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681 - 690 of 772 results for: Medicine

RAD 260: Computational Methods for Biomedical Image Analysis and Interpretation (BIOMEDIN 260, CS 235)

The latest biological and medical imaging modalities and their applications in research and medicine. Focus is on computational analytic and interpretive approaches to optimize extraction and use of biological and clinical imaging data for diagnostic and therapeutic translational medical applications. Topics include major image databases, fundamental methods in image processing and quantitative extraction of image features, structured recording of image information including semantic features and ontologies, indexing, search and content-based image retrieval. Case studies include linking image data to genomic, phenotypic and clinical data, developing representations of image phenotypes for use in medical decision support and research applications and the role that biomedical imaging informatics plays in new questions in biomedical science. Includes a project. Enrollment for 3 units requires instructor consent. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A, familiarity with statistics, basic biology. Knowledge of Matlab or Python highly recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

RAD 301A: Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. This is the core radiology clerkship designed for students going into any medical subspecialty, including radiology. The four-week course has traditionally been lecture-based and provides a framework for understanding the role of various medical imaging modalities in diagnosis and management of a broad range of medical disorders. Emphasis is placed on learning the benefits and drawbacks of radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine studies, and basic interventional techniques for application to clinical practice. Core concepts that apply across medical subspecialties, including radiation exposure, the utilization (and risks) of radiographic contrast agents, and effective ordering of imaging studies are covered. Students are taught by radiology faculty, fellows, and residents including sessions focused on essential topics in chest, abdominal, neurological, and musculoskeletal imaging. Sessions on pediatric im more »
Selective 1. Open to visitors. This is the core radiology clerkship designed for students going into any medical subspecialty, including radiology. The four-week course has traditionally been lecture-based and provides a framework for understanding the role of various medical imaging modalities in diagnosis and management of a broad range of medical disorders. Emphasis is placed on learning the benefits and drawbacks of radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine studies, and basic interventional techniques for application to clinical practice. Core concepts that apply across medical subspecialties, including radiation exposure, the utilization (and risks) of radiographic contrast agents, and effective ordering of imaging studies are covered. Students are taught by radiology faculty, fellows, and residents including sessions focused on essential topics in chest, abdominal, neurological, and musculoskeletal imaging. Sessions on pediatric imaging, breast imaging and obstetric ultrasound are also included. Students will be increasingly involved in patient management by becoming actively engaged in radiology reading rooms. Students will have the opportunity to take on the role of a junior resident by preliminarily interpreting and dictating basic radiology studies in selected radiology sections (e.g. chest, abdominal, musculoskeletal, etc.). Two quizzes are administered during the course and must be passed for credit. No credit will be given if student has more than 2 unapproved absences from scheduled sessions. This clerkship is limited to Stanford students only. A basic radiology textbook, online radiology texts and other web based materials will be made available to all participants. Prereq: Medicine 300A, Pediatrics 300A, or Surgery 300A strongly advised. Periods Avail: 4, 5, 8, and 9, full-time for four weeks. 22 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Varies ¿ P080, P083, P265, H2211 (instructions on Radiology 301A website, Canvas); Time: Check schedule. Units: 6. Call Code: 2 Optional Shadow Call with Radiology Resident Director: Christopher Beaulieu, M.D., Ph.D. Other Faculty: Radiology faculty, fellows, and residents Coord: Ann Vo (650-497-5407, annvo@stanford.edu). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 6

RAD 302A: Nuclear Medicine Clerkship

Open to visitors. Acquaints students with the basic principles of nuclear medicine, the instrumentation used, the gamut of procedures available, and the judgments used to select specific diagnostic or therapeutic procedures and interpret results. The experience should be especially helpful for students planning a career in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiology, or oncology. The student experience includes instruction in radiologic physics, instrumentation, responsibility for selected isotopic procedures, daily teaching rounds for review of all cases studies, and special conferences. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from the Department prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to Sofia Gonzales (sofias@stanford.edu). Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Nuclear Medicine Clinic, Second Floor, C21; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Andrei Iagaru, M.D. Other Faculty: C. Aparici, G. Davidzon, B. Franc, F. Moradi. Coord: Sofia Gonzales (650-724-9139), Room H2200. (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

RAD 303A: Specialty Clerkship in Diagnostic Radiology

Open to visitors. Provides subspecialty radiology reading room experience for students considering a career in radiology or other specialties. Students work alongside residents, fellows, and faculty to actively interpret and communicate diagnostic radiology studies. Up to 12 students can be accommodated per session, with a maximum of two students on each subspecialty service at a time. Typically, students spend two weeks in each of two subspecialties. (Full month subspecialty rotations and interventional radiology are listed elsewhere in the course catalog.) For Rad 303A, subspecialty rotations include: Chest (primarily ICU radiographs and CT), Cardiovascular (inpatient and outpatient CT and MRI), Abdominal CT (primarily inpatient and emergency), Abdominal US (primarily inpatient and emergency), GI Fluoroscopy, Musculoskeletal (primarily radiography), Neuroradiology (inpatient and emergency), Body MRI, Pediatric Imaging, Breast Imaging, and Nuclear Medicine. Similar rotations are also more »
Open to visitors. Provides subspecialty radiology reading room experience for students considering a career in radiology or other specialties. Students work alongside residents, fellows, and faculty to actively interpret and communicate diagnostic radiology studies. Up to 12 students can be accommodated per session, with a maximum of two students on each subspecialty service at a time. Typically, students spend two weeks in each of two subspecialties. (Full month subspecialty rotations and interventional radiology are listed elsewhere in the course catalog.) For Rad 303A, subspecialty rotations include: Chest (primarily ICU radiographs and CT), Cardiovascular (inpatient and outpatient CT and MRI), Abdominal CT (primarily inpatient and emergency), Abdominal US (primarily inpatient and emergency), GI Fluoroscopy, Musculoskeletal (primarily radiography), Neuroradiology (inpatient and emergency), Body MRI, Pediatric Imaging, Breast Imaging, and Nuclear Medicine. Similar rotations are also possible at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center. Visiting students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from the Clerkship Coordinator before applying. Stanford students are asked to inform the clerkship coordinator of enrollment for coordination with subspecialty services. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for 2 or 4 weeks. 12 students per period. nReporting Instructions: Where: TBA (call 4-8 weeks prior); Time: TBA. Units: 6 (72). Call Code: 2 Shadow Call with Radiology Resident. Director: Christopher Beaulieu, M.D., Ph.D. Coord: Ann Vo (650-497-5407, annvo@stanford.edu). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit

RAD 305A: Interventional Radiology Clerkship

Open to visitors. Interventional radiology (IR) has become integral to the practice of modern medicine. In 2013, the American Board of Medical Specialties recognized IR as a primary specialty distinct from diagnostic radiology. Subsequently, the ACGME approved the formation of a new IR residency training program ( http://www.sirweb.org/clinical/IR_DR_cert.shtml), which has begun at Stanford. This 2 or 4 week elective introduces medical students to image-guided, minimally invasive vascular and nonvascular interventions and is appropriate for students considering residency training in IR as well as those interested in learning more about the field in general. Students will be exposed to a broad range of IR procedures, including interventional oncology, peripheral vascular (venous and arterial), genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and pediatric interventions. This elective provides students experience in basic IR skills such as vascular access, placement of venous access catheters and ports, more »
Open to visitors. Interventional radiology (IR) has become integral to the practice of modern medicine. In 2013, the American Board of Medical Specialties recognized IR as a primary specialty distinct from diagnostic radiology. Subsequently, the ACGME approved the formation of a new IR residency training program ( http://www.sirweb.org/clinical/IR_DR_cert.shtml), which has begun at Stanford. This 2 or 4 week elective introduces medical students to image-guided, minimally invasive vascular and nonvascular interventions and is appropriate for students considering residency training in IR as well as those interested in learning more about the field in general. Students will be exposed to a broad range of IR procedures, including interventional oncology, peripheral vascular (venous and arterial), genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and pediatric interventions. This elective provides students experience in basic IR skills such as vascular access, placement of venous access catheters and ports, and image-guided biopsies and drain placement. Students are encouraged to take part in more advanced procedures such as chemoembolization, radioembolization, and TIPS. Our service operates like a surgical subspecialty and students are expected to be an integral part of the IR team and actively participate in the pre-procedure evaluation and post-procedure care of our patients. Students may attend various departmental and interdepartmental conferences. Interested students are encouraged to give a short presentation on an interesting case at the end of the rotation. Note: Visiting students interested in rotating through this clerkship must receive prior approval from the Clerkship Coordinator before applying. Prereq: Surgery 300A. Medicine 300A and Radiology 301A recommended but not required. Periods Avail: 2-12, full-time for 2 or 4 weeks. Maximum 3 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: H3652; Time: 7:30 am. Units: 3 or 6. Call Code: 0 Director: David S. Wang, M.D. Other Faculty: L. Hofmann, D. Hovsepian, G. Hwang, N. Kothary, W. Kuo, J. Louie, D. Sze. Coord: Ann Vo (650-497-5407, annvo@stanford.edu). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit

RAD 398A: Clinical Elective in Diagnostic Radiology & Nuclear Medicine

Closed to visitors. Provides an opportunity for a student in the clinical years to have a clinical experience in Diagnostic Radiology or Nuclear Medicine, of a quality and duration to be decided upon by the student and a faculty preceptor in the Department. The student must make individual arrangements with a faculty member in Diagnostic Radiology or Nuclear Medicine. Please note: Students cannot add 398A clerkships directly to their fishbowl schedules through the regular shuffles. Please contact Caroline Cheang in the Office of Medical Student Affairs at cheang@stanford.edu or 650-498-7619 with the faculty preceptor¿s name and email address to add this clerkship. Prereq: None for Diagnostic Radiology; Medicine 300A for Nuclear Medicine. Consent of the designated faculty preceptor and approval by Advisor. Periods Avail: 1-12. Reporting Instructions: Where: TBA (designated faculty preceptor); Time: TBA. Units: 1 to 12. Call Code: 2 (varies with preceptor). Director: Christopher Beaulieu, M.D., Ph.D. Coord: Ann Vo (650-497-5407, annvo@stanford.edu). (SUMC, LPCH)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit

RADO 300A: Radiation Oncology Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. The Stanford Department of Radiation Oncology welcomes 3rd and 4th year medical students interested in a 4-week rotation. Located in a NCI designated cancer center at the heart of Silicon Valley, our clerkship offers excellent clinical training for the development of future leaders of our field. Each rotation consists of a 4-week block that adheres to the Stanford University School of Medicine rotation schedule. During this rotation, the medical student will be assigned to one faculty member each day with whom he or she will see patients with in clinic. The first two weeks consist of multidisciplinary teams and tumor boards; exposing students to the entire spectrum of radiation oncology. The last two weeks of the rotation will consist of personalized, intensive work with faculty members in fields of interest to the student. Students will attend weekly lectures with the residents on different radiation oncology topics and in addition, will have student spe more »
Selective 1. Open to visitors. The Stanford Department of Radiation Oncology welcomes 3rd and 4th year medical students interested in a 4-week rotation. Located in a NCI designated cancer center at the heart of Silicon Valley, our clerkship offers excellent clinical training for the development of future leaders of our field. Each rotation consists of a 4-week block that adheres to the Stanford University School of Medicine rotation schedule. During this rotation, the medical student will be assigned to one faculty member each day with whom he or she will see patients with in clinic. The first two weeks consist of multidisciplinary teams and tumor boards; exposing students to the entire spectrum of radiation oncology. The last two weeks of the rotation will consist of personalized, intensive work with faculty members in fields of interest to the student. Students will attend weekly lectures with the residents on different radiation oncology topics and in addition, will have student specific lectures on general radiation oncology topics such as treatment planning. During the clerkship, students will be expected to work-up patients, perform physical exams, and present cases to faculty. Students will also be exposed to treatment planning, simulations, and treatment deliveries throughout the rotation. At the end of the clerkship, students will be expected to give a 10-minute presentation on a topic of their choosing. For students interested in pursuing additional experience within our department, an advanced elective ( RADO 398A) is available following the completion of the first rotation. Prereq: Med 300A and/or Surg 300A. Periods Avail: 1-5, 8-12, full-time for four weeks. 3 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Contact Jessica Frank at Jefrank@stanford.edu (650-724-7673) for time and location. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Erqi Pollom, M.D., MS. Coord: Jessica Frank (650-724-7673; jefrank@stanford.edu). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit

SBIO 251: Biotechnology in the Natural World (BIOS 251)

Life can be found in some of the strangest and most inhospitable places of Earth. Whether in hot springs, oceanic depths, or dense rainforests, living organisms must be natural specialists to survive. This course explores a selection of strange and ingenious biomolecules that natural organisms have evolved in order to survive. Lectures will cover historical background as well as detailed investigations of the structure and function of selected biomolecules of interest. The majority of each lecture and discussion will focus on the adaptation of those molecules for fundamental and innovative approaches in modern biotechnology, especially in medicine and biophotonics. Key biophysical and biochemical techniques will be discussed as they are encountered within primary literature.
Last offered: Winter 2017

SIMILE 91: Science In the Making an Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II

SIMILE 92: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II
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