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591 - 600 of 772 results for: Medicine

ORTHO 120: Introduction to Lifestyle Medicine (ORTHO 220)

Lifestyle medicine is an exciting new movement to empower practicing clinicians and aspiring physicians to facilitate behavioral change and promote a culture of health and wellness in patients. Focus is on both concrete, evidence-based findings and tangible, practical tools to readily translate into everyday clinical practice. A series of leading experts and guest lectures guide students through interactive, patient-focused activities in topics including, but not limited to: nutrition, exercise, sleep, motivational interviewing, meditation, and acupuncture. Students enrolling for 2 units use a fitness and lifestyle monitoring wristband and prepare a report on your results.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

ORTHO 210: Practical Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Exam (ORTHO 110)

Designed for students considering a career in sports medicine, orthopaedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice, or physical therapy. Focus is on diagnosis and treatment of the most common injuries encountered in sports medicine, from head to toe and from acute trauma to chronic overuse. Students gain competence performing an efficient sports medicine exam, developing a differential diagnosis, and a treatment plan on how to safely return athletes back to their sport. Focused physical exam skills are taught for the neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, low back, hip, knee, leg, ankle and foot. Most sessions consist of anatomy review, case discussion, and hands-on exam practice in small groups. A few sessions cover specific hot topics in sports medicine such as concussion, athletic heart syndrome, and advanced performance techniques. Students enrolling for two units prepare an in-class presentation or short review paper.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2

ORTHO 220: Introduction to Lifestyle Medicine (ORTHO 120)

Lifestyle medicine is an exciting new movement to empower practicing clinicians and aspiring physicians to facilitate behavioral change and promote a culture of health and wellness in patients. Focus is on both concrete, evidence-based findings and tangible, practical tools to readily translate into everyday clinical practice. A series of leading experts and guest lectures guide students through interactive, patient-focused activities in topics including, but not limited to: nutrition, exercise, sleep, motivational interviewing, meditation, and acupuncture. Students enrolling for 2 units use a fitness and lifestyle monitoring wristband and prepare a report on your results.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

ORTHO 303C: Clinical Clerkship in Rehabilitation Medicine

Selective 1. Open to visitors. The Rehabilitation Center at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC) is a national leader in the advancement of rehabilitation and a core training site for the Stanford Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Residency (PM&R) program. The Rehabilitation Center at SCVMC is accredited by the Commission of the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities, and we have treated individuals with brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, and other disabling neurological conditions since 1971. Our clerkship emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to the patient severely disabled by acute spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke, major trauma, and other neurologic disabilities. Concentration is on clinical evaluation, prevention of complications and participation in long-term planning for maximum independence and improving the quality of life for the patient.nThe student functions integrally as a member of the treatment team and participates in all aspects of more »
Selective 1. Open to visitors. The Rehabilitation Center at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC) is a national leader in the advancement of rehabilitation and a core training site for the Stanford Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Residency (PM&R) program. The Rehabilitation Center at SCVMC is accredited by the Commission of the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities, and we have treated individuals with brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, and other disabling neurological conditions since 1971. Our clerkship emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to the patient severely disabled by acute spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke, major trauma, and other neurologic disabilities. Concentration is on clinical evaluation, prevention of complications and participation in long-term planning for maximum independence and improving the quality of life for the patient.nThe student functions integrally as a member of the treatment team and participates in all aspects of patient care, including acute admissions of spinal cord-injured patients, multidisciplinary evaluations of new admissions, patient care rounds, teaching and team conferences, therapy sessions, formal case presentations, neuroscience grand rounds, journal club and didactic lectures. The team approach, using multiple medical and therapeutic modalities, is key to our patients¿ success. Students will observe and participate in routinely performed procedures that aide in optimizing function including peripheral joint injections, chemodenervation, peripheral nerve blocks and intrathecal baclofen pump management for spasticity. Additionally, they may participate in electrodiagnostic studies that aide in diagnosis of peripheral nervous system pathology. Students may also have the opportunity to study the lifestyles of outpatients when they return to the community, investigate community resources and assess the ongoing medical issues of individuals with disabilities in PM&R outpatient clinics. Clerkships are available in spinal cord injury, brain injury, inpatient consults, and outpatient PM&R clinics and must be scheduled in advance by calling the clerkship coordinator listed below before registering. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Will accept third and fourth year students. Periods Avail: 1-12, full time for four or eight weeks. Space is limited. Reporting Instructions: Where: SCVMC, Room 1A012 (Sobrato Pavilion) Visitors call (408) 885-2100. Proof of PPD, Rubella and malpractice insurance required. Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6 or 12. Call Code: 0. Director: James Crew, M.D. Other Faculty: J. Crew, K. Shem, S. McKenna, M. Mian, E. Chaw, T. Duong, H. Huie, E. Huang, R. Wang, P. Varma. Coordinator: Teresa Goodman (408) 885-2030
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit

ORTHO 304A: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Typically students spend time at the Palo Alto VA doing both inpatient and outpatient PM&R, and often we can accommodate preferences for exposure to a given VA PM&R service. The polytrauma rehabilitation center is one of five national centers that treat active duty military patients. Students may also request time at the VA¿s dedicated spinal cord injury inpatient service, at outpatient musculoskeletal clinics, at the electromyography clinic and at prosthetics clinic. Often, we can facilitate time on the Stanford inpatient PM&R consultation service or at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center on inpatient and/or outpatient. Sometimes we can arrange for a half day of at the Stanford Redwood City clinics observing interventional spine or sports. For Stanford students, this rotation may fulfill your selective 1 or elective requirements. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval before applying for this clerkship. To request approval, please contact Erin more »
Selective 1. Open to visitors. Typically students spend time at the Palo Alto VA doing both inpatient and outpatient PM&R, and often we can accommodate preferences for exposure to a given VA PM&R service. The polytrauma rehabilitation center is one of five national centers that treat active duty military patients. Students may also request time at the VA¿s dedicated spinal cord injury inpatient service, at outpatient musculoskeletal clinics, at the electromyography clinic and at prosthetics clinic. Often, we can facilitate time on the Stanford inpatient PM&R consultation service or at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center on inpatient and/or outpatient. Sometimes we can arrange for a half day of at the Stanford Redwood City clinics observing interventional spine or sports. For Stanford students, this rotation may fulfill your selective 1 or elective requirements. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval before applying for this clerkship. To request approval, please contact Erin Nelligan at erin8@stanford.edu. We are often able to accommodate visiting students whose medical school calendars don¿t align with the Stanford calendar, so please let Erin Nelligan know if you wish to rotate off-cycle. Prereq: None. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for two or four weeks. 3 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Outpatient Clinic; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 3 or 6. Call Code: 2 (Weekend and overnight call) Director: Theodore Scott, M.D. Other Faculty: L. Huynh, N. Karandikar, R. Klima, E. Kraus, J. Levin, M. Smuck, M. Timmerman, M. Kim. Coord: Erin Nelligan (650) 721-7627, Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center. (SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit

ORTHO 306A: Orthopedics Clerkship

Selective 1. Closed to visitors. Students will rotate two weeks at Stanford and two weeks at either Palo Alto Veterans Administration (PAVA) or Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC). This clerkship teaches students (1) how to take the basic orthopedic history and perform a physical examination of the musculoskeletal system; (2) how to diagnose and treat common adult orthopedic problems; (3) the basics of fracture treatment, including cast application; (4) the basic principles of total joint replacement surgery; and (5) the management of postoperative orthopedic patients. Students are assigned to Arthritis/Joints, Foot/Ankle, Hand, Peds, Shoulder/Elbow, Spine, Sports, Trauma or Tumor service, attend daily rounds and clinics, and go to the operating room. Students must attend all regularly scheduled conferences. While on the Stanford rotation outpatient clinics will take place at the Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center (SMOC) in Redwood City and surgeries will be at either the main c more »
Selective 1. Closed to visitors. Students will rotate two weeks at Stanford and two weeks at either Palo Alto Veterans Administration (PAVA) or Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC). This clerkship teaches students (1) how to take the basic orthopedic history and perform a physical examination of the musculoskeletal system; (2) how to diagnose and treat common adult orthopedic problems; (3) the basics of fracture treatment, including cast application; (4) the basic principles of total joint replacement surgery; and (5) the management of postoperative orthopedic patients. Students are assigned to Arthritis/Joints, Foot/Ankle, Hand, Peds, Shoulder/Elbow, Spine, Sports, Trauma or Tumor service, attend daily rounds and clinics, and go to the operating room. Students must attend all regularly scheduled conferences. While on the Stanford rotation outpatient clinics will take place at the Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center (SMOC) in Redwood City and surgeries will be at either the main campus or Redwood City location depending on the service. Prereq: Surgery 300A. nPeriods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 12 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Stanford Hospital, Location to be provided; Time: 7:00 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 4. Director: Steven L. Frick, M.D. Other Faculty: T. Alamin, D. Amanatullah, R. Avedian, M. Bellino, J. Bishop, I. Cheng, E. Cheung, L. Chou, C. Chu, J. Costouros, J. Dragoo, G. Fanton, S. Frick, J. Gamble, N. Giori, S. Goodman, S. Hu, J. Huddleston, M. Imrie, A. Ladd, D. Lowenberg, W. Maloney, T. McAdams, D. Mohler, A. Palanca, S. Pun, L. Rinsky, M. Safran, K. Wood, J. Yao, J. Young. Coord: Sue Gokey Gonzalez (650-721-7616), Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center, 450 Broadway Street - MC 6342, Redwood City, CA 94063. (SUMC, SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

ORTHO 318A: Sub-Internship in Orthopedics

Selective 2. Open to visitors. Students will rotate two weeks at Stanford University and two weeks at either Palo Alto Veterans Administration (PAVA) in Palo Alto, CA or Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC) in San Jose, CA. An in-patient and outpatient experience, intended for medical students in their final year who have completed a basic Orthopedics clerkship. Students build upon skills learned in the basic clerkship with increased responsibility; students perform primary workup of new patients, perform procedures such as: seeing patients and taking a basic orthopedic history, perform physical examination of the musculoskeletal system, improve their ability to manage complex patient presentations including diagnosing and treating common adult and pediatric orthopedic problems. Students are assigned to Arthritis/Joints, Foot/Ankle, Hand, Peds, Shoulder/Elbow, Spine, Sports, Trauma or Tumor service, attend daily rounds and clinics, and go to the operating room. Effort is made to a more »
Selective 2. Open to visitors. Students will rotate two weeks at Stanford University and two weeks at either Palo Alto Veterans Administration (PAVA) in Palo Alto, CA or Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC) in San Jose, CA. An in-patient and outpatient experience, intended for medical students in their final year who have completed a basic Orthopedics clerkship. Students build upon skills learned in the basic clerkship with increased responsibility; students perform primary workup of new patients, perform procedures such as: seeing patients and taking a basic orthopedic history, perform physical examination of the musculoskeletal system, improve their ability to manage complex patient presentations including diagnosing and treating common adult and pediatric orthopedic problems. Students are assigned to Arthritis/Joints, Foot/Ankle, Hand, Peds, Shoulder/Elbow, Spine, Sports, Trauma or Tumor service, attend daily rounds and clinics, and go to the operating room. Effort is made to accommodate student requests to be on a particular service. Students participate in daily care, take night call, and writes notes. The main O.R. and some conferences are located at the Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC). Students will attend Wednesday morning grand rounds and lectures each week, and will also have one hour of lecture per week dedicated to medical students. Students will attend any resident surgical skills labs scheduled during their rotation. During the rotation, students will meet with the Chairman and Residency Program Director, and will be interviewed for the Stanford Orthopaedic Residency program. Visiting students wishing to do this sub-I must receive prior approval before submitting their application to the School of Medicine. Please email to sgokey@stanford.edu your USMLE, school transcripts and CV and indicate the specific period for which you would like to be considered. Prereq: Successful completion of Ortho 306A and for visiting students, successful completion of your schools equivalent of an introductory orthopaedic course. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 12 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Stanford Hospital ¿ location to be provided. Time: 7:00 a.m. Units: 6. Call Code: 4. Director: Steven L. Frick, M.D. Other Faculty: T. Alamin, D. Amanatullah, R. Avedian, M. Bellino, J. Bishop, I. Cheng, E. Cheung, L. Chou, C. Chu, J. Costouros, J. Dragoo, G. Fanton, S. Frick J. Gamble, N. Giori, S. Goodman, S. Hu, J. Huddleston, , M. Imrie, A. Ladd, D. Lowenberg, W. Maloney, T. McAdams, D. Mohler, A. Palanca, S. Pun, L. Rinsky, M. Safran, K. Wood, J. Yao, J. Young. Coord: Sue Gokey Gonzalez (650-721-7616), Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center, 450 Broadway Street - MC 6342, Redwood City, CA 94063. (SUMC, SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

ORTHO 398A: Clinical Elective in Orthopedic Surgery

Closed to visitors. Provides an opportunity for a student in the clinical years to have a clinical experience in Orthopedic Surgery, of a quality and duration to be decided upon by the student and a faculty preceptor in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. Please note: Students cannot add 398A clerkships directly to their fishbowl schedules through the regular shuffles. Please contact Caroline Cheang in the Office of Medical Student Affairs at cheang@stanford.edu or 650-498-7619 with the faculty preceptor¿s name and email address to add this clerkship. Prereq: MED 208 or INDE 206. Periods Avail: 1-12. Reporting Instructions: Where: TBA (designated faculty preceptor); Time: TBA nUnits: 1 to 12. Call Code: 2 (varies according to preceptor) Director: Steven L. Frick, M.D. nOther Faculty: Staff Coord: Sue Gokey Gonzalez (650-721-7616), Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center, 450 Broadway Street - MC 6342, Redwood City, CA 94063. (SUMC, LPCH, SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit

OSPCPTWN 43: Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa

Introduction to concept of public health as compared with clinical medicine. Within a public health context, the broad distribution of health problems in sub-Saharan Africa as compared with U.S. and Europe. In light of South Africa's status as a new democracy, changes that have occurred in health legislation, policy, and service arenas in past 16 years. Topics include: sector health care delivery, current distribution of infectious and chronic diseases, and issues related to sexual and reproductive health in South Africa. Site visits to public sector health services and health related NGOs.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom

OSPFLOR 13: Galileo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Scientific Revolution in Italy

Italy was central to the Scientific Revolution during the Renaissance. The work of Galileo Galilei, Leonardo da Vinci, and others in Italy and across Europe, catalyzed the emergence of modern science, with profound changes in our worldview. The work of these Italians contributed to the rise of the scientific method, the development of modern sciences (especially astronomy, biology, physics, and mathematics), and the study of human anatomy and medicine. Technologic innovations, such as the telescope, microscope, accurate timepieces, and the printing press, were also pivotal for the Scientific Revolution. In this course we will explore the emergence of science and technology during the Renaissance and their connections to modern day scientific practice and principles, with a focus on key Italian pioneers. We will take advantage of Florence's location to visit museums and sites, and better appreciate their contributions to scientific methods and thinking.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Hlatky, M. (PI)
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