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581 - 590 of 772 results for: Medicine

NENS 204: Stroke Seminar

Standing at the intersection of many fields of medicine, including neurology, internal medicine, cerebrovascualr surgery, diagnostic and interventional radiology, and emergency medicine, stroke is a critical topic for all practitioners of medicine and is the third leading cause of death and disability, This seminar draws upon Stanford's leaders in stroke research to present and discuss the causes, presentation, treatment, and imaging characteristics of the disease.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

NENS 222: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD (DANCE 100)

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance cl more »
Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Repeatable for credit

NENS 308A: Adult Neurology Clerkship

Selective 2. Open to visitors and SCORE applicants. This clerkship provides an opportunity for students in the clinical years to have an advanced clinical experience in Adult Neurology. The student will be expected to perform at a "subinternship" level on the Stanford inpatient ward and/or inpatient consult service, where they will be evaluating often undifferentiated patients with neurologic symptoms and will have increased independence as a student member of the team. In rare circumstances, we may consider an outpatient specialty experience as space allows. In addition to this advanced clinical and professional role, the student will have an opportunity to be a near-peer mentor for the neurology clerkship students if they chose. This elective is often selected by those students interested in pursuing future residency training and career in Neurology or Neurosciences and is a 4 week rotation in which the schedule conforms to Stanford School of Medicine period dates. This clerkship req more »
Selective 2. Open to visitors and SCORE applicants. This clerkship provides an opportunity for students in the clinical years to have an advanced clinical experience in Adult Neurology. The student will be expected to perform at a "subinternship" level on the Stanford inpatient ward and/or inpatient consult service, where they will be evaluating often undifferentiated patients with neurologic symptoms and will have increased independence as a student member of the team. In rare circumstances, we may consider an outpatient specialty experience as space allows. In addition to this advanced clinical and professional role, the student will have an opportunity to be a near-peer mentor for the neurology clerkship students if they chose. This elective is often selected by those students interested in pursuing future residency training and career in Neurology or Neurosciences and is a 4 week rotation in which the schedule conforms to Stanford School of Medicine period dates. This clerkship requires completion of the Required Neurology Clerkship at Stanford ( NENS301A) or an equivalent neurology clerkship from an outside institution. In addition, prior approval by Clerkship Director is required. Visiting students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from Clerkship Director before submitting an application. Prereq: A prior Neurology clerkship and advance approval by the Clerkship Director. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Students must adhere to rotating on the predefined Stanford rotation period dates. Reporting Instructions: TBA. Units: 6. Call Code: 1 (No call, but rounds on weekends). Director: Veronica Santini, M.D., M.A. (954-632-8899, santiniv@stanford.edu) Other Faculty: Neurology, Neurosurgery and Neuro Pediatrics. Coord: Christine Hopkins (650-498-3056, chopkins@stanford.edu) (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

OBGYN 282: Pregnancy, Birth, and Infancy (PEDS 282)

Comprehensive clinical experience where pre-clinical medical students follow pregnant women receiving care at Stanford hospitals to attend prenatal visits, delivery, and postnatal visits. Continuity clinic format, combined with didactic lessons and discussion seminars. Students are exposed to clinical activities in a meaningful context, bolstering classroom studies in anatomy, physiology, embryology and human development, and emphasizing social, economic, and personal issues related to medicine. This program spans one quarter, covering topics related to pregnancy, labor and delivery and newborn care. Students are expected to be engaged in the clinical experiences throughout the quarter and attend the weekly 2-hour seminar. Prerequisite: pre-clinical medical student or physician assistant student. Course directors: Janelle Aby, MD and Yasser El-Sayed, MD. TAs: Jill Anderson (janders5@stanford.edu) and Jenny Tiskus (tiskus@stanford.edu).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

OBGYN 307A: Maternal-Fetal Medicine Clerkship

Selective 2. Open to visitors. Provides a focused experience in the care of ambulatory and hospitalized high-risk obstetric patients at Stanford University Medical Center. The student serves as a sub-intern with responsibility for ongoing care of assigned patients with problem pregnancies, under the supervision of the faculty of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Note: Visiting students must obtain approval through Gloria King, Residency Administrator, prior to applying for this clerkship. Please e-mail requests to gking1@stanford.edu. Interested students must send their CV, USMLE score(s), current transcript and a letter of recommendation from the Ob/Gyn Clerkship Director attesting to clinical abilities (i.e. proficient H&Ps and exam skills). These must be sent at least 4-6 weeks prior to the start of the period in which the student would like to enroll. Prereq: Gynecology 300A, C, or D. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for two weeks or four weeks (4 weeks recommended). 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: F2 Conference Room, LPCH; (OB faculty member on rounds); Time: 8:00 am. Units: 3. Call Code: 2 (optional) Director: Yasser Yehia El-Sayed, M.D. Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Jacquie Laskey (650-725-8623), HH333. (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit

OIT 344: Design for Service Innovation

Design for service innovation is an experiential course in which students work in multidisciplinary teams to design new services (including but not limited to web services) that will address the needs of an underserved population of users. Through a small number of lectures and guided exercises, but mostly in the context of specific team projects, students will learn to identify the key needs of the target population and to design services that address these needs. Our projects this year will focus on services for young adult survivors of severe childhood diseases. For the first time ever, children who have cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, major cardiac repairs, organ transplants, genetic metabolic disorders, and several forms of cancer are surviving. The first wave of these survivors is reaching young adulthood (ages 18-25). Many aspects of the young adult world are not yet user-friendly for them: applying to and then entering college, adherence to required medication and diet, more »
Design for service innovation is an experiential course in which students work in multidisciplinary teams to design new services (including but not limited to web services) that will address the needs of an underserved population of users. Through a small number of lectures and guided exercises, but mostly in the context of specific team projects, students will learn to identify the key needs of the target population and to design services that address these needs. Our projects this year will focus on services for young adult survivors of severe childhood diseases. For the first time ever, children who have cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, major cardiac repairs, organ transplants, genetic metabolic disorders, and several forms of cancer are surviving. The first wave of these survivors is reaching young adulthood (ages 18-25). Many aspects of the young adult world are not yet user-friendly for them: applying to and then entering college, adherence to required medication and diet, prospects for marriage and parenthood, participation in high school or college sports, driving, drinking, drugs, and more. Our aspiration is to develop services to improve these young adults? options for a fulfilling and satisfying life. The course is open to graduate students from all schools and departments: business (MBA1, MBA2, PhD, Sloan), Medicine (medical students, residents, fellows and postdocs), engineering (MS and PhD), humanities, sociology, psychology, education, and law. Students can find out more about this course at: http://DesignForService.stanford.edu; GSB Winter Elective BBL Jan 10th, 12 noon - 1 pm; D-School Course Exposition Feb 3rd, time TBA. Admission into the course by application only. Applications will be available at http://DesignForService.stanford.edu on Jan 13th. Applications must be submitted by Feb 4th midnight. Students will be notified about acceptance to the course by Feb 7th . Accepted students will need to reserve their slot in the course by completing an online privacy training course. Details about online training will be provide to accepted students. The training is related to the protection of our partners' privacy. Application Deadline: Noon, Feb 4th.
Last offered: Spring 2011

OIT 384: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation

In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2020), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2020), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coa more »
In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2020), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2020), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of students launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

OIT 385: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation

In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2020), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2020), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coa more »
In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2020), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2020), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of students launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ORTHO 97Q: Sport, Exercise, and Health: Exploring Sports Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Sports medicine is the practice of clinical medicine at the interface between health and performance, competition and well-being. While sports medicine had its origins in providing care to athletes, medical advances developed in care of athletes exerted a great effect on the nature and quality of care to the broader community. Topics include sports injuries, medical conditions associated with sport and exercise, ethics, coaching, women's issues, fitness and health, and sports science. Case studies.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: Writing 2

ORTHO 110: Practical Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Exam (ORTHO 210)

Designed for students considering a career in sports medicine, orthopaedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice, or physical therapy. Focus is on diagnosis and treatment of the most common injuries encountered in sports medicine, from head to toe and from acute trauma to chronic overuse. Students gain competence performing an efficient sports medicine exam, developing a differential diagnosis, and a treatment plan on how to safely return athletes back to their sport. Focused physical exam skills are taught for the neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, low back, hip, knee, leg, ankle and foot. Most sessions consist of anatomy review, case discussion, and hands-on exam practice in small groups. A few sessions cover specific hot topics in sports medicine such as concussion, athletic heart syndrome, and advanced performance techniques. Students enrolling for two units prepare an in-class presentation or short review paper.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2
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