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531 - 540 of 792 results for: Medicine

MED 290: Independent Study with Presence and the Program in Bedside Medicine

Students work with their faculty mentor on projects and studies that are broadly centered around the vision and mission of Presence: The Art and Science of Human Connection and the Program in Bedside Medicine. Please see our websites for updated projects and initiatives - Presence + Program in Bedside Medicine. Currently, we focus on: How do we teach and emphasize to students, residents, physicians (and beyond) in the medical field the need to master bedside skills? How does bedside medicine affect patient care? How has patient care changed with the omnipresence of technology in our lives? How is bedside medicine going to change in the next few decades, centuries? In investigating these questions, students utilize scientific articles and data, engage patients, and collaborate with our faculty and staff. Independent study projects culminate in a presentation to our team, with the potential for posters or manuscripts. Students paired with faculty based on their area of interest and facul more »
Students work with their faculty mentor on projects and studies that are broadly centered around the vision and mission of Presence: The Art and Science of Human Connection and the Program in Bedside Medicine. Please see our websites for updated projects and initiatives - Presence + Program in Bedside Medicine. Currently, we focus on: How do we teach and emphasize to students, residents, physicians (and beyond) in the medical field the need to master bedside skills? How does bedside medicine affect patient care? How has patient care changed with the omnipresence of technology in our lives? How is bedside medicine going to change in the next few decades, centuries? In investigating these questions, students utilize scientific articles and data, engage patients, and collaborate with our faculty and staff. Independent study projects culminate in a presentation to our team, with the potential for posters or manuscripts. Students paired with faculty based on their area of interest and faculty/project needs.We emphasize the human connection with patients, and students are encouraged to engage patients within our program for teaching sessions, research studies, among other projects. Enrollment varies with and is limited to faculty need. Repeatable for credit; more than one-quarter of commitment expected.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 16 times (up to 80 units total)

MED 291: Diagnostic Medicine on Television: Truths vs. Theatrics

School of Medicine faculty in charge of Stanford's Consultative Medicine Clinic, a real-life medical mystery clinic, will review cases from the popular TV show House and critique the show's depiction of complex disease diagnosis and treatment. We tread down the road of diagnostic dilemmas and the line between fact vs fiction.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

MED 292: Pathways in Global Health

The goal of this class is to introduce students to the diverse pathways that contribute to Global Health. From epidemiology, to climate change, everyone is impacted, and the ways we address global health problems is multifaceted. Each week, there will be different speakers from various departments such as in biology, anthropology, medicine who will talk about their careers and perspectives in global health. The class experience with be an interactive speaker series, where students will learn and develop ways they can contribute to global health.

MED 295: Advanced Cardiac Life Support

(For clinical MD students only) Prepares students to manage the victim of a cardiac arrest. Knowledge and skills necessary for resuscitation of critically ill patients. Clinical scenarios and small group discussions address cardiovascular pharmacology, arrhythmia recognition and therapy, acute coronary syndrome including myocardial infarction, ventricular dysrhythmias and defibrillation, and acute ischemic stroke. Students should get the approval of their Clerkship Coordinator before registering for the course. nRecommended prerequisites: Medicine 300A, Pediatrics 300A, or Surgery 300A. nPrerequisite: EMED 201A
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

MED 296: Being Mortal: Medicine, Mortality and Caring for Older Adults

Mortality is the inevitable, final outcome of human health. Though medical education focuses on treating illness and prolonging life, healthcare professionals in practice must face the fact that patients¿ lives cannot always be saved. This course will explore the difficult issues such as end-of-life planning, decision-making, and cost of care, that figure in hospitals, hospice, and assisted living centers. Guest speakers will include elderly care workers, medical writers and filmmakers, and physicians in geriatrics, oncology and palliative care, who will lead student discussions following their lectures. Upon finishing the course, students will learn how to better handle aging and death in their medical practice, in order to improve the quality of their patients¿ lives¿and that of their families¿ as well.

MED 297: Diabetes 101 for Healthcare Providers

Diabetes is an extremely high-prevalence disease, that you will likely encounter on a consistent basis regardless of your medical specialty, so learning about the practical aspects of treatment is extremely useful. This course is designed to teach these practical skills about diabetes care, treatment and the latest research in the field. Diabetes 101 for healthcare providers is a lunch seminar style course with lectures on subjects like: A meal in the life of a diabetic; Pumps/ CGMs/ Artificial Pancreases; Beyond Types 1 and 2; The Psychology of diabetes and chronic disease; and Rare complications and future treatments.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Basina, M. (PI)

MED 298: Being Mortal II: Approaching Serious Illness

This elective offers an opportunity for MD and PA students to improve their ability to engage in effective and compassionate conversations with patients facing serious illnesses. The course will feature palliative care physicians, oncologists, spiritual care providers, and hospice staff, and provide students with early exposure to concepts in palliative medicine, hospice care, and end-of-life care, which are otherwise given little emphasis in the core curriculum. Students will learn practical skills in serious illness conversations with patients, through case-based sessions involving peer-to-peer, peer-to-instructor, and peer-to-patient role play. Relevant topics in leadership, psychology, sociology, and professionalism will also be covered. In addition, students taking the course for 2 credits will have the opportunity to participate in on-site visits to hospices, nursing facilities, assisted-living facilities, and adult day health care facilities. For more information please contact Henry Bair (hbair@stanford.edu) or Paul Horak (pwhorak@stanford.edu).

MED 299: Directed Reading in Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Advani, R. (PI) ; Ahmed, A. (PI) ; Ahuja, N. (PI) ; Akatsu, H. (PI) ; Al-Ahmad, A. (PI) ; Alizadeh, A. (PI) ; Alsan, M. (PI) ; Andrews, J. (PI) ; Annes, J. (PI) ; Arai, S. (PI) ; Ariel, D. (PI) ; Artandi, M. (PI) ; Artandi, S. (PI) ; Asch, S. (PI) ; Ashley, E. (PI) ; Assimes, T. (PI) ; Ayoub, W. (PI) ; Banerjee, S. (PI) ; Barry, M. (PI) ; Basaviah, P. (PI) ; Basina, M. (PI) ; Basu, S. (PI) ; Behal, R. (PI) ; Bendavid, E. (PI) ; Benjamin, J. (PI) ; Berube, C. (PI) ; Bhalla, V. (PI) ; Bhatt, A. (PI) ; Bhattacharya, J. (PI) ; Blackburn, B. (PI) ; Blaschke, T. (PI) ; Blayney, D. (PI) ; Blish, C. (PI) ; Bloom, G. (PI) ; Bollyky, P. (PI) ; Bouvier, D. (PI) ; Boxer, L. (PI) ; Braddock, C. (PI) ; Brinton, T. (PI) ; Brown, W. (PI) ; Bulow, K. (PI) ; Carlson, R. (PI) ; Cartwright, C. (PI) ; Chakravarty, E. (PI) ; Chan, D. (PI) ; Chan, G. (PI) ; Chang, C. (PI) ; Chang, S. (PI) ; Chen, A. (PI) ; Chen, M. (PI) ; Cheng, X. (PI) ; Chertow, G. (PI) ; Cheung, R. (PI) ; Chi, J. (PI) ; Cho-Phan, C. (PI) ; Chu, G. (PI) ; Chua, K. (PI) ; Chung, L. (PI) ; Clarke, M. (PI) ; Clusin, W. (PI) ; Colevas, A. (PI) ; Colloff, E. (PI) ; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI) ; Cooke, J. (PI) ; Cooper, A. (PI) ; Coutre, S. (PI) ; Crapo, L. (PI) ; Crump, C. (PI) ; Cullen, M. (PI) ; Das, A. (PI) ; Dash, R. (PI) ; Daugherty, T. (PI) ; David, S. (PI) ; Dawson, L. (PI) ; Deresinski, S. (PI) ; Desai, M. (PI) ; Desai, T. (PI) ; Dhillon, G. (PI) ; Dorman, J. (PI) ; Dosiou, C. (PI) ; DuBose, A. (PI) ; Edwards, L. (PI) ; Einav, S. (PI) ; Farquhar, J. (PI) ; Fathman, C. (PI) ; Fearon, W. (PI) ; Feldman, D. (PI) ; Felsher, D. (PI) ; Fernandez-Becker, N. (PI) ; Fisher, G. (PI) ; Fitzgerald, P. (PI) ; Ford, J. (PI) ; Ford, P. (PI) ; Fowler, M. (PI) ; Frayne, S. (PI) ; Friedland, S. (PI) ; Fries, J. (PI) ; Froelicher, V. (PI) ; Gabiola, J. (PI) ; Ganjoo, K. (PI) ; Garcia, G. (PI) ; Garcia, R. (PI) ; Gardner, C. (PI) ; Gardner, P. (PI) ; Gavi, B. (PI) ; Genovese, M. (PI) ; Gerson, L. (PI) ; Gesundheit, N. (PI) ; Glaseroff, A. (PI) ; Glenn, J. (PI) ; Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI) ; Goldstein, M. (PI) ; Goodman, S. (PI) ; Goronzy, J. (PI) ; Gotlib, J. (PI) ; Gray, G. (PI) ; Green, E. (PI) ; Greenberg, H. (PI) ; Greenberg, P. (PI) ; Gregory, P. (PI) ; Habtezion, A. (PI) ; Hallenbeck, J. (PI) ; Harman, S. (PI) ; Harrington, R. (PI) ; Harshman, L. (PI) ; Haskell, W. (PI) ; Heaney, C. (PI) ; Heidenreich, P. (PI) ; Henri, H. (PI) ; Ho, D. (PI) ; Hoffman, A. (PI) ; Holman, H. (PI) ; Holodniy, M. (PI) ; Hopkins, J. (PI) ; Horning, S. (PI) ; Hsia, H. (PI) ; Hunt, S. (PI) ; Ioannidis, J. (PI) ; Isom, R. (PI) ; Jagannathan, P. (PI) ; Jernick, J. (PI) ; Ji, H. (PI) ; Johnston, L. (PI) ; Jones, E. (PI) ; Kahn, J. (PI) ; Kao, P. (PI) ; Kastelein, M. (PI) ; Katz, R. (PI) ; Katzenstein, D. (PI) ; Kenny, K. (PI) ; Khatri, P. (PI) ; Khazeni, N. (PI) ; Khemani, S. (PI) ; Khush, K. (PI) ; Killen, J. (PI) ; Kim, S. (PI) ; Knowles, J. (PI) ; Kohrt, H. (PI) ; Kraemer, F. (PI) ; Krishnan, E. (PI) ; Kumar, S. (PI) ; Kummar, S. (PI) ; Kunz, P. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; Kurian, A. (PI) ; Kuschner, W. (PI) ; Ladabaum, U. (PI) ; Lafayette, R. (PI) ; Laport, G. (PI) ; Lee, D. (PI) ; Lee, J. (PI) ; Lee, P. (PI) ; Leung, L. (PI) ; Levin, E. (PI) ; Levitt, J. (PI) ; Levitt, L. (PI) ; Levy, R. (PI) ; Levy, S. (PI) ; Liang, D. (PI) ; Liedtke, M. (PI) ; Lin, S. (PI) ; Lindsay, A. (PI) ; Lorig, K. (PI) ; Lowe, A. (PI) ; Lowsky, R. (PI) ; Luby, S. (PI) ; Lutchman, G. (PI) ; Majeti, R. (PI) ; McConnell, M. (PI) ; McLaughlin, T. (PI) ; Medeiros, B. (PI) ; Meyer, T. (PI) ; Miklos, D. (PI) ; Miller, G. (PI) ; Milstein, A. (PI) ; Mitchell, B. (PI) ; Mohabir, P. (PI) ; Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI) ; Musen, M. (PI) ; Nadeau, K. (PI) ; Narayan, S. (PI) ; Neal, J. (PI) ; Negrin, R. (PI) ; Nevins, A. (PI) ; Nguyen, L. (PI) ; Nguyen, M. (PI) ; Nguyen, P. (PI) ; Nicolls, M. (PI) ; O' Callahan, P. (PI) ; Osterberg, L. (PI) ; Owens, D. (PI) ; Pao, A. (PI) ; Parikh, R. (PI) ; Parnes, J. (PI) ; Parsonnet, J. (PI) ; Pasricha, P. (PI) ; Pegram, M. (PI) ; Periyakoil, V. (PI) ; Petersen, J. (PI) ; Pinto, H. (PI) ; Pompei, P. (PI) ; Popp, R. (PI) ; Posley, K. (PI) ; Price, E. (PI) ; Prochaska, J. (PI) ; Puri, R. (PI) ; Quertermous, T. (PI) ; Raffin, T. (PI) ; Reejhsinghani, R. (PI) ; Rehkopf, D. (PI) ; Relman, D. (PI) ; Rizk, N. (PI) ; Robinson, B. (PI) ; Rockson, S. (PI) ; Rodriguez, F. (PI) ; Rohatgi, R. (PI) ; Rosas, L. (PI) ; Rosen, G. (PI) ; Rosenberg, S. (PI) ; Rudd, P. (PI) ; Ruoss, S. (PI) ; Rydel, T. (PI) ; Scandling, J. (PI) ; Schillinger, E. (PI) ; Schnittger, I. (PI) ; Schoolnik, G. (PI) ; Schroeder, J. (PI) ; Shafer, R. (PI) ; Shah, N. (PI) ; Shah, S. (PI) ; Sharp, C. (PI) ; Shen, K. (PI) ; Shieh, L. (PI) ; Shizuru, J. (PI) ; Shoor, S. (PI) ; Sikic, B. (PI) ; Sindher, S. (PI) ; Singer, S. (PI) ; Singh, B. (PI) ; Singh, U. (PI) ; Skeff, K. (PI) ; Sledge, G. (PI) ; Smith-Coggins, R. (PI) ; Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI) ; Srinivas, S. (PI) ; Stafford, R. (PI) ; Stefanick, M. (PI) ; Stertzer, S. (PI) ; Stevens, D. (PI) ; Stockdale, F. (PI) ; Strober, S. (PI) ; Studdert, D. (PI) ; Tai, J. (PI) ; Tamura, M. (PI) ; Tan, J. (PI) ; Telli, M. (PI) ; Tepper, R. (PI) ; Tompkins, L. (PI) ; Tremmel, J. (PI) ; Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI) ; Tsao, P. (PI) ; Upadhyay, D. (PI) ; Utz, P. (PI) ; Vagelos, R. (PI) ; Valantine, H. (PI) ; Verghese, A. (PI) ; Wakelee, H. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warvariv, V. (PI) ; Weill, D. (PI) ; Weinacker, A. (PI) ; Weng, K. (PI) ; Weng, W. (PI) ; Weyand, C. (PI) ; Wheeler, M. (PI) ; Wiedmann, T. (PI) ; Winkelmayer, W. (PI) ; Winkleby, M. (PI) ; Winslow, D. (PI) ; Winter, T. (PI) ; Witteles, R. (PI) ; Wu, J. (PI) ; Wu, J. (PI) ; Wu, S. (PI) ; Yabu, J. (PI) ; Yang, P. (PI) ; Yeung, A. (PI) ; Yock, P. (PI) ; Zamanian, R. (PI) ; Zehnder, J. (PI) ; Zei, P. (PI) ; Zolopa, A. (PI) ; Zulman, D. (PI) ; de Jesus Perez, V. (PI) ; Mendoza, F. (SI) ; Jezmir, J. (TA)

MED 300A: Internal Medicine Core Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Required. DESCRIPTION: Teaches the natural history, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of medical illness. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the understanding, skills, and attitudes desirable in a scientific and compassionate physician. Students record histories, physical examinations, and laboratory data for patients for whom they are responsible and present their findings, together with their diagnoses and treatment plans, at rounds and conferences. Developing sound clinical reasoning skills is continuously emphasized. An essential aspect of the clerkship is the students' gradual assumption of direct responsibility for, and full-time involvement in, patient care with the house staff and faculty team. To take advantage of the differences in patient populations and teaching staffs of the four hospitals, students spend three weeks at either SUMC or PAVAMC, and three weeks at either SCVMC in San Jose or KPMC in Santa Clara. The resulting six week experience is an integrated curriculum designed to cover the essentials of internal medicine. The Department of Medicine supervises a random draw-based assignment to two of the four locations shortly before the beginning of each odd-numbered clerkship period. A passing grade will require both a satisfactory performance at both clinical sites and passing the NBME Subject Exam at the end of 6 weeks. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full time for 8 weeks, 18 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: John Kugler, M.D., jkugler@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Nancy D'Amico, 650-721-1640. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Varies, students will be notified prior to the first day; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 4. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC, KPMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 10 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 20 units total)

MED 302A: Infectious Diseases Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The infectious diseases clerkship features an active inpatient service at Stanford Hospital, which averages two to four new consults per day. As a consulting specialty service within the Department of Medicine, participants are able to see a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical and diagnostic reasoning, as well as in developing a good working knowledge of antimicrobial agents and a rational approach for their use. The training and teaching opportunities are rich because of the case mix (medical, surgical, ICU) and broad patient populations that are seen at Stanford Hospital. The service is supervised on a daily basis by the infectious diseases fellow, who will work closely with students rotating on the clinical service. Students attend daily patient rounds, weekly infectious diseases conferences, and may attend other research or patient-care conferenc more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The infectious diseases clerkship features an active inpatient service at Stanford Hospital, which averages two to four new consults per day. As a consulting specialty service within the Department of Medicine, participants are able to see a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical and diagnostic reasoning, as well as in developing a good working knowledge of antimicrobial agents and a rational approach for their use. The training and teaching opportunities are rich because of the case mix (medical, surgical, ICU) and broad patient populations that are seen at Stanford Hospital. The service is supervised on a daily basis by the infectious diseases fellow, who will work closely with students rotating on the clinical service. Students attend daily patient rounds, weekly infectious diseases conferences, and may attend other research or patient-care conferences at Stanford. The infectious diseases fellows' team room, L-134, is located in the Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine home office on the first floor of the Lane building. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full time for 4 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Andrew Nevins, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Brenda Norrie, 650-725-8338. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: On the first day of the rotation, page the Stanford general infectious diseases fellow through the Stanford page operator at 650-723-6661; Time: 8:00 AM. CALL CODE: 1. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5
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