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71 - 80 of 771 results for: Medicine

BIOC 200: Applied Biochemistry

Enrollment limited to MD candidates. Fundamental concepts of biochemistry as applied to clinical medicine. Topics include vitamins and cofactors, metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides, and the integration of metabolic pathways. Clinical case studies discussed in small-group, problem-based learning sessions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

BIOC 205: Molecular Foundations of Medicine

For medical students. The course examines the impact of molecular biology on medicine. Topics include DNA replication, recombination, and repair; genomics; gene transcription; protein translation; and proteins in cell decision-making. Medical impact is examined in patient presentations and small group discussions of papers from the medical literature.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

BIOC 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

BIODS 215: Topics in Biomedical Data Science: Large-scale inference

The recent explosion of data generated in the fields of biology and medicine has led to many analytical challenges and opportunities for understanding human health. This graduate-level course focuses on methodology for large-scale inference from biomedical data. Topics include one-dimensional and multidimensional probability distributions; hypothesis testing and model comparison; statistical modeling; and prediction. This course will place a special emphasis on applications of these approaches to i) human genetic data; ii) hospital in-patient and health questionnaire data, which is increasingly available with the emergence of large precision initiatives like the UK Biobank and Precision Medicine Initiative; and iii) wearable and social network data.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

BIODS 220: Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare (BIOMEDIN 220, CS 271)

Healthcare is one of the most exciting application domains of artificial intelligence, with transformative potential in areas ranging from medical image analysis to electronic health records-based prediction and precision medicine. This course will involve a deep dive into recent advances in AI in healthcare, focusing in particular on deep learning approaches for healthcare problems. We will start from foundations of neural networks, and then study cutting-edge deep learning models in the context of a variety of healthcare data including image, text, multimodal and time-series data. In the latter part of the course, we will cover advanced topics on open challenges of integrating AI in a societal application such as healthcare, including interpretability, robustness, privacy and fairness. The course aims to provide students from diverse backgrounds with both conceptual understanding and practical grounding of cutting-edge research on AI in healthcare.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Yeung, S. (PI)

BIOE 131: Ethics in Bioengineering (ETHICSOC 131X)

Bioengineering focuses on the development and application of new technologies in the biology and medicine. These technologies often have powerful effects on living systems at the microscopic and macroscopic level. They can provide great benefit to society, but they also can be used in dangerous or damaging ways. These effects may be positive or negative, and so it is critical that bioengineers understand the basic principles of ethics when thinking about how the technologies they develop can and should be applied. On a personal level, every bioengineer should understand the basic principles of ethical behavior in the professional setting. This course will involve substantial writing, and will use case-study methodology to introduce both societal and personal ethical principles, with a focus on practical applications.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

BIOE 193: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Human Health Research (BIO 193, CHEM 193, CHEMENG 193)

For undergraduate students participating in the Stanford ChEM-H Undergraduate Scholars Program. This course will expose students to interdisciplinary research questions and approaches that span chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Focus is on the development and practice of scientific reading, writing, and presentation skills intended to complement hands-on laboratory research. Students will read scientific articles, write research proposals, make posters, and give presentations.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

BIOE 217: Translational Bioinformatics (BIOMEDIN 217, CS 275, GENE 217)

Computational methods for the translation of biomedical data into diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications in medicine. Topics: multi-scale omics data generation and analysis, utility and limitations of public biomedical resources, machine learning and data mining, issues and opportunities in drug discovery, and mobile/digital health solutions. Case studies and course project. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with biology and statistics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

BIOE 222: Physics and Engineering Principles of Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects (RAD 222)

Physics and Engineering Principles of Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects ( RAD 222A)nFocuses on instruments, algorithms and other technologies for non-invasive imaging of molecular processes in living subjects. Introduces research and clinical molecular imaging modalities, including PET, SPECT, MRI, Ultrasound, Optics, and Photoacoustics. For each modality, lectures cover the basics of the origin and properties of imaging signal generation, instrumentation physics and engineering of signal detection, signal processing, image reconstruction, image data quantification, applications of machine learning, and applications of molecular imaging in medicine and biology research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

BIOE 229: Advanced Research Topics in Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects

Covers advanced topics and controversies in molecular imaging in the understanding of biology and disease. Lectures will include discussion on instrumentation, probes and bioassays. Topics will address unmet needs for visualization and quantification of molecular pathways in biology as well as for diagnosis and disease management. Areas of unmet clinical needs include those in oncology, neurology, cardiovascular medicine and musculoskeletal diseases. The aim is to identify important problems and controversies in a field and address them by providing background and relevance through review of the relevant primary literature, and then proposing and evaluating innovative imaging strategies that are designed to address the problem. The organization of lectures is similar to the thought process that is necessary for writing an NIH grant proposal in which aims are proposed and supported by background and relevance. The innovation of proposed approaches will be highlighted. An aim of the course is to inform students on how to creatively think about a problem and propose a solution focusing on the key elements of writing a successful grant proposal. Prerequisites: none.
Last offered: Spring 2017
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