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651 - 660 of 772 results for: Medicine

PSYC 111Q: The Changing Face of "Mental Illness" in Women: Historical, Medical and Artistic Approaches

In this seminar we want to take a look at women¿s lives beginning in the past century to the present and the many changes which occurred in conceptualizing and understanding mental illness. The female reproductive system has been linked to mental illness in women for centuries. The womb was believed to be the source of anxiety and depression, leading women to become `hysterical¿. But what does `hysteria¿ really mean, and how have historical and cultural attitudes towards women framed the study of women's mental health? How have the expectations of and demands on women and their role in society changed from the 19th to the 20th century? How have advances in health care and changing economic conditions influenced women¿s health? The course will introduce students to historical and current concepts of mental illness in women. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS), eating disorders, the hysterias and functional neurologic disorders and infertility and postpartum depression will be analyzed more »
In this seminar we want to take a look at women¿s lives beginning in the past century to the present and the many changes which occurred in conceptualizing and understanding mental illness. The female reproductive system has been linked to mental illness in women for centuries. The womb was believed to be the source of anxiety and depression, leading women to become `hysterical¿. But what does `hysteria¿ really mean, and how have historical and cultural attitudes towards women framed the study of women's mental health? How have the expectations of and demands on women and their role in society changed from the 19th to the 20th century? How have advances in health care and changing economic conditions influenced women¿s health? The course will introduce students to historical and current concepts of mental illness in women. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS), eating disorders, the hysterias and functional neurologic disorders and infertility and postpartum depression will be analyzed through a historical bio-psycho-social lens. Historical reading will include primary sources, such as women¿s diaries and physicians¿ casebooks and medical case records, as well as secondary sources such as advice books, and 19th- and 20th-century medical texts. Guest speakers from the art history and literature departments will stimulate dialogue regarding literary and artistic images and the social and cultural contexts of these disorders. Importantly, we will examine the changing face of "mental illness in women" in art, literature and medicine--the evolution of diversity in represented voices and the current methods of researching and treating the interface between the female reproductive cycle and psychiatric illness in diverse populations of women. Embedded within each lecture will be break-out sessions with opportunities for students to ask questions and to discuss a topic in greater depth. Students will have the opportunity to complete their own interdisciplinary projects for the course. Prior projects have included not only power point presentations of diverse topics, but also short films and stories, and future women's mental health research project proposals.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

PSYC 139: Understanding Relationships: A Couples and Family Therapy Perspective (PSYC 239)

Considers the premises of the family-systems approach to intimate and family relationships, drawing on concepts from psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, anthropology, and organizational behavior. Examines relationship formation and commitment, intimacy and sexuality, family development and structure, interpersonal conflict and communication, historical patterns and legacies, gender and power, and the cultural and larger systemic contexts of close relationships. Frameworks for assessing relationships and tools for changing romantic, family, and social relationships are examined in detail, and case examples illustrate the relationship change strategies of major contributors to the field. Highlights practical applications of the family-systems approach in educational, medical, business, and community settings. Students do not need to have a background in Psychology or Human Biology, and all student levels are welcome (including GSB, Law, Medicine, GSE for PSYC 239).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Rait, D. (PI)

PSYC 213: Policy Practicum: Alcohol Use Among Stanford Undergraduates

(Same as LAW 806L) Client: Stanford University Vice Provost of Student Affairs, https://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/who-we-are/vice-provost-student-affairs. Excessive alcohol consumption among Stanford undergraduates creates ahealth, educational, social, and legal problems for drinkers and for other members of the Stanford community. With the Vice Provost for Student Affairs as the client, this Policy Lab practicum explores the causes, consequences, and practical evidence to assess and address the problem. The interdisciplinary research team will examine practices and data at Stanford and other academic institutions in the context of scholarly studies and general knowledge from medicine, law, psychology, and other social sciences. As one component of formal policy research methods, the team will conduct ethnographic interviews with stakeholders. Upper-division and graduate students from Law, Medicine, Public Policy, and social science disciplines are especially encouraged to apply. L more »
(Same as LAW 806L) Client: Stanford University Vice Provost of Student Affairs, https://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/who-we-are/vice-provost-student-affairs. Excessive alcohol consumption among Stanford undergraduates creates ahealth, educational, social, and legal problems for drinkers and for other members of the Stanford community. With the Vice Provost for Student Affairs as the client, this Policy Lab practicum explores the causes, consequences, and practical evidence to assess and address the problem. The interdisciplinary research team will examine practices and data at Stanford and other academic institutions in the context of scholarly studies and general knowledge from medicine, law, psychology, and other social sciences. As one component of formal policy research methods, the team will conduct ethnographic interviews with stakeholders. Upper-division and graduate students from Law, Medicine, Public Policy, and social science disciplines are especially encouraged to apply. Law students wishing to undertake R credit will perform additional research for a full report analyzing the issues and results of the collective research. R credit is possible only by consent of the instructor. After the term begins, and with the consent of the instructor, students accepted into the course may transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

PSYC 215: Introduction to Psychedelic Medicine

The re-emergence of psychedelics in the academic arena has yielded insights which may profoundly impact our understanding of brain, mind, and the treatment of mental illness. This course will survey ongoing and developing clinical applications and scientific investigations of psychedelics and psychedelic-assisted treatments. Neuroscientific, immunological, and psychological perspectives will be discussed, as well as the historical, legal, and cultural aspects of psychedelic medicine. Presentations will be given by the field's scientists and therapists at the front line. Attendees will be able to engage directly with investigators and clinicians in the field during the course. Course may be taken for one unit (lecture, 6pm - 7pm) or students may attend additional discussion section (7pm - 8pm) for two units
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 226: Asian-American Culture and Medicine

In this lunch talk series, students will explore the interaction of Asian-American culture and the practice of medicine, through personal and professional perspectives and narractives of physicians and others in healthcare. Topics will vary form year to year, including Asian-American influences on providers, medical trainees, patients, populations, the doctor-patient relationship, and diseases. A particular emphasis will be placed on mental health and the psychology of Asian-American culture. Of note, this course may touch on sensitive topics in mental health including suicide, psychosis, addiction, child abuse, sexual assault, violence, and mental disorders. Priority will be given to MD students. Students not in the MD program must obtain approval of the instructor to enroll.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 233: Mindfulness: An Awareness-Based Stress Reduction Program in Medicine

An experiential program in which the participants learn the techniques of mindfulness meditation and its application in the management of stress and in healthcare. Modeled after the MBSR, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, started by Jon Kabat-Zinn at UMASS Medical Center. Designed to work with the mind/body relationship to stress and chronic illness teaching open sensitive awareness without judgement of mental or physical reactivity. Requirement for the course is the daily practice of mindfulness meditation, attendance at weekly class meetings and the all day retreat, home reading, and a final paper covering the student's observations.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3

PSYC 239: Understanding Relationships: A Couples and Family Therapy Perspective (PSYC 139)

Considers the premises of the family-systems approach to intimate and family relationships, drawing on concepts from psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, anthropology, and organizational behavior. Examines relationship formation and commitment, intimacy and sexuality, family development and structure, interpersonal conflict and communication, historical patterns and legacies, gender and power, and the cultural and larger systemic contexts of close relationships. Frameworks for assessing relationships and tools for changing romantic, family, and social relationships are examined in detail, and case examples illustrate the relationship change strategies of major contributors to the field. Highlights practical applications of the family-systems approach in educational, medical, business, and community settings. Students do not need to have a background in Psychology or Human Biology, and all student levels are welcome (including GSB, Law, Medicine, GSE for PSYC 239).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Rait, D. (PI)

PSYC 277: Psychiatry and Behavioral Science Perspectives in Medicine

In this lunchtime discussion series (lunch provided), learners will explore a sampling of psychiatry and behavioral science topics relevant to medicine through the perspectives of attending psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, and other specialists in behavioral health from a variety of practice and research settings. Some examples of topics are advances in interventional psychiatry, psychopharmacology, and psychotherapy; the interplay between social issues and mental healthcare; and other matters affecting the modern practice of psychiatry. Note of warning, this course discusses sensitive topics in psychiatry including suicide, psychosis, addiction, child abuse, sexual assault, violence, and mental disorders. Priority will be given to MD students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 282: The Literature of Psychosis (ANTHRO 82P, HUMBIO 162L, PSYC 82)

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a complex concept. It can be terrifying and devastating for patients and families, and yet shares characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis. We will approach it from multiple perspectives, including clinical descriptions, works of art, and texts by writers ranging from Shakespeare, to the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, to patients attempting to describe their experience. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Mason, D. (PI)

PSYC 300A: Psychiatry Core Clerkship

Required Clerkship. Closed to visitors. The clerkship is designed to solidify the knowledge of psychiatry students have acquired in the Practice of Medicine courses, as students gain practical skills in the application of this knowledge to clinical situations. The focus is on interviewing skills, psychiatric evaluations, on refining diagnostic skills, and offers an overview of psychosocial and biological treatment modalities for the major psychiatric disorders. The clerkship consists of clinical work on inpatient units under the supervision of academic and clinical faculty, a weekly lecture series by academic faculty, interviewing seminars taught by voluntary clinical faculty, and attendance at Grand Rounds. Students are assigned to patient care settings at one of the six affiliated sites: a comprehensive medical psychiatry unit (G2), an inpatient general psychiatry ward (H2), a geriatric psychiatry unit, the consult-liaison service at Stanford Hospital, an inpatient research psychiatr more »
Required Clerkship. Closed to visitors. The clerkship is designed to solidify the knowledge of psychiatry students have acquired in the Practice of Medicine courses, as students gain practical skills in the application of this knowledge to clinical situations. The focus is on interviewing skills, psychiatric evaluations, on refining diagnostic skills, and offers an overview of psychosocial and biological treatment modalities for the major psychiatric disorders. The clerkship consists of clinical work on inpatient units under the supervision of academic and clinical faculty, a weekly lecture series by academic faculty, interviewing seminars taught by voluntary clinical faculty, and attendance at Grand Rounds. Students are assigned to patient care settings at one of the six affiliated sites: a comprehensive medical psychiatry unit (G2), an inpatient general psychiatry ward (H2), a geriatric psychiatry unit, the consult-liaison service at Stanford Hospital, an inpatient research psychiatric ward specializing in the study of schizophrenia or an acute locked psychiatric ward at the PAVA. In addition, students participate in the specialty outpatient clinics at Stanford including OCD, Child, bipolar, geriatric and general psychopharmacology clinics. Students are given the opportunity to express their preferences regarding assignment. The final rotation assignment is determined by the department based on availability of sites. Students are informed about the specific clerkship requirements at the orientation offered at the start of each clerkship period. They receive a course syllabus, several study guide books and a psychopharmacology textbook. Students are encouraged to visit the Psychiatry clerkship site on Coursework which contains all information, the syllabus and teaching materials. Students are expected to complete five cases on the CaseTool site and to record cases seen by diagnostic category. Requirements include mandatory attendance at seminars, weekly inpatient case history presentations and Emergency room experiences with residents/attending psychiatrists. The NBME Subject Exam in Psychiatry is a required component of the clerkship. Prereq: INDE 205. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 10 students per period (minimum of 3 students per period). Reporting Instructions: Where: 401 Quarry Rd., 2nd Floor, Room 2213; Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6 Call Code: 2, call once per week for the first 3 weeks or 3 nights total during 4 week clerkship period. Director: Charles DeBattista, M.D. (650-723-8324). Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6
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