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671 - 680 of 772 results for: Medicine

PUBLPOL 353A: Science and Technology Policy

U.S. policies for science, technology, and innovation; political institutions that create and carry out these policies; government programs that support scientific research and the development and use of new technologies; political controversies surrounding some science and technologies and the regulation of research and technology; international aspects of science and technology; the roles of scientists, engineers, and physicians in creating and implementing policy; and opportunities to do policy work in government and other organizations. Assignments: analyzing the politics of particular executive and legislative proposals, assessing options for trying to reach specific policy objectives, and preparing mock memos and testimony. This course is designed primarily for graduate students in science, engineering, and medicine who want to learn more about science and technology policy and how it is made. Public Policy 353A is a "gateway course" - an introduction - both for students pursuing a joint degree or co-terminal degree in Public Policy and for other graduate students interested in S&T policy or possible careers in the policy world. Junior and senior undergraduate students are also welcome to enroll.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Windham, P. (PI)

PWR 1LF: Writing & Rhetoric 1: The New Normal: The Rhetoric of Disability

In this class we will move beyond definitions of disability as "abnormality" or "deviance" to explore how advances in science, technology, medicine, and culture have transformed our understanding of what constitutes a "normal' human body. We will ask how arguments about disability incorporate concepts such as neurodiversity, chronic illness, and other invisible conditions. At the same time, we will study how contemporary perspectives on disability interact with issues such as technology, metaphors of the prosthesis, cultural constructions of the body, and even what it means to be human. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1

PWR 1PF: Writing & Rhetoric 1: Body Rhetoric East and West: Gender, Sport, Art, and Medicine

Rhetorical analysis of readings, research, and argument. Focus is on development of a substantive research-based argument using multiple sources. Individual conferences with instructor. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: Writing 1

PWR 1TD: Writing & Rhetoric 1: Anatomy of a Discipline: Rhetorics of Health, Illness, and Medicine

Rhetorical analysis of readings, research, and argument. Focus is on development of a substantive research-based argument using multiple sources. Individual conferences with instructor. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1
Instructors: Diener, T. (PI)

PWR 2SPB: Writing & Rhetoric 2: Hope, Health, and Healing: The Rhetoric of Medicine

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Further work in developing skills in argument and research-based writing, with emphasis on both written and oral/multimedia presentation of research. For more information about PWR 2, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-2. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2
Instructors: Pittock, S. (PI)

PWR 91SP: Intermediate Writing: Doctors' Stories: The Rhetoric of Illness and Healing

While medicine is a science that relies on meticulous research and professional protocols, it is also full of characters, conflicts, scenes, dialogues, and resolutions; in other words, stories. This course explores why we must value communication in medicine and how narratives mediate that communication. During the quarter, you will pursue independent research on a topic of your choice in the health sciences and practice interviewing experts as well as writing accurate and engaging science journalism in a number of genres: the story pitch, the news story, and the profile. Your final project will be a research-based digital magazine story coached by the Stanford Storytelling Project.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 194BR: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: The Rhetoric of Health and Medicine

This course will aim to give students a foundation in the rhetoric of health and medicine across major stakeholders researchers, government, institutions, doctors, patients, journalists, and a general public obsessed with health and wellness. For example, we will analyze key theories about the relation of institutions, doctors, and patients, from Foucault's Birth of the Clinic to Rita Charon's Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness. We will also investigate how patients make sense of their illnesses through art and memoirs, how doctors are trained in an empathetic bedside manner, and the rhetoric of medical breakthroughs. From this foundation, students will choose an issue to tackle in their own research projects, from the politicization of Planned Parenthood and women's healthcare, to the experience of trans patients seeking care, to the rhetoric of access vs. coverage in current debates about health insurance. Prerequisite: completion of WR-1 & WR-2 req or permission of instructor. For full description, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/additional-elective-courses/rhetoric-health-and-medicine
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

PWR 194KD: Topics in Writing and Rhetoric: Technology and Human Values

Pining for a job in Google X but a little afraid of what disrupting the next social system will do to humans when all is said and done? Unsure where the real conversation is happening at Stanford about how to think more carefully and thoughtfully about the tech we are being trained to make? Curious to know what underlying common ground might link fuzzies with techies, humanists with engineers, scientists with philosophers? These are some of the issues we¿ll address in this seminar. You will be able to choose your own current topic¿drones, tech and medicine, Big Data, Cloud applications, AI and consciousness, cybersecurity, tech and the law¿for which you will choose readings and write a seminar paper and then co-lead discussion. The class goals are to know better the ethical value of one¿s tech work and research and to be able to express to scientists and non-scientists alike the ways in which this work contributes to the greater human good (beyond strict convenience or short-term profit). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

RAD 206: Mixed-Reality in Medicine

Mixed reality uses transparent displays to place virtual objects in the user's field of vision such that they can be aligned to and interact with actual objects. This has tremendous potential for medical applications. The course aims to teach the basics of mixed-reality device technology, and to directly connect engineering students to physicians for real-world applications. Student teams would compete guided assignments on developing new mixed-reality technology and a final project applying mixed-reality to solve real medical challenges. Prerequisites: (1) Programming competency in a language such as C, C++. or Python. (2) A basic signal processing course such as EE102B (Digital Signal Processing). A medical imaging course, while not required, will be helpful. Please contact the instructors with any questions about prerequisites.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

RAD 222: Physics and Engineering Principles of Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects (BIOE 222)

Physics and Engineering Principles of Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects ( RAD 222A)nFocuses on instruments, algorithms and other technologies for non-invasive imaging of molecular processes in living subjects. Introduces research and clinical molecular imaging modalities, including PET, SPECT, MRI, Ultrasound, Optics, and Photoacoustics. For each modality, lectures cover the basics of the origin and properties of imaging signal generation, instrumentation physics and engineering of signal detection, signal processing, image reconstruction, image data quantification, applications of machine learning, and applications of molecular imaging in medicine and biology research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
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