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691 - 700 of 793 results for: Medicine

PWR 194BR: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: The Rhetoric of Health and Medicine

This course will aim to give students a foundation in the rhetoric of health and medicine across major stakeholders researchers, government, institutions, doctors, patients, journalists, and a general public obsessed with health and wellness. For example, we will analyze key theories about the relation of institutions, doctors, and patients, from Foucault's Birth of the Clinic to Rita Charon's Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness. We will also investigate how patients make sense of their illnesses through art and memoirs, how doctors are trained in an empathetic bedside manner, and the rhetoric of medical breakthroughs. From this foundation, students will choose an issue to tackle in their own research projects, from the politicization of Planned Parenthood and women's healthcare, to the experience of trans patients seeking care, to the rhetoric of access vs. coverage in current debates about health insurance. Prerequisite: completion of WR-1 & WR-2 req or permission of instructor. For full description, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/additional-elective-courses/rhetoric-health-and-medicine
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

PWR 194KD: Topics in Writing and Rhetoric: Technology and Human Values

Pining for a job in Google X but a little afraid of what disrupting the next social system will do to humans when all is said and done? Unsure where the real conversation is happening at Stanford about how to think more carefully and thoughtfully about the tech we are being trained to make? Curious to know what underlying common ground might link fuzzies with techies, humanists with engineers, scientists with philosophers? These are some of the issues we¿ll address in this seminar. You will be able to choose your own current topic¿drones, tech and medicine, Big Data, Cloud applications, AI and consciousness, cybersecurity, tech and the law¿for which you will choose readings and write a seminar paper and then co-lead discussion. The class goals are to know better the ethical value of one¿s tech work and research and to be able to express to scientists and non-scientists alike the ways in which this work contributes to the greater human good (beyond strict convenience or short-term profit). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

RAD 201: Introduction to Radiology

This seminar is offered to pre-clinical medical students interested in learning about how image-based anatomy can reinforce their knowledge of gross anatomy as they progress through the term. This also serves as a refresher for MSII students. Within this seminar, students will explore image findings in human anatomy in the normal and diseased state. The course will also cover when to request X-Ray, Flouroscopy, Ultrasound, CT, MRI, and Nuclear Medicine. There will be time to explore Radiology as a career choice as well as research opportunities in Radiology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

RAD 206: Mixed-Reality in Medicine

Mixed reality uses transparent displays to place virtual objects in the user's field of vision such that they can be aligned to and interact with actual objects. This has tremendous potential for medical applications. The course aims to teach the basics of mixed-reality device technology, and to directly connect engineering students to physicians for real-world applications. Student teams would compete guided assignments on developing new mixed-reality technology and a final project applying mixed-reality to solve real medical challenges. Prerequisites: (1) Programming competency in a language such as C, C++. or Python. (2) A basic signal processing course such as EE102B (Digital Signal Processing). A medical imaging course, while not required, will be helpful. Please contact the instructors with any questions about prerequisites.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

RAD 222: Physics and Engineering Principles of Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects (BIOE 222)

Physics and Engineering Principles of Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects ( RAD 222A). Focuses on instruments, algorithms and other technologies for non-invasive imaging of molecular processes in living subjects. Introduces research and clinical molecular imaging modalities, including PET, SPECT, MRI, Ultrasound, Optics, and Photoacoustics. For each modality, lectures cover the basics of the origin and properties of imaging signal generation, instrumentation physics and engineering of signal detection, signal processing, image reconstruction, image data quantification, applications of machine learning, and applications of molecular imaging in medicine and biology research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Levin, C. (PI)

RAD 260: Computational Methods for Biomedical Image Analysis and Interpretation (BIOMEDIN 260, CS 235)

The latest biological and medical imaging modalities and their applications in research and medicine. Focus is on computational analytic and interpretive approaches to optimize extraction and use of biological and clinical imaging data for diagnostic and therapeutic translational medical applications. Topics include major image databases, fundamental methods in image processing and quantitative extraction of image features, structured recording of image information including semantic features and ontologies, indexing, search and content-based image retrieval. Case studies include linking image data to genomic, phenotypic and clinical data, developing representations of image phenotypes for use in medical decision support and research applications and the role that biomedical imaging informatics plays in new questions in biomedical science. Includes a project. Enrollment for 3 units requires instructor consent. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A, familiarity with statistics, basic biology. Knowledge of Matlab or Python highly recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

RAD 301A: Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: This is the core radiology clerkship designed for students going into any medical subspecialty, including radiology. The four-week course has traditionally been lecture-based and provides a framework for understanding the role of various medical imaging modalities in diagnosis and management of a broad range of medical disorders. Emphasis is placed on learning the benefits and drawbacks of radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine studies, and basic interventional techniques for application to clinical practice. Core concepts that apply across medical subspecialties, including radiation exposure, the utilization (and risks) of radiographic contrast agents, and effective ordering of imaging studies are covered. Students are taught by radiology faculty, fellows, and residents including sessions focused on essential topics in chest, abdominal, neurological, and musculo more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: This is the core radiology clerkship designed for students going into any medical subspecialty, including radiology. The four-week course has traditionally been lecture-based and provides a framework for understanding the role of various medical imaging modalities in diagnosis and management of a broad range of medical disorders. Emphasis is placed on learning the benefits and drawbacks of radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine studies, and basic interventional techniques for application to clinical practice. Core concepts that apply across medical subspecialties, including radiation exposure, the utilization (and risks) of radiographic contrast agents, and effective ordering of imaging studies are covered. Students are taught by radiology faculty, fellows, and residents including sessions focused on essential topics in chest, abdominal, neurological, and musculoskeletal imaging. Sessions on pediatric imaging, breast imaging and obstetric ultrasound are also included. Students will be increasingly involved in patient management by becoming actively engaged in radiology reading rooms. Students will have the opportunity to take on the role of a junior resident by preliminarily interpreting and dictating basic radiology studies in selected radiology sections (e.g. chest, abdominal, musculoskeletal, etc.). Two quizzes are administered during the course and must be passed for credit. No credit will be given if student has more than 2 unapproved absences from scheduled sessions. This clerkship is limited to Stanford students only. A basic radiology textbook, online radiology texts and other web based materials will be made available to all participants. PREREQUISITES: Medicine 300A, Pediatrics 300A, or Surgery 300A strongly advised. Visiting students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from the Clerkship Coordinator before applying. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 5, 6, 11, and 12, full-time for three weeks, 22 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Christopher Beaulieu, M.D., Ph.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Ann Vo, 650-497-5407, annvo@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Varies - P080, P083, P265, H2211 (instructions on Radiology 301A website, Canvas); Time: Check schedule. CALL CODE: 2 - Optional Shadow Call with Radiology Resident Director. OTHER FACULTY: Radiology faculty, fellows, and residents. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 6

RAD 302A: Nuclear Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Acquaints students with the basic principles of nuclear medicine, the instrumentation used, the gamut of procedures available, and the judgments used to select specific diagnostic or therapeutic procedures and interpret results. The experience should be especially helpful for students planning a career in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiology, or oncology. The student experience includes instruction in radiologic physics, instrumentation, responsibility for selected isotopic procedures, daily teaching rounds for review of all cases studies, and special conferences. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from the Department prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to Sofia Gonzales (sofias@stanford.edu). PREREQUISITES: Medicine 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Andrei Iagaru, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Sofia Gonzales (650-724-9139), Room H2200. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Nuclear Medicine Clinic, Second Floor, C21; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: C. Aparici, G. Davidzon, B. Franc, F. Moradi. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

RAD 303A: Specialty Clerkship in Diagnostic Radiology

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Provides subspecialty radiology reading room experience for students considering a career in radiology or other specialties. Students work alongside residents, fellows, and faculty to actively interpret and communicate diagnostic radiology studies. Up to 12 students can be accommodated per session, with a maximum of two students on each subspecialty service at a time. Typically, students spend three weeks in each of two subspecialties. (Subspecialty rotations and interventional radiology are listed elsewhere in the course catalog.) For Rad 303A, subspecialty rotations include: Chest (primarily ICU radiographs and CT), Cardiovascular (inpatient and outpatient CT and MRI), Abdominal CT (primarily inpatient and emergency), Abdominal US (primarily inpatient and emergency), GI Fluoroscopy, Musculoskeletal (primarily radiography), Neuroradiology (inpatient and emergency), Body MRI, Pediatric Imaging, Breast Imaging, and N more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Provides subspecialty radiology reading room experience for students considering a career in radiology or other specialties. Students work alongside residents, fellows, and faculty to actively interpret and communicate diagnostic radiology studies. Up to 12 students can be accommodated per session, with a maximum of two students on each subspecialty service at a time. Typically, students spend three weeks in each of two subspecialties. (Subspecialty rotations and interventional radiology are listed elsewhere in the course catalog.) For Rad 303A, subspecialty rotations include: Chest (primarily ICU radiographs and CT), Cardiovascular (inpatient and outpatient CT and MRI), Abdominal CT (primarily inpatient and emergency), Abdominal US (primarily inpatient and emergency), GI Fluoroscopy, Musculoskeletal (primarily radiography), Neuroradiology (inpatient and emergency), Body MRI, Pediatric Imaging, Breast Imaging, and Nuclear Medicine. Similar rotations are also possible at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center. PREREQUISITES: Visiting students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from the Clerkship Coordinator before applying. Stanford students are asked to inform the clerkship coordinator of enrollment for coordination with subspecialty services. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 12 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Christopher Beaulieu, M.D., Ph.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Ann Vo, 650-497-5407, annvo@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: TBA (call 4-8 weeks prior); Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 2 - Shadow Call with Radiology Resident. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

RAD 304A: Pediatric Radiology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Our clerkship is designed to give you an overview of the exciting field of pediatric radiology. The rotation includes a comprehensive curriculum including a wealth of didactic and clinical conferences, directed reading assignments, interactive online teaching modules, and image interpretation with our outstanding pediatric radiology faculty. You will be exposed to all radiologic imaging modalities including MRI, CT, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and plain radiography and will have the unique opportunity to participate in perinatal imaging including prenatal ultrasound and fetal MRI. If time allows, additional exposure to Nuclear Medicine, Interventional Radiology, and Neuroradiology is available. Students will be expected to give a short presentation of an interesting imaging case to faculty and fellows at the end of their rotation. Visiting students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from Clerkship more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Our clerkship is designed to give you an overview of the exciting field of pediatric radiology. The rotation includes a comprehensive curriculum including a wealth of didactic and clinical conferences, directed reading assignments, interactive online teaching modules, and image interpretation with our outstanding pediatric radiology faculty. You will be exposed to all radiologic imaging modalities including MRI, CT, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and plain radiography and will have the unique opportunity to participate in perinatal imaging including prenatal ultrasound and fetal MRI. If time allows, additional exposure to Nuclear Medicine, Interventional Radiology, and Neuroradiology is available. Students will be expected to give a short presentation of an interesting imaging case to faculty and fellows at the end of their rotation. Visiting students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from Clerkship Coordinator before applying. PREREQUISITES: Radiology 301A or a similar general radiology clerkship or consent of instructor. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Jayne Seekins, D.O. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Ann Vo (650-497-5407, annvo@stanford.edu). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: LPCH (Radiology Dept. Secretary); Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: R. Barth, F. Blankenberg, F. Chan, H. Dahmoush, H. Daldrup-Link, L. Donnelly, D. Frush, C. Guimaraes, S. Halabi, S. Josephs, D. Larson, M. Lungren, H. Nadel, B. Newman, E. Rubesova, J. Seekins, A. Thakor, S. Vasanawala, K. Yeom, E. Zucker. LOCATION: LPCH.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5
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