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681 - 690 of 792 results for: Medicine

PSYCH 298: Advanced Studies in Health Psychology

This course provides an overview of the major concepts and questions in the field of health psychology. Through reading, lecture and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a number of psychological and social influences in determining health including: emotions, beliefs, relationships, stress, motivation, behavior change, spirituality, culture, and social influence. Students will also discuss the role of important and current topics in the field of health psychology and medicine such as the changing role of the patient and provider relationship, health-care policy and the environment, placebo effects, wearable health devices, and the use of technology in medicine. Course is offered to graduate students and advanced undergraduates with permission from the instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2018

PSYCH 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Repeatable for credit

PUBLPOL 4: Democracy Matters (ECON 4, PHIL 30, POLISCI 42)

Should the U.S. close its border to immigrants? What are the ramifications of income inequality? How has COVID-19 changed life as we know it? Why are Americans so politically polarized? How can we address racial injustice? As the 2020 election approaches, faculty members from across Stanford will explore and examine some of the biggest challenges facing society today. Each week will be dedicated to a different topic, ranging from health care and the economy to racial injustice and challenges to democracy. Faculty with expertise in philosophy, economics, law, political science, psychology, medicine, history, and more will come together for lively conversations about the issues not only shaping this election season but also the nation and world at large. There will also be a Q&A following the initial discussion. Attendance and supplemental course readings are the only requirements for the course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

PUBLPOL 103D: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER

PUBLPOL 103Z: Ethics and Politics in Public Service (CSRE 133P, POLISCI 133Z, URBANST 122Z)

This course examines ethical and political questions that arise in doing public service work, whether volunteering, service learning, humanitarian endeavors overseas, or public service professions such as medicine and teaching. What motives do people have to engage in public service work? Are self-interested motives troublesome? What is the connection between service work and justice? Should the government or schools require citizens or students to perform service work? Is mandatory service an oxymoron?
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

PUBLPOL 129: Conversations on the Indian Economy

This course is intended to give students the opportunity to engage with Stanford faculty, across the University's different schools, who undertake research related to the modern Indian economy, including professors from the Humanities and Sciences, Engineering, GSB and schools of medicine, as well as from different research centers across the University. In addition, the course will feature conversations with several members of the Silicon Valley Community, as well as from India. The format is intended to promote discussion and debate, and to provide students an opportunity to learn about new developments and initiatives regarding India. Class meetings will be in the form of round-table interactions and exchanges.
Last offered: Winter 2018

PUBLPOL 353A: Science and Technology Policy

U.S. policies for science, technology, and innovation; political institutions that create and carry out these policies; government programs that support scientific research and the development and use of new technologies; political controversies surrounding some science and technologies and the regulation of research and technology; international aspects of science and technology; the roles of scientists, engineers, and physicians in creating and implementing policy; and opportunities to do policy work in government and other organizations. Assignments: analyzing the politics of particular executive and legislative proposals, assessing options for trying to reach specific policy objectives, and preparing mock memos and testimony. This course is designed primarily for graduate students in science, engineering, and medicine who want to learn more about science and technology policy and how it is made. Public Policy 353A is a "gateway course" - an introduction - both for students pursuing a joint degree or co-terminal degree in Public Policy and for other graduate students interested in S&T policy or possible careers in the policy world. Junior and senior undergraduate students are also welcome to enroll.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Windham, P. (PI)

PWR 1LF: Writing & Rhetoric 1: #NoBodyIsDisposable: The Rhetoric of Disability

In this class we will move beyond definitions of disability as "abnormality" or "deviance" to explore how advances in science, technology, medicine, and culture have transformed our understanding of what constitutes a "normal' human body. We will ask how arguments about disability incorporate concepts such as neurodiversity, chronic illness, and other invisible conditions. At the same time, we will study how contemporary perspectives on disability interact with issues such as technology, metaphors of the prosthesis, cultural constructions of the body, and even what it means to be human. For course videos and full descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1
Instructors: Felt, L. (PI)

PWR 1PF: Writing & Rhetoric 1: Body Rhetoric East and West: Gender, Sport, Art, and Medicine

Rhetorical analysis of readings, research, and argument. Focus is on development of a substantive research-based argument using multiple sources. Individual conferences with instructor. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: Writing 1

PWR 1TD: Writing & Rhetoric 1: Anatomy of a Discipline: Rhetorics of Health, Illness, and Medicine

Rhetorical analysis of readings, research, and argument. Focus is on development of a substantive research-based argument using multiple sources. Individual conferences with instructor. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1
Instructors: Diener, T. (PI)
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