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641 - 650 of 788 results for: Medicine

PEDS 303A: Pediatric Cardiology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The Pediatric Cardiology Clerkship provides students with a hemodynamic and developmental approach to the cardiovascular problems of childhood. Students actively participate in all pediatric cardiology activities in the clinic, the wards, and the ICUs of the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. The program emphasizes history-taking, physical examination, and interpretation of electrocardiograms and X-rays. Rotations include exposure to echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and electrophysiologic studies. Students will learn principles of medical and surgical therapy, and will have the opportunity to spend time in the operating room with the cardiology team. Prospective applicants should visit http://med.stanford.edu/clerkships/apply.html to begin the application process. PREREQUISITES: Pediatrics 300A. Visiting students must have completed a General Pediatrics clerkship equivalent to Pediatrics 300A, and a Gener more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The Pediatric Cardiology Clerkship provides students with a hemodynamic and developmental approach to the cardiovascular problems of childhood. Students actively participate in all pediatric cardiology activities in the clinic, the wards, and the ICUs of the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. The program emphasizes history-taking, physical examination, and interpretation of electrocardiograms and X-rays. Rotations include exposure to echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and electrophysiologic studies. Students will learn principles of medical and surgical therapy, and will have the opportunity to spend time in the operating room with the cardiology team. Prospective applicants should visit http://med.stanford.edu/clerkships/apply.html to begin the application process. PREREQUISITES: Pediatrics 300A. Visiting students must have completed a General Pediatrics clerkship equivalent to Pediatrics 300A, and a General Medicine clerkship equivalent to Medicine 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks, 1 student per period; additional students must be approved by the Clerkship Director. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Inger Olson, M.D. (650-723-7913). CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Alda Hernandez (aldavh1@stanford.edu, Cell: 408-605-4753, Office: 650-725-3161). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Students will receive reporting instructions via e-mail approximately 1 week prior to the beginning of their clerkship; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Stanford Pediatric Cardiology faculty. LOCATION: LPCH.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

PEDS 312A: Pediatric Infectious Diseases Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Students gain clinical experience working with patients with infectious diseases, including newborns, children, adolescents, and pediatric patients with underlying malignancies, immunological deficiencies, organ transplants, chronic illness and orthopedic problems. Clinical rounds are held daily and outpatient clinic is held once a week. General principles applicable to the management of infections in all age groups are emphasized, as well as basic ID-specific laboratory results such as cultures, antibiotics, susceptibility data and diagnostic studies. In addition, students participate in a variety of weekly didactic sessions, clinical conferences and laboratory rounds. Students also should attend the Pediatric Residency Program's Morning Report, Noon Didactics and Grand Rounds as the schedule allows. Opportunities exist to explore interests in antimicrobial stewardship, infection control and prevention, as well as o more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Students gain clinical experience working with patients with infectious diseases, including newborns, children, adolescents, and pediatric patients with underlying malignancies, immunological deficiencies, organ transplants, chronic illness and orthopedic problems. Clinical rounds are held daily and outpatient clinic is held once a week. General principles applicable to the management of infections in all age groups are emphasized, as well as basic ID-specific laboratory results such as cultures, antibiotics, susceptibility data and diagnostic studies. In addition, students participate in a variety of weekly didactic sessions, clinical conferences and laboratory rounds. Students also should attend the Pediatric Residency Program's Morning Report, Noon Didactics and Grand Rounds as the schedule allows. Opportunities exist to explore interests in antimicrobial stewardship, infection control and prevention, as well as other facets of being a Pediatric Infectious Disease specialist. PREREQUISITES: Pediatrics 300A and Medicine 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: David M. Vu, M.D., 650-498-9118, davidvu@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Kim Vo, 650-736-2005, ktvo@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Stanford University Hospital, Peds ID Division Offices, Room G312. Contact Dr. Vu at davidvu@stanford.edu prior to start date; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 0 (no call or rounding on weekends). OTHER FACULTY: M. Amieva, S. Chen, D. Contopoulos-Ioannidis, E. Egan, D. LaBeaud, G. Lee, R. Mathew, S. Nadimpalli, H. Schwenk, N. Srinivas, D. Vu. LOCATION: LPCH.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

PEDS 313A: Neonatal Intensive Care Subinternship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: Medical students in their third or fourth clinical year are offered the opportunity to enrich their pediatric training in the 40-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) located on the 2nd floor of LPCH. The NICU offers an intensive experience in the management of premature and sick term neonates admitted from the delivery room, community physicians' offices, and an active referral service that draws from throughout Northern and mid-coastal California. The rotation emphasizes delivery room attendance and newborn resuscitation skills, daily management of common newborn problems, and the special follow-up needs of NICU graduates. Exposure to advanced therapies including mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide therapy, and hypothermia occurs routinely. An active maternal-fetal medicine service, pediatric surgery, and various pediatric subspecialty services support the NICU. Students w more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: Medical students in their third or fourth clinical year are offered the opportunity to enrich their pediatric training in the 40-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) located on the 2nd floor of LPCH. The NICU offers an intensive experience in the management of premature and sick term neonates admitted from the delivery room, community physicians' offices, and an active referral service that draws from throughout Northern and mid-coastal California. The rotation emphasizes delivery room attendance and newborn resuscitation skills, daily management of common newborn problems, and the special follow-up needs of NICU graduates. Exposure to advanced therapies including mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide therapy, and hypothermia occurs routinely. An active maternal-fetal medicine service, pediatric surgery, and various pediatric subspecialty services support the NICU. Students work under direct supervision of housestaff, nurse practitioners, fellows and faculty, and assume gradual responsibility for patient care as dictated by performance as the rotation progresses. Students must obtain approval from Meghan Stawitcke prior to registering for this clerkship. Please email requests to meghans4@stanford.edu. Additional information for visiting students: Visiting students must have completed an inpatient pediatrics rotation prior to starting this clerkship. Approval from the clerkship director at the home institution is required prior to enrollment. Please contact Meghan Stawitcke, meghans4@stanford.edu for information about the approval process. Website for Visiting Student: http://med.stanford.edu/clerkships.html. PREREQUISITES: Peds 300A and Anesthesia 306A/P. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks, 1 student per period. NOTE: enrollment is coordinated with Anes 306P and capped at no more than 2 students in the NICU per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Lisa Charo Bain, M.D., lisa.c.bain@gmail.com. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Meghan Stawitcke, 650-724-9954. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Intensive Care Nursery (Attending Physician or on-service Fellow); Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 4 - Call is every 4th night until 11pm, no overnight call. OTHER FACULTY: LPCH NICU faculty. LOCATION: LPCH.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

PEDS 315A: Adolescent Medicine

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: This three week elective has a focus on the health of adolescents and young adults. During this elective, you will rotate through an outpatient eating disorder clinic and an inpatient eating disorder unit. This is an excellent opportunity to participate in a multi-disciplinary, nationally recognized program for the care of adolescents with eating disorders. You will also participate in a novel inpatient reproductive health consult service for adolescents. Additionally, there may be opportunities to rotate through primary care teen clinics and community outreach teen clinics. A requirement of the rotation is to prepare a twenty minute talk on a topic of interest in adolescent medicine. The talk will be given during the last week of the rotation. Biweekly teaching conferences by faculty supplement the curriculum. Clinics are located at several different locations, so access to transportation, ideally with a car, is more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: This three week elective has a focus on the health of adolescents and young adults. During this elective, you will rotate through an outpatient eating disorder clinic and an inpatient eating disorder unit. This is an excellent opportunity to participate in a multi-disciplinary, nationally recognized program for the care of adolescents with eating disorders. You will also participate in a novel inpatient reproductive health consult service for adolescents. Additionally, there may be opportunities to rotate through primary care teen clinics and community outreach teen clinics. A requirement of the rotation is to prepare a twenty minute talk on a topic of interest in adolescent medicine. The talk will be given during the last week of the rotation. Biweekly teaching conferences by faculty supplement the curriculum. Clinics are located at several different locations, so access to transportation, ideally with a car, is highly recommended. PREREQUISITES: Pediatrics 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 3-12, 14-16, full-time for three weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Jonathan Avila, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Ana Valdez-Fraser (650-736-9557). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Review schedule sent via e-mail by coordinator prior to clerkship; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: A. Anoshiravani, J. Avila, J. Carlson, N. Golden, R. Goldstein, C. Kapphahn, M. Vo. LOCATION: LPCH.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

PEDS 336E: Subinternship in Community Hospital Pediatrics

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: This sub-internship will introduce to the experienced student the challenges of community pediatric hospital medicine in a resource-limited community. Patients in this hospital are primarily Spanish-speaking. Medical interpretation is available. Sub-interns will work directly with attendings caring for well newborns, infants in a Level 2 NICU, hospitalized children, and will also consult on children in the emergency department. Significant autonomy will be provided to students demonstrating capacity. Watsonville Community Hospital is in Santa Cruz County. Weekends are duty-free. Students interested in enrolling should contact the clerkship director or coordinator to discuss timing. Students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from Clerkship Director before registering. PREREQUISITES: Pediatrics 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: This sub-internship will introduce to the experienced student the challenges of community pediatric hospital medicine in a resource-limited community. Patients in this hospital are primarily Spanish-speaking. Medical interpretation is available. Sub-interns will work directly with attendings caring for well newborns, infants in a Level 2 NICU, hospitalized children, and will also consult on children in the emergency department. Significant autonomy will be provided to students demonstrating capacity. Watsonville Community Hospital is in Santa Cruz County. Weekends are duty-free. Students interested in enrolling should contact the clerkship director or coordinator to discuss timing. Students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from Clerkship Director before registering. PREREQUISITES: Pediatrics 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Carmin Powell, M.D. (cpowell@stanford.edu). CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Theresa Kramer (tckramer@stanford.edu). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Watsonville Community Hospital Main Lobby, 75 Nielson Street, Watsonville, CA 95076; Time: 7:00 am. CALL CODE: 2 (one night per week in-hospital). OTHER FACULTY: D. Finnigan, N. McNamara, C. Powell, D. Takahashi. LOCATION: Watsonville Community Hospital.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5

PHIL 30: Democracy Matters (ECON 4, POLISCI 42, PUBLPOL 4)

Should the U.S. close its border to immigrants? What are the ramifications of income inequality? How has COVID-19 changed life as we know it? Why are Americans so politically polarized? How can we address racial injustice? As the 2020 election approaches, faculty members from across Stanford will explore and examine some of the biggest challenges facing society today. Each week will be dedicated to a different topic, ranging from health care and the economy to racial injustice and challenges to democracy. Faculty with expertise in philosophy, economics, law, political science, psychology, medicine, history, and more will come together for lively conversations about the issues not only shaping this election season but also the nation and world at large. There will also be a Q&A following the initial discussion. Attendance and supplemental course readings are the only requirements for the course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

PHIL 85: Topics in Philosophy of Medicine

In this course, we will address major issues in philosophy and medicine. Some topics will be well-known within the practice of medicine: informed consent, advanced directives, medical trials. Other topics will be more familiar to philosophers: the concept of health, self-deception, social construction of disability, visualizations of illness. We will do our best to interpolate these discourses, by combining readings in medical ethics with philosophical essays.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Jackson, G. (PI)

PHIL 164A: Central Topics in Philosophy of Science: Causation (PHIL 264A)

(Graduate Students register for 264A.) Establishing causes in science, engineering, and medicine versus establishing them in Anglo-American law, considered in the context of Hume and Mill on causation. May be repeated for credit.
| Repeatable for credit

PHIL 175A: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER

PHIL 264A: Central Topics in Philosophy of Science: Causation (PHIL 164A)

(Graduate Students register for 264A.) Establishing causes in science, engineering, and medicine versus establishing them in Anglo-American law, considered in the context of Hume and Mill on causation. May be repeated for credit.
| Repeatable for credit
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