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631 - 640 of 772 results for: Medicine

PEDS 246SI: Diverse Perspectives on Disabilities

This course investigates disabilities and how they impact the lives of individuals and their communities. Students will learn various perspectives on disability from a wide range of speakers, including fellow students, parents, professionals, and professors of medicine, law, and education. Generally, the first hour of class will focus on an interactive lecture or panel, and the remaining 20 minutes will be reserved for discussions. The two-unit option is available for students interested in doing a community volunteering project through Kids with Dreams.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Feldman, H. (PI)

PEDS 251B: Medical Ethics II

The integration of ethical theory with applications of theory or conceptual issues in medicine, health care, and the life and social sciences. Topic varies by year. Possible topics include: ethical issues in stem cell research; death and dying; genetics and ethics; concepts of health and disease; the ethics of international research; and ethical implications of new reproductive technology.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

PEDS 263: Healthcare Operations Management (MS&E 263)

US health care spending is approximately 18% of GDP, growing rapidly, and driven in large part by prices and waste rather than quality and access. New approaches for improving health care delivery are urgently needed. This class focuses on the use of analytical tools to support efficient health care delivery. Topics include case studies on capacity planning, resource allocation, and scheduling. Methods include queueing, optimization, and simulation. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of Excel, probability, and optimization. For students in the Schools of Medicine, Business, and Law the course includes a variant of the curriculum with less emphasis on the technical material.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

PEDS 282: Pregnancy, Birth, and Infancy (OBGYN 282)

Comprehensive clinical experience where pre-clinical medical students follow pregnant women receiving care at Stanford hospitals to attend prenatal visits, delivery, and postnatal visits. Continuity clinic format, combined with didactic lessons and discussion seminars. Students are exposed to clinical activities in a meaningful context, bolstering classroom studies in anatomy, physiology, embryology and human development, and emphasizing social, economic, and personal issues related to medicine. This program spans one quarter, covering topics related to pregnancy, labor and delivery and newborn care. Students are expected to be engaged in the clinical experiences throughout the quarter and attend the weekly 2-hour seminar. Prerequisite: pre-clinical medical student or physician assistant student. Course directors: Janelle Aby, MD and Yasser El-Sayed, MD. TAs: Jill Anderson (janders5@stanford.edu) and Jenny Tiskus (tiskus@stanford.edu).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

PEDS 301A: Medical Genetics Clerkship

Open to visitors. The clerkship provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of clinical genetics. Students have the opportunity to learn about a range of genetic disorders, genetic diagnostics methodologies and genetic counseling by participating in the evaluation of children and adults in the General Genetics Clinic, Metabolic Genetics Clinic, Down Syndrome clinic and Cleft & Craniofacial Center. Students are also encouraged to participate in the activities of the inpatient consult service. By special arrangement students may also observe in the Neurogenetics Clinic, Neurometabolic Clinic, Adult Cancer Genetic Risk-Assessment Clinic, Connective Tissue Disorder clinic, Differences of Sexual Development, or the Prenatal Genetic Counseling. For students with a particular interest in diagnostics and/or molecular pathology, additional time in biochemical genetics, cytogenetics and/or molecular genetics laboratories may be arranged. At the conclusion of the rotation students will del more »
Open to visitors. The clerkship provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of clinical genetics. Students have the opportunity to learn about a range of genetic disorders, genetic diagnostics methodologies and genetic counseling by participating in the evaluation of children and adults in the General Genetics Clinic, Metabolic Genetics Clinic, Down Syndrome clinic and Cleft & Craniofacial Center. Students are also encouraged to participate in the activities of the inpatient consult service. By special arrangement students may also observe in the Neurogenetics Clinic, Neurometabolic Clinic, Adult Cancer Genetic Risk-Assessment Clinic, Connective Tissue Disorder clinic, Differences of Sexual Development, or the Prenatal Genetic Counseling. For students with a particular interest in diagnostics and/or molecular pathology, additional time in biochemical genetics, cytogenetics and/or molecular genetics laboratories may be arranged. At the conclusion of the rotation students will deliver a presentation on a topic of their interest in genetic medicine. Visiting students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from the Clerkship Director before submitting their applications. Please email CV and a Statement of Interest to Dr. Heather Byers at hbyers@stanford.edu. Prereq: Pediatrics 300A or permission of director. nPeriods Avail: 2-12, full-time for two or four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: A071 or 730 Welch Road, Mary L. Johnson Clinic, Medicine Specialties at 8:00 am. Call Susan Schelley (650-725-6562) 1 week prior to arrival to review reporting instructions. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Heather Byers, M.D. (650-723-5303, hbyers@stanford.edu). Other Faculty: J. Bernstein, G. Enns, N. Gomez-Ospina, L. Hudgins, C. Lee, M. Manning, D. Matalon, D. Stevenson. nCoord: Susan Schelley (650-725-6562, schelley@stanford.edu), SUMC A071. (LPCH)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit

PEDS 303A: Pediatric Cardiology Clerkship

Open to visitors. The Pediatric Cardiology Clerkship provides students with a hemodynamic and developmental approach to the cardiovascular problems of childhood. Students actively participate in all pediatric cardiology activities in the clinic, the wards, and the ICUs of the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. The program emphasizes history-taking, physical examination, and interpretation of electrocardiograms and X-rays. Rotations include exposure to echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and electrophysiologic studies. Students will learn principles of medical and surgical therapy, and will have the opportunity to spend time in the operating room with the cardiology team. Prospective applicants should visit http://med.stanford.edu/clerkships/apply.html to begin the application process. Prereq: Pediatrics 300A. Visiting students must have completed a General Pediatrics clerkship equivalent to Pediatrics 300A, and a General Medicine clerkship equivalent to Medicine 300A. Periods more »
Open to visitors. The Pediatric Cardiology Clerkship provides students with a hemodynamic and developmental approach to the cardiovascular problems of childhood. Students actively participate in all pediatric cardiology activities in the clinic, the wards, and the ICUs of the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. The program emphasizes history-taking, physical examination, and interpretation of electrocardiograms and X-rays. Rotations include exposure to echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and electrophysiologic studies. Students will learn principles of medical and surgical therapy, and will have the opportunity to spend time in the operating room with the cardiology team. Prospective applicants should visit http://med.stanford.edu/clerkships/apply.html to begin the application process. Prereq: Pediatrics 300A. Visiting students must have completed a General Pediatrics clerkship equivalent to Pediatrics 300A, and a General Medicine clerkship equivalent to Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: Periods 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period; additional students must be approved by the Clerkship Director. Reporting Instructions: Students will receive reporting instructions via e-mail approximately 1 week prior to the beginning of their clerkship. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Inger Olson, M.D. (650-723-7913). Other Faculty: Stanford Pediatric Cardiology faculty. Coord: Alda Hernandez (aldavh1@stanford.edu, Cell: 408-605-4753, Office: 650-725-3161). (LPCH)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

PEDS 312A: Pediatric Infectious Disease Clerkship

Open to visitors. Students gain clinical experience working with patients with infectious diseases, including newborns, children, adolescents, and pediatric patients with underlying malignancies, immunological deficiencies, organ transplants, chronic illness and orthopedic problems. Clinical rounds are held daily and outpatient clinic is held once a week. General principles applicable to the management of infections in all age groups are emphasized, as well as basic ID-specific laboratory results such as cultures, antibiotics, susceptibility data and diagnostic studies. In addition, students participate in a variety of weekly didactic sessions, clinical conferences and laboratory rounds. Students also should attend the Pediatric Residency Program¿s Morning Report, Noon Didactics and Grand Rounds as the schedule allows. Opportunities exist to explore interests in antimicrobial stewardship, infection control and prevention, as well as other facets of being a Pediatric Infectious Disease more »
Open to visitors. Students gain clinical experience working with patients with infectious diseases, including newborns, children, adolescents, and pediatric patients with underlying malignancies, immunological deficiencies, organ transplants, chronic illness and orthopedic problems. Clinical rounds are held daily and outpatient clinic is held once a week. General principles applicable to the management of infections in all age groups are emphasized, as well as basic ID-specific laboratory results such as cultures, antibiotics, susceptibility data and diagnostic studies. In addition, students participate in a variety of weekly didactic sessions, clinical conferences and laboratory rounds. Students also should attend the Pediatric Residency Program¿s Morning Report, Noon Didactics and Grand Rounds as the schedule allows. Opportunities exist to explore interests in antimicrobial stewardship, infection control and prevention, as well as other facets of being a Pediatric Infectious Disease specialist. Prereq: Pediatrics 300A and Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. nReporting Instructions: Where: Stanford University Hospital, Peds ID Division Offices, Room G312; Time: 8:30 am. Contact Dr. Vu at davidvu@stanford.edu prior to start date. Units: 6. Call Code: 0 (no call or rounding on weekends). nDirector: David M. Vu, M.D. (650-498-9118, davidvu@stanford.edu). Other Faculty: M. Amieva, S. Chen, D. Contopoulos-Ioannidis, E. Egan, D. LaBeaud, G. Lee, R. Mathew, S. Nadimpalli, H. Schwenk, N. Srinivas, D. Vu. nCoord: Kim Vo (650-736-2005, ktvo@stanford.edu). (LPCH)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

PEDS 313A: Neonatal Intensive Care Subinternship

Selective 2. Open to visitors. Medical students in their third or fourth clinical year are offered the opportunity to enrich their pediatric training in the 40-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) located on the 2nd floor of LPCH. The NICU offers an intensive experience in the management of premature and sick term neonates admitted from the delivery room, community physicians¿ offices, and an active referral service that draws from throughout Northern and mid-coastal California. The rotation emphasizes delivery room attendance and newborn resuscitation skills, daily management of common newborn problems, and the special follow-up needs of NICU graduates. Exposure to advanced therapies including mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide therapy, and hypothermia occurs routinely. An active maternal-fetal medicine service, pediatric surgery, and various pediatric subspecialty services support the NICU. Students work under direct supervision of housestaff more »
Selective 2. Open to visitors. Medical students in their third or fourth clinical year are offered the opportunity to enrich their pediatric training in the 40-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) located on the 2nd floor of LPCH. The NICU offers an intensive experience in the management of premature and sick term neonates admitted from the delivery room, community physicians¿ offices, and an active referral service that draws from throughout Northern and mid-coastal California. The rotation emphasizes delivery room attendance and newborn resuscitation skills, daily management of common newborn problems, and the special follow-up needs of NICU graduates. Exposure to advanced therapies including mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide therapy, and hypothermia occurs routinely. An active maternal-fetal medicine service, pediatric surgery, and various pediatric subspecialty services support the NICU. Students work under direct supervision of housestaff, nurse practitioners, fellows and faculty, and assume gradual responsibility for patient care as dictated by performance as the rotation progresses. Students must obtain approval from Meghan Stawitcke prior to registering for this clerkship. Please email requests to meghans4@stanford.edu. Additional information for visiting students: Visiting students must have completed an inpatient pediatrics rotation prior to starting this clerkship. Approval from the clerkship director at the home institution is required prior to enrollment. Please contact Meghan Stawitcke (meghans4@stanford.edu) for information about the approval process. Website for Visiting Student: http://med.stanford.edu/clerkships.html Prereq: Peds 300A and Anesthesia 306A/P. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. NOTE: enrollment is coordinated with Anes306P and capped at no more than 2 students in the NICU per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Intensive Care Nursery (Attending Physician or on-service Fellow); Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 2 - Call is every 4th night until 11pm, no overnight call. Director: Lisa Charo Bain, M.D. (lisa.c.bain@gmail.com). Other Faculty: LPCH NICU faculty. Coord: Meghan Stawitcke (650-724-9954). (LPCH)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

PEDS 315A: Adolescent Medicine

Selective 1. Open to visitors. This one month elective has a focus on the health of adolescents and young adults. During this elective, you will rotate through an outpatient eating disorder clinic and an inpatient eating disorder unit. This is an excellent opportunity to participate in a multi-disciplinary, nationally recognized program for the care of adolescents with eating disorders. You will also participate in a novel inpatient reproductive health consult service for adolescents. Additionally, there may be opportunities to rotate through primary care teen clinics and community outreach teen clinics. A requirement of the rotation is to prepare a twenty minute talk on a topic of interest in adolescent medicine. The talk will be given during the last week of the rotation. Biweekly teaching conferences by faculty supplement the curriculum. Clinics are located at several different locations, so access to transportation, ideally with a car, is highly recommended. Prereq: Pediatrics 300A more »
Selective 1. Open to visitors. This one month elective has a focus on the health of adolescents and young adults. During this elective, you will rotate through an outpatient eating disorder clinic and an inpatient eating disorder unit. This is an excellent opportunity to participate in a multi-disciplinary, nationally recognized program for the care of adolescents with eating disorders. You will also participate in a novel inpatient reproductive health consult service for adolescents. Additionally, there may be opportunities to rotate through primary care teen clinics and community outreach teen clinics. A requirement of the rotation is to prepare a twenty minute talk on a topic of interest in adolescent medicine. The talk will be given during the last week of the rotation. Biweekly teaching conferences by faculty supplement the curriculum. Clinics are located at several different locations, so access to transportation, ideally with a car, is highly recommended. Prereq: Pediatrics 300A. Periods Avail: 1-8, 10-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Review schedule sent via e-mail by coordinator prior to clerkship. Units: 6. Call Code: 0.Director: Katherine Hill, M.D. Other Faculty: J. Carlson, N. Golden, R. Goldstein, C. Kapphahn, M. Vo. nCoord: Ana Valdez-Fraser (650-736-9557). (LPCH)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

PEDS 336E: Subinternship in Community Hospital Pediatrics

Selective 2. Open to visitors. This sub-internship will introduce to the experienced student the challenges of community pediatric hospital medicine in a resource-limited community. Patients in this hospital are primarily Spanish-speaking. Medical interpretation is available. Sub-interns will work directly with attendings caring for well newborns, infants in a Level 2 NICU, hospitalized children, and will also consult on children in the emergency department. Significant autonomy will be provided to students demonstrating capacity. Watsonville Community Hospital is in Santa Cruz County. Housing is provided in Capitola but students need a car. Weekends are duty-free. Students interested in enrolling should contact the clerkship director or coordinator to discuss timing. Students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from Clerkship Director before registering. Prereq: Pediatrics 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instruc more »
Selective 2. Open to visitors. This sub-internship will introduce to the experienced student the challenges of community pediatric hospital medicine in a resource-limited community. Patients in this hospital are primarily Spanish-speaking. Medical interpretation is available. Sub-interns will work directly with attendings caring for well newborns, infants in a Level 2 NICU, hospitalized children, and will also consult on children in the emergency department. Significant autonomy will be provided to students demonstrating capacity. Watsonville Community Hospital is in Santa Cruz County. Housing is provided in Capitola but students need a car. Weekends are duty-free. Students interested in enrolling should contact the clerkship director or coordinator to discuss timing. Students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from Clerkship Director before registering. Prereq: Pediatrics 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Watsonville Community Hospital Main Lobby, 75 Nielson Street, Watsonville, CA 95076; Time: 7:00 am Units: 6. Call Code: 2 (one night per week in-hospital) Director: Eric Foote, M.D. (eric.foote@stanford.edu) Other Faculty: D. Finnigan, N. McNamara, C. Powell, D. Takahashi. Coord: Theresa Kramer (650-498-2679, tckramer@stanford.edu) (Watsonville Community Hospital)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6
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