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701 - 710 of 772 results for: Medicine

SOC 105D: Sociology of Health and Illness

This course examines the social causes and context of health, illness, and health care in the United States. Who stays healthy and who gets sick? How do individuals experience and make sense of illness? How docontextual factors (including socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, culture, social networks, and hospital quality) shape health and health care? What constitutes quality medical care and who gets it? To what degree do the spaces we inhabit and the relationships we form shape our health? What avenues exist for improving health care and reducing health disparities?In examining these questions, we will consider how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians address them in research and in the field. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine. nnBy the end of the course, students will: 1) have insight into the various ways of defining and measuring health, including more »
This course examines the social causes and context of health, illness, and health care in the United States. Who stays healthy and who gets sick? How do individuals experience and make sense of illness? How docontextual factors (including socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, culture, social networks, and hospital quality) shape health and health care? What constitutes quality medical care and who gets it? To what degree do the spaces we inhabit and the relationships we form shape our health? What avenues exist for improving health care and reducing health disparities?In examining these questions, we will consider how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians address them in research and in the field. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine. nnBy the end of the course, students will: 1) have insight into the various ways of defining and measuring health, including mortality, morbidity, physical functioning, and quality of life; 2) understand how a person¿s socio-demographic characteristics influence his or her health, including his or her ability to access resources vital to maintaining health and receiving treatment; 3) understand how researchersemploy theory and make causal inferences based on observational and experimental data; 4) comprehendhow patients and practitioners understand health and illness and their roles in the health care process; and 5) understand the role of medical care in the distribution of health outcomes across the population.
Last offered: Summer 2016

SOC 114: Economic Sociology (SOC 214)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 152: The Social Determinants of Health (SOC 252)

Our social and physical environments are widely recognized as playing a central role in shaping patterns of health and disease within and across populations. Across disciplines, a key question has been: How does the social environment ¿gets under the skin to influence health? In this course, we will explore how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians tackle this question. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine to understand the processes through which our environments shape health outcomes. We will examine a number of key social determinants of health, wellness and illness. These determinants include socioeconomic status, gender. race/ethnicity, religious affiliation, neighborhoods, environments, social relationships, and health care. We will also discuss a host of mechanisms through which these factors are hypothesized to influence health, such as stress, life more »
Our social and physical environments are widely recognized as playing a central role in shaping patterns of health and disease within and across populations. Across disciplines, a key question has been: How does the social environment ¿gets under the skin to influence health? In this course, we will explore how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians tackle this question. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine to understand the processes through which our environments shape health outcomes. We will examine a number of key social determinants of health, wellness and illness. These determinants include socioeconomic status, gender. race/ethnicity, religious affiliation, neighborhoods, environments, social relationships, and health care. We will also discuss a host of mechanisms through which these factors are hypothesized to influence health, such as stress, lifestyle, and access to health resources. An overall theme will be how contextual factors that adversely affect health are inequitably distributed and thereby fuel health disparities. Through all of this, we will assess the promise of public policy, planning and research for generating more equitable health outcomes across society.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI

SOC 167VP: Justice + Poverty Innovation:Create new solutions for people to navigate housing, medical, & debt

How can emerging technologies and human-centered design be used to help people going through problems with housing, medical care, and debt? In this class, we will work with local partners to develop new tech and design prototypes to address poverty-related problems. We will explore new digital solutions, as well as how to use emerging technologies like AI and blockchain. At the same time, we will explore policy and legal reforms that could address root causes of the problems.nStudents will work in small, interdisciplinary teams with partners organizations in law, medicine, and policy. They will do design research in the field, propose new solutions and test them, and develop new initiatives that will be piloted. The goal is to incubate promising, feasible public interest technology and design projects.nThe class will be run in parallel to similar classes in Mexico, Guatemala, and Colombia. Students will have the chance to learn about similar innovation efforts in other countries, and will be challenged to think about how their own projects could be replicated and scaled
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit

SOC 214: Economic Sociology (SOC 114)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

SOC 252: The Social Determinants of Health (SOC 152)

Our social and physical environments are widely recognized as playing a central role in shaping patterns of health and disease within and across populations. Across disciplines, a key question has been: How does the social environment ¿gets under the skin to influence health? In this course, we will explore how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians tackle this question. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine to understand the processes through which our environments shape health outcomes. We will examine a number of key social determinants of health, wellness and illness. These determinants include socioeconomic status, gender. race/ethnicity, religious affiliation, neighborhoods, environments, social relationships, and health care. We will also discuss a host of mechanisms through which these factors are hypothesized to influence health, such as stress, life more »
Our social and physical environments are widely recognized as playing a central role in shaping patterns of health and disease within and across populations. Across disciplines, a key question has been: How does the social environment ¿gets under the skin to influence health? In this course, we will explore how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians tackle this question. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine to understand the processes through which our environments shape health outcomes. We will examine a number of key social determinants of health, wellness and illness. These determinants include socioeconomic status, gender. race/ethnicity, religious affiliation, neighborhoods, environments, social relationships, and health care. We will also discuss a host of mechanisms through which these factors are hypothesized to influence health, such as stress, lifestyle, and access to health resources. An overall theme will be how contextual factors that adversely affect health are inequitably distributed and thereby fuel health disparities. Through all of this, we will assess the promise of public policy, planning and research for generating more equitable health outcomes across society.
Last offered: Spring 2018

SOMGEN 120: Compassion, Dignity and Empathy-Physician Communication Skills (SOMGEN 220)

As medical technology advances, research shows the human touch and the provider-patient interaction retains a critical role in the practice of medicine. This class uses fun and novel techniques to enhance communication skills and build empathy with others. Beyond clinical communication skills, we will learn how to be better communicators of complex medical and scientific skills with broader audiences, including the media. The class will meet with physicians who use social media to improve health literacy and with journalists who transform data into compelling stories about health and medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

SOMGEN 121: Media, Medicine & (Mis)information (SOMGEN 221)

The media ecosystem informs patient's perceptions of medicine and willingness to engage with healthcare workers. It shapes the practice of medicine and has the potential to fuel epidemics of vaccine-preventable diseases and to spread misinformation and disinformation. This class takes on Twitter and other platforms to examine the use of social media by healthcare workers, health activists and anti-science movements, each leveraging platforms to push forward their own agenda. We'll talk to health journalists to understand the challenges of a 24 hour news cycle in covering complex scientific and medical issues and learn how to better share our stories and messages with the media.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

SOMGEN 130: Sexual Diversity and Function Across Medical Disciplines

Focus is on the development of personal and professional skills to address medical and health issues related to human sexuality across a broad and diverse range of ages, gender, sexual orientation, sexual practices, and sexual function. Guest lectures will cover sexual issues from multiple medical disciplines and health perspectives of children (pediatric), adolescents, and young, middle-aged and older (geriatric) adults (geriatric). Consideration of sociocultural (predominantly U.S) norms is explored, including religious values and taboos, and sexual practices ranging from ¿stereotypically normal¿ to asexuality, celibacy, polyamory, and kink, etc. Emphasis is given to medical issues, e.g. the impact of specific medications, hormonal therapies, medical procedures, disabilities such as spinal cord injury, and treatments on sexual function and other issues that one might encounter in a general or specialty medical setting. Each week will include an 80-minute (Tuesday) class with a pair o more »
Focus is on the development of personal and professional skills to address medical and health issues related to human sexuality across a broad and diverse range of ages, gender, sexual orientation, sexual practices, and sexual function. Guest lectures will cover sexual issues from multiple medical disciplines and health perspectives of children (pediatric), adolescents, and young, middle-aged and older (geriatric) adults (geriatric). Consideration of sociocultural (predominantly U.S) norms is explored, including religious values and taboos, and sexual practices ranging from ¿stereotypically normal¿ to asexuality, celibacy, polyamory, and kink, etc. Emphasis is given to medical issues, e.g. the impact of specific medications, hormonal therapies, medical procedures, disabilities such as spinal cord injury, and treatments on sexual function and other issues that one might encounter in a general or specialty medical setting. Each week will include an 80-minute (Tuesday) class with a pair of related lectures, lecture, or video followed by class discussion, or student presentations, and a 50-minute ¿Queer Medicine¿ (Thursday) class organized by a Stanford Medical student, with overall direction by Marcia Stefanick, Professor of Medicine (SCRP, Ob/Gyn) Director of the Stanford Women¿s Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WSDM, ¿wisdom¿) Center.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOMGEN 150Q: Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Biology and Medicine

This course explores and challenges the physiological basis for distinguishing human "males" and "females", expands the concepts of "intersex" beyond reproductive anatomy/physiology (i.e. beyond the genitalia), and discusses some known consequences of "gender biases" in medical diagnoses and treatments. The influence of gender (sociocultural) "norms", i.e. gendered behaviors and relations, on human biology is juxtaposed with the role of biological traits on the construction of gender identity, roles and relationships, thereby focusing on the interactions of sex and gender on health and medical outcomes. Problems that may arise by labeling conditions that vary in incidence, prevalence and/or severity across the "male-female" spectrum as "men's" or "women's" health issues will be discussed. In addition, the importance of recognizing the spectrum of sex and gender, as well as sexual orientation, in clinical practice from pediatric to geriatric populations, will be highlighted, with consideration of varying perspectives within different race/ethnic, religious, political, and other groups.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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