and society change in the age of plague?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Findlen, P. (PI)

SURG 52Q: Becoming whatever you want to be: lessons learned from a stem cell

Stem cells are extreme: they are the most powerful cells in our body and yet they are unimaginably scarce; they exist in nearly every tissue but actually locating them is enormously challenging. We believe that stem cells have the potential to transform the way we practice medicine, while at the same time their potential application to human disease continues to spark political debates around the world. My laboratory at Stanford works on this remarkable cell, and we believe that they hold answers to some of the pressing questions about the potential for tissue healing and regeneration in our bodies. Come join us in this conversation about stem cells, and both the hype and hope that surrounds their application to medical practice.While we will be focusing on the human body, we encourage participation from those students whose fields of interest fall well outside HumBio. Engineers, artists, historians, writers, economists--all will find intersections between the course subject matter, an more »
Stem cells are extreme: they are the most powerful cells in our body and yet they are unimaginably scarce; they exist in nearly every tissue but actually locating them is enormously challenging. We believe that stem cells have the potential to transform the way we practice medicine, while at the same time their potential application to human disease continues to spark political debates around the world. My laboratory at Stanford works on this remarkable cell, and we believe that they hold answers to some of the pressing questions about the potential for tissue healing and regeneration in our bodies. Come join us in this conversation about stem cells, and both the hype and hope that surrounds their application to medical practice.While we will be focusing on the human body, we encourage participation from those students whose fields of interest fall well outside HumBio. Engineers, artists, historians, writers, economists--all will find intersections between the course subject matter, and their own interests. In this virtual class, we¿ll be taking advantage of a number of online tools including Zoom, Canvas, and Slack. Group work will figure prominently into this course, and we¿ll discuss and agree upon team charters to facilitate those collaborations. Finally, I recognize the challenge of bringing this class into a virtual world. There are plenty of obstacles to ¿distance learning¿: You might struggle to understand an assignment. You might find it is easy to be distracted. You might have an unreliable internet. I¿m here to tell you: we¿re in this together. We¿re navigating uncharted territory here! That means we¿re going to think creatively, we¿re going to speak up when we have questions or ideas or complaints or objections. We¿re going to learn and problem-solve and create like we¿ve never learned or problem-solved or created before. And when we fail, we¿ll try again. Come join us!
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2
Instructors: Helms, J. (PI)

SURG 100C: Virtual and Real: Human Anatomy and Sports Injuries: Grand Rounds

This undergraduate course is designed to give students who have completed SURG 100a and /or SURG 1OOb, the opportunity to expand their knowledge of specific sports injuries through research and through the creation and deliverance of a grand rounds (45-60 minute) presentation. Students, with guidance by faculty, will work in groups and will each choose a specific sports injury to study. Students will be encouraged to use resources such as cadaver specimens, radiographs, CT scans, MRls, the 3D anatomy table and interactive digital applications, along with consulting experts in the field of sports medicine. Each grand round presentation will focus on a clinical case, and cover the patient's symptoms, medical history, clinical examination, lab tests, prescribed images, differential diagnosis, definitive diagnosis, treatment and treatment outcomes. The course will be given over an eight­week period. In the first week, students will be divided into groups, research potential sports injurie more »
This undergraduate course is designed to give students who have completed SURG 100a and /or SURG 1OOb, the opportunity to expand their knowledge of specific sports injuries through research and through the creation and deliverance of a grand rounds (45-60 minute) presentation. Students, with guidance by faculty, will work in groups and will each choose a specific sports injury to study. Students will be encouraged to use resources such as cadaver specimens, radiographs, CT scans, MRls, the 3D anatomy table and interactive digital applications, along with consulting experts in the field of sports medicine. Each grand round presentation will focus on a clinical case, and cover the patient's symptoms, medical history, clinical examination, lab tests, prescribed images, differential diagnosis, definitive diagnosis, treatment and treatment outcomes. The course will be given over an eight­week period. In the first week, students will be divided into groups, research potential sports injuries and decide on a specific sports injury to study. The second class will focus on each group developing a presentation outline and receive approval by faculty. In sessions three through six, students, under faculty supervision, will research and prepare their presentation, which will be presented to the entire class during weeks seven and eight. Sufficient time will be allotted for thorough discussion after each presentation. The class is limited to 16 students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

SURG 144: Athletes in Medicine at Stanford (AIMS)

AIMS has been created as a supplemental resource for student-athletes who have an interest in pursuing a career in medicine. The goal of the class is to foster an intimate community of current and former Stanford student-athletes in nmedicine providing resources and guidance to allow individuals a chance to thrive in this challenging and rewarding field. This will be a credit/no credit seminar with a focus on exploring topics such as medical school applications, nplacement tests, research, and careers in medicine.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: Sgroi, M. (PI)
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