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761 - 770 of 771 results for: Medicine

SURG 298: Procedure-Based Specialty Capstone Course

Designed for graduating medical students entering a procedure-based internship or residency (e.g. general surgery, surgical sub-specialties, obstetrics-gynecology, anesthesia, and emergency medicine). Prepares students with practical, high-yield clinical and procedural skills. Clinical skills include fielding common calls regarding surgical patients, obtaining informed consent, completing operative dictations, discharging patients, writing prescriptions, running trauma surveys, and interpreting surgically relevant radiology studies. The hands-on portion of the course covers basic open and laparoscopic surgical skills utilizing bench models, laparoscopic box trainers,and full cadaveric simulations. Prerequisite: graduating medical student. For those students who are not enrolled for the quarter in which this Capstone Course is offered, please contact Karen Cockerill at misskay@stanford.edu to register.
Last offered: Spring 2018

SURG 301A: Dental Medicine and Surgery Clerkship

Open to visitors. Stanford Plastic Surgery's Dental Section offers a 2-week clerkship for 3rd and 4th year medical and dental students interested in learning more about dental medicine and surgery. The rotation offers a broad exposure to the many different clinical facets of dental medicine and surgery from dentoalveolar trauma to clearance of oral infection prior to cancer treatment, transplants, or cardiac devices. Students will also have the opportunity to work in a variety of practice settings. The rotation consists of two one-week rotations that take place in Stanford Hospital and the Dental Medicine and Surgery/Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic. Students will meet and work with faculty from these sites. The students will work as members of the clinical teams and participate in the clinical care of dental surgery patients. Prereq: Dental or medical school student in 3rd or 4th year. Periods Avail: 7-12, full-time for two weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Wh more »
Open to visitors. Stanford Plastic Surgery's Dental Section offers a 2-week clerkship for 3rd and 4th year medical and dental students interested in learning more about dental medicine and surgery. The rotation offers a broad exposure to the many different clinical facets of dental medicine and surgery from dentoalveolar trauma to clearance of oral infection prior to cancer treatment, transplants, or cardiac devices. Students will also have the opportunity to work in a variety of practice settings. The rotation consists of two one-week rotations that take place in Stanford Hospital and the Dental Medicine and Surgery/Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic. Students will meet and work with faculty from these sites. The students will work as members of the clinical teams and participate in the clinical care of dental surgery patients. Prereq: Dental or medical school student in 3rd or 4th year. Periods Avail: 7-12, full-time for two weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Meet with Dr. Gaudilliere or designated dental faculty to touch base at 1st floor of Blake Wilbur at 7 am. Two week schedule will be distributed prior to first day of clerkship. Units: 3. Call Code: 3 - Call every third night Director: Dyani Gaudilliere, DMD, MPH, dyani.gaudilliere@stanford.edu, (650) 387-1431. Coord: Lillian C Lee (650-724-5985 or lilclee@stanford.edu. (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3

SURG 311C: Clerkship at the Burn Center

Selective 2. Open to visitors. Provides integrated patient care, from intensive care to outpatient care. Acute, rehabilitative, and reconstructive phases are seen and treated. Students work directly with a PGY-3 plastic surgery resident and the ICU nursing staff. This rotation is designed for the student with career goals in general or plastic surgery, emergency medicine, or intensive care work (e.g., anesthesiology). However, students interested in primary care or pediatrics will benefit greatly from this experience. Direct surgical experience in the operating room is guaranteed. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period (would consider 2). Reporting Instructions: Where: SCVMC, Plastic Surgery Office [Visitors must sign-in on the first day of rotation @ VSC Registration Desk 410]; Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 2, Taking call and weekend rounding will enhance the student's learning experience dramatically. It is left up to each student to decide if and how often they will take call. Director: Yvonne Karanas M.D. Other Faculty: Yvonne Karanas M.D. Coord: Desiree Fuentez (408-885-5315), SCVMC, 751 S. Bascom Avenue, Building Q, Suite 4Q265, San Jose, CA 95128. (SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

SURG 340B: Critical Care Clerkship

Open to visitors. This clerkship provides experience managing adult patients in a critical care unit. Students learn how to optimize care for the acutely ill patient and the multidisciplinary approach to complex patients. Teaching emphasizes the review of basic organ physiology, the ability to determine the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in critical illness, and the formulation of a physiologic based treatment plan. Students gain experience with the implementation of monitoring and therapeutic devices used in the intensive care units and begin to become adept at the evaluation, stabilization and management of the most critically ill patients expected to be encountered in today's acute care hospitals. Ward rounds, bedside evaluation and treatment, and individual interactions with attending, fellows and residents are part of the educational process. Students must attend mandatory simulator courses in order to receive passing grade for this clerkship. Students wishing to do this cle more »
Open to visitors. This clerkship provides experience managing adult patients in a critical care unit. Students learn how to optimize care for the acutely ill patient and the multidisciplinary approach to complex patients. Teaching emphasizes the review of basic organ physiology, the ability to determine the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in critical illness, and the formulation of a physiologic based treatment plan. Students gain experience with the implementation of monitoring and therapeutic devices used in the intensive care units and begin to become adept at the evaluation, stabilization and management of the most critically ill patients expected to be encountered in today's acute care hospitals. Ward rounds, bedside evaluation and treatment, and individual interactions with attending, fellows and residents are part of the educational process. Students must attend mandatory simulator courses in order to receive passing grade for this clerkship. Students wishing to do this clerkship must get approval from Bernadette Carvalho first before registering. Students must register for Anes 340B for this clerkship. Prereq: Anesthesia 306A or Medicine and Surgery core clerkships. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: PAVAMC, MSICU, 3rd Floor; Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 4. Director: Juliana Barr, M.D. (650-493-5000 x64452), Building 1, Room F315, PAVAMC (112A). Other Faculty: E. Bertaccini, R. Chitkara, G. Lighthall, W. Kuschner, G. Krishna, J. Olsson. Coord: Bernadette F. Carvalho (berniec@stanford.edu). (PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

THINK 48: Reading the Body: How Medicine and Culture Define the Self

How have our perceptions of what is considered normal/abnormal; beautiful/ugly; infected/uninfected changed over time? How do these changing medical and cultural representations of the body reflect larger societal shifts? How does illness change our perceptions of our bodies and our identities? Viewed through the lens of medicine, the body is a text that offers clues to health and illness, yet clinical readings are never entirely objective. Culture informs and distorts how we discern, accept, reject, and analyze our bodies. Looking at literary, medical, ethical, and anthropological texts, we ask how representations of the body affects the way we experience illness, embody gender and racial identities, and understand our rights (or lack of rights) to control our own bodies. We will critically examine our perceptions about the body and debate some of the most complex and sensitive issues surrounding the body, from the ethics of medical research trials to end of life decisions.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-ED

THINK 64: Healing, Illness, Stories

This course focuses on multiple genres of narratives about illness and recovery: memoirs, graphic novels, poetry, fiction, essay, and documentary film. It asks what the power, if any, of narrative is in healing. Drawing upon the fields of literature and the practice of medicine, students will begin to grapple with the power of stories in illuminating the experience of illness and disability and in offering the possibilities for (self) transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II

THINK 68: Our Genome

Genomes reveal a wealth of information with implications far beyond the linear sequence of the DNA. We will consider two questions related to the genome, coupled with examples from real-life consequences. Firstly, what does the genome say about our past: where we came from and how we might fit into the tapestry of the human race? We will look at examples from history and anonymized patients to highlight the consequences of these question for people. Next we will consider what the genome tells us about the future: how might it foretell our individual future and how might this be translated into patient treatment? We will examine the promises, pitfalls, and implications for the advances in medicine and healthcare promised by genomic research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

URBANST 122: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER

URBANST 122Z: Ethics and Politics in Public Service (CSRE 133P, POLISCI 133Z, PUBLPOL 103Z)

This course examines ethical and political questions that arise in doing public service work, whether volunteering, service learning, humanitarian endeavors overseas, or public service professions such as medicine and teaching. What motives do people have to engage in public service work? Are self-interested motives troublesome? What is the connection between service work and justice? Should the government or schools require citizens or students to perform service work? Is mandatory service an oxymoron?
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Coyne, B. (PI)

UROL 200SI: Introduction to Urology

Lunch seminars series designated to give preclinical students exposure to the field of Urology. This course will build on medical student's foundation knowledge. Clinical vignettes will be presented with an emphasis on disease presentations pathophysiology, work up, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatment. Seminars are taught by faculty experts in the Department of Urology. Topics include: general urology, uro-oncology, pediatric urology, endourology, female urology, neurourology, trauma and reconstruction, and male reproductive medicine and surgery. Lunch will be provided.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
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