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531 - 540 of 772 results for: Medicine

MED 291: Diagnostic Medicine on Television: Truths vs. Theatrics

School of Medicine faculty in charge of Stanford's Consultative Medicine Clinic, a real-life medical mystery clinic, will review cases from the popular TV show House and critique the show's depiction of complex disease diagnosis and treatment. We tread down the road of diagnostic dilemmas and the line between fact vs fiction. Lunch will be provided.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

MED 295: Advanced Cardiac Life Support

(For clinical MD students only) Prepares students to manage the victim of a cardiac arrest. Knowledge and skills necessary for resuscitation of critically ill patients. Clinical scenarios and small group discussions address cardiovascular pharmacology, arrhythmia recognition and therapy, acute coronary syndrome including myocardial infarction, ventricular dysrhythmias and defibrillation, and acute ischemic stroke. Students should get the approval of their Clerkship Coordinator before registering for the course. nRecommended prerequisites: Medicine 300A, Pediatrics 300A, or Surgery 300A. nPrerequisite: EMED 201A
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

MED 299: Directed Reading in Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Advani, R. (PI) ; Ahmed, A. (PI) ; Ahuja, N. (PI) ; Akatsu, H. (PI) ; Al-Ahmad, A. (PI) ; Alizadeh, A. (PI) ; Alsan, M. (PI) ; Andrews, J. (PI) ; Annes, J. (PI) ; Arai, S. (PI) ; Artandi, M. (PI) ; Artandi, S. (PI) ; Asch, S. (PI) ; Ashley, E. (PI) ; Assimes, T. (PI) ; Ayoub, W. (PI) ; Banerjee, S. (PI) ; Barry, M. (PI) ; Basaviah, P. (PI) ; Basina, M. (PI) ; Basu, S. (PI) ; Behal, R. (PI) ; Bendavid, E. (PI) ; Benjamin, J. (PI) ; Berube, C. (PI) ; Bhalla, V. (PI) ; Bhatt, A. (PI) ; Bhattacharya, J. (PI) ; Blackburn, B. (PI) ; Blaschke, T. (PI) ; Blayney, D. (PI) ; Blish, C. (PI) ; Bloom, G. (PI) ; Bollyky, P. (PI) ; Bouvier, D. (PI) ; Boxer, L. (PI) ; Braddock, C. (PI) ; Brinton, T. (PI) ; Brown, W. (PI) ; Bulow, K. (PI) ; Carlson, R. (PI) ; Cartwright, C. (PI) ; Chakravarty, E. (PI) ; Chan, D. (PI) ; Chan, G. (PI) ; Chang, C. (PI) ; Chang, S. (PI) ; Chen, A. (PI) ; Chertow, G. (PI) ; Cheung, R. (PI) ; Chi, J. (PI) ; Cho-Phan, C. (PI) ; Chu, G. (PI) ; Chua, K. (PI) ; Chung, L. (PI) ; Clarke, M. (PI) ; Clusin, W. (PI) ; Colevas, A. (PI) ; Colloff, E. (PI) ; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI) ; Cooke, J. (PI) ; Cooper, A. (PI) ; Coutre, S. (PI) ; Crapo, L. (PI) ; Crump, C. (PI) ; Cullen, M. (PI) ; Das, A. (PI) ; Dash, R. (PI) ; Daugherty, T. (PI) ; David, S. (PI) ; Dawson, L. (PI) ; Deresinski, S. (PI) ; Desai, M. (PI) ; Desai, T. (PI) ; Dhillon, G. (PI) ; Dorman, J. (PI) ; Dosiou, C. (PI) ; DuBose, A. (PI) ; Edwards, L. (PI) ; Einav, S. (PI) ; Farquhar, J. (PI) ; Fathman, C. (PI) ; Fearon, W. (PI) ; Feldman, D. (PI) ; Felsher, D. (PI) ; Fisher, G. (PI) ; Fitzgerald, P. (PI) ; Ford, J. (PI) ; Ford, P. (PI) ; Fowler, M. (PI) ; Frayne, S. (PI) ; Friedland, S. (PI) ; Fries, J. (PI) ; Froelicher, V. (PI) ; Gabiola, J. (PI) ; Ganjoo, K. (PI) ; Garcia, G. (PI) ; Garcia, R. (PI) ; Gardner, C. (PI) ; Gardner, P. (PI) ; Gavi, B. (PI) ; Genovese, M. (PI) ; Gerson, L. (PI) ; Gesundheit, N. (PI) ; Giacomini, J. (PI) ; Glaseroff, A. (PI) ; Glenn, J. (PI) ; Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI) ; Goldstein, M. (PI) ; Goodman, S. (PI) ; Goronzy, J. (PI) ; Gotlib, J. (PI) ; Gray, G. (PI) ; Greenberg, H. (PI) ; Greenberg, P. (PI) ; Gregory, P. (PI) ; Habtezion, A. (PI) ; Hallenbeck, J. (PI) ; Harman, S. (PI) ; Harrington, R. (PI) ; Harshman, L. (PI) ; Haskell, W. (PI) ; Heaney, C. (PI) ; Heidenreich, P. (PI) ; Henri, H. (PI) ; Ho, D. (PI) ; Hoffman, A. (PI) ; Holman, H. (PI) ; Holodniy, M. (PI) ; Hopkins, J. (PI) ; Horning, S. (PI) ; Hsia, H. (PI) ; Hunt, S. (PI) ; Ioannidis, J. (PI) ; Isom, R. (PI) ; Jagannathan, P. (PI) ; Jernick, J. (PI) ; Ji, H. (PI) ; Johnston, L. (PI) ; Jones, E. (PI) ; Kahn, J. (PI) ; Kao, P. (PI) ; Kastelein, M. (PI) ; Katz, R. (PI) ; Katzenstein, D. (PI) ; Kenny, K. (PI) ; Khatri, P. (PI) ; Khazeni, N. (PI) ; Khush, K. (PI) ; Killen, J. (PI) ; Kim, S. (PI) ; Kohrt, H. (PI) ; Kraemer, F. (PI) ; Krishnan, E. (PI) ; Kummar, S. (PI) ; Kunz, P. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; Kurian, A. (PI) ; Kuschner, W. (PI) ; Ladabaum, U. (PI) ; Lafayette, R. (PI) ; Laport, G. (PI) ; Lee, D. (PI) ; Lee, J. (PI) ; Lee, P. (PI) ; Leung, L. (PI) ; Levin, E. (PI) ; Levitt, J. (PI) ; Levitt, L. (PI) ; Levy, R. (PI) ; Levy, S. (PI) ; Liang, D. (PI) ; Liedtke, M. (PI) ; Lin, S. (PI) ; Lindsay, A. (PI) ; Lorig, K. (PI) ; Lowe, A. (PI) ; Lowsky, R. (PI) ; Luby, S. (PI) ; Lutchman, G. (PI) ; Majeti, R. (PI) ; McConnell, M. (PI) ; McLaughlin, T. (PI) ; Medeiros, B. (PI) ; Meyer, T. (PI) ; Miklos, D. (PI) ; Miller, G. (PI) ; Milstein, A. (PI) ; Mitchell, B. (PI) ; Mohabir, P. (PI) ; Montoya, J. (PI) ; Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI) ; Musen, M. (PI) ; Narayan, S. (PI) ; Neal, J. (PI) ; Negrin, R. (PI) ; Nevins, A. (PI) ; Nguyen, L. (PI) ; Nguyen, M. (PI) ; Nguyen, P. (PI) ; Nicolls, M. (PI) ; O' Callahan, P. (PI) ; Osterberg, L. (PI) ; Owens, D. (PI) ; Pao, A. (PI) ; Parnes, J. (PI) ; Parsonnet, J. (PI) ; Pasricha, P. (PI) ; Pegram, M. (PI) ; Periyakoil, V. (PI) ; Petersen, J. (PI) ; Pinto, H. (PI) ; Pompei, P. (PI) ; Popp, R. (PI) ; Posley, K. (PI) ; Price, E. (PI) ; Prochaska, J. (PI) ; Puri, R. (PI) ; Quertermous, T. (PI) ; Raffin, T. (PI) ; Rehkopf, D. (PI) ; Relman, D. (PI) ; Rizk, N. (PI) ; Robinson, B. (PI) ; Rockson, S. (PI) ; Rodriguez, F. (PI) ; Rohatgi, R. (PI) ; Rosas, L. (PI) ; Rosen, G. (PI) ; Rosenberg, S. (PI) ; Rudd, P. (PI) ; Ruoss, S. (PI) ; Rydel, T. (PI) ; Scandling, J. (PI) ; Schillinger, E. (PI) ; Schnittger, I. (PI) ; Schoolnik, G. (PI) ; Schroeder, J. (PI) ; Shafer, R. (PI) ; Shah, N. (PI) ; Shah, S. (PI) ; Sharp, C. (PI) ; Shen, K. (PI) ; Shieh, L. (PI) ; Shizuru, J. (PI) ; Shoor, S. (PI) ; Sikic, B. (PI) ; Singer, S. (PI) ; Singh, B. (PI) ; Singh, U. (PI) ; Skeff, K. (PI) ; Smith-Coggins, R. (PI) ; Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI) ; Srinivas, S. (PI) ; Stafford, R. (PI) ; Stefanick, M. (PI) ; Stertzer, S. (PI) ; Stevens, D. (PI) ; Stockdale, F. (PI) ; Strober, S. (PI) ; Studdert, D. (PI) ; Tai, J. (PI) ; Tamura, M. (PI) ; Tan, J. (PI) ; Telli, M. (PI) ; Tepper, R. (PI) ; Tompkins, L. (PI) ; Tremmel, J. (PI) ; Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI) ; Tsao, P. (PI) ; Upadhyay, D. (PI) ; Utz, P. (PI) ; Vagelos, R. (PI) ; Valantine, H. (PI) ; Verghese, A. (PI) ; Wakelee, H. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warvariv, V. (PI) ; Weill, D. (PI) ; Weinacker, A. (PI) ; Weng, K. (PI) ; Weng, W. (PI) ; Weyand, C. (PI) ; Wiedmann, T. (PI) ; Winkelmayer, W. (PI) ; Winkleby, M. (PI) ; Winslow, D. (PI) ; Winter, T. (PI) ; Witteles, R. (PI) ; Wu, J. (PI) ; Wu, J. (PI) ; Wu, S. (PI) ; Yabu, J. (PI) ; Yang, P. (PI) ; Yeung, A. (PI) ; Yock, P. (PI) ; Zamanian, R. (PI) ; Zehnder, J. (PI) ; Zei, P. (PI) ; Zolopa, A. (PI) ; Zulman, D. (PI) ; de Jesus Perez, V. (PI) ; Mendoza, F. (SI) ; Jezmir, J. (TA)

MED 300A: Internal Medicine Core Clerkship

Closed to visitors. Teaches the natural history, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of medical illness. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the understanding, skills, and attitudes desirable in a scientific and compassionate physician. Students record histories, physical examinations, and laboratory data for patients for whom they are responsible and present their findings, together with their diagnoses and treatment plans, at rounds and conferences. Developing sound clinical reasoning skills is continuously emphasized. An essential aspect of the clerkship is the students¿ gradual assumption of direct responsibility for, and full-time involvement in, patient care with the house staff and faculty team. To take advantage of the differences in patient populations and teaching staffs of the four hospitals, students spend four weeks at either SUMC or PAVAMC, and four weeks at either SCVMC in San Jose or KPMC in Santa Clara. The resulting eight week experience is an integrated curriculum designed to cover the essentials of internal medicine. The Department of Medicine supervises a random draw-based assignment to two of the four locations shortly before the beginning of each odd-numbered clerkship period. A passing grade will require both a satisfactory performance at both clinical sites and passing the NBME Subject Exam at the end of 8 weeks. Prereq: MED 208 or INDE 206. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for eight weeks. 18 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Varies depending on site assignment. Students will be notified prior to the first day. Units: 12. Call Code: 4. Director: John Kugler, M.D. (jkugler@stanford.edu). Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Nancy D¿Amico (650-721-1640), 1215 Welch Road, Mod B, Space #37, MC 5418. (SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC, KPMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit

MED 302A: Infectious Diseases Clerkship

Open to visitors. The infectious diseases clerkship features an active inpatient service at Stanford Hospital, which averages two to four new consults per day. As a consulting specialty service within the Department of Medicine, participants are able to see a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical and diagnostic reasoning, as well as in developing a good working knowledge of antimicrobial agents and a rational approach for their use. The training and teaching opportunities are rich because of the case mix (medical, surgical, ICU) and broad patient populations that are seen at Stanford Hospital. The service is supervised on a daily basis by the infectious diseases fellow, who will work closely with students rotating on the clinical service. Students attend daily patient rounds, weekly infectious diseases conferences, and may attend other research or patient-care conferences at Stanford. Two-week rotations are possible, but more »
Open to visitors. The infectious diseases clerkship features an active inpatient service at Stanford Hospital, which averages two to four new consults per day. As a consulting specialty service within the Department of Medicine, participants are able to see a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical and diagnostic reasoning, as well as in developing a good working knowledge of antimicrobial agents and a rational approach for their use. The training and teaching opportunities are rich because of the case mix (medical, surgical, ICU) and broad patient populations that are seen at Stanford Hospital. The service is supervised on a daily basis by the infectious diseases fellow, who will work closely with students rotating on the clinical service. Students attend daily patient rounds, weekly infectious diseases conferences, and may attend other research or patient-care conferences at Stanford. Two-week rotations are possible, but four weeks is preferred. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full time for four weeks. A two-week rotation is also permissible. Maximum two students per period. Reporting Instructions: On the first day of the rotation, page the Stanford general infectious diseases fellow through the Stanford page operator: (650) 723-6661 at 8:00 am. The infectious diseases fellows¿ team room, L-134, is located in the Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine home office on the first floor of the Lane building. Units: 6. Call Code: 1. Director: Andrew Nevins, M.D. Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Brenda Norrie (650-725-8338). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

MED 302B: Infectious Diseases Clerkship

Open to visitors. The infectious diseases clerkship features an active inpatient service at the Palo Alto VA, which averages one to three new consults per day. As a consulting specialty service within the Department of Medicine, participants are able to see a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical and diagnostic reasoning, as well as in developing a good working knowledge of antimicrobial agents and a rational approach for their use. The training and teaching opportunities are rich because of the case mix (medical, surgical, ICU) and patient populations that are seen at the Palo Alto VA. The service is supervised on a daily basis by the infectious diseases fellow, who will work closely with students rotating on the clinical service. Students attend daily patient rounds, weekly infectious diseases conferences, and may attend other research or patient-care conferences at the VA and/or Stanford. Two-week rotations are possib more »
Open to visitors. The infectious diseases clerkship features an active inpatient service at the Palo Alto VA, which averages one to three new consults per day. As a consulting specialty service within the Department of Medicine, participants are able to see a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical and diagnostic reasoning, as well as in developing a good working knowledge of antimicrobial agents and a rational approach for their use. The training and teaching opportunities are rich because of the case mix (medical, surgical, ICU) and patient populations that are seen at the Palo Alto VA. The service is supervised on a daily basis by the infectious diseases fellow, who will work closely with students rotating on the clinical service. Students attend daily patient rounds, weekly infectious diseases conferences, and may attend other research or patient-care conferences at the VA and/or Stanford. Two-week rotations are possible, but four weeks is preferred. Course objectives and resources are provided at the beginning of the rotation. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: On the first day of the rotation, page the Palo Alto VA infectious diseases fellow through the Stanford page operator: (650) 723-6661 at 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 1.Director: David Relman, M.D. Other Faculty: A. Chary, M. Holodniy, J. Parsonnet, C. Renault, U. Singh, D. Winslow. Coord: Marian Askew (650-493-5000 x64209, marian.askew@va.gov.) (PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

MED 302C: Infectious Diseases Clerkship

Open to visitors. Teaches the skills of diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases, including acute illnesses seen in the economically disadvantaged, and subspecialty patient referrals. The format of the clerkship at SCVMC is the same as at SUMC and PAVAMC, but the patient population at SCVMC differs from that of the other two hospitals. Two infectious diseases teaching conferences are held weekly for all three hospital services, and there are two additional conferences per month at SCVMC. Consultations are provided to all general (medical, ob-gyn, surgical) and specialized (burn, rehabilitation, dialysis) units. Tuberculosis clinic and HIV clinic experiences are also available during the rotation. The director of the diagnostic microbiology laboratory will instruct students on diagnostic microbiology lab use and interpretation of results. The Infection Prevention nurses provide an orientation to hospital epidemiology. Students will be supervised by an attending, fellow and one to more »
Open to visitors. Teaches the skills of diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases, including acute illnesses seen in the economically disadvantaged, and subspecialty patient referrals. The format of the clerkship at SCVMC is the same as at SUMC and PAVAMC, but the patient population at SCVMC differs from that of the other two hospitals. Two infectious diseases teaching conferences are held weekly for all three hospital services, and there are two additional conferences per month at SCVMC. Consultations are provided to all general (medical, ob-gyn, surgical) and specialized (burn, rehabilitation, dialysis) units. Tuberculosis clinic and HIV clinic experiences are also available during the rotation. The director of the diagnostic microbiology laboratory will instruct students on diagnostic microbiology lab use and interpretation of results. The Infection Prevention nurses provide an orientation to hospital epidemiology. Students will be supervised by an attending, fellow and one to two residents. Students wishing to do this clerkship must get approval from Dr. Supriya Narasimhan first before registering. nPrereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: SCVMC, Room 6C095, 6th floor, Old Main Hospital, SCVMC; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 1. Director: Supriya Narasimhan, M.D., (408-885-5304). Other Faculty: J. Gupta, J. Kim, S. Narasimhan, A. Polesky, M. Ray, H. Sahni, J. Szumowski. Coord: Melanie Bozarth (408-885-5395; melanie.bozarth@hhs.sccgov.org). (SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

MED 303A: Cardiology Clerkship - Inpatient/Outpatient Consult

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Emphasizes the acquisition of diagnostic skills related to cardiovascular evaluation. This experience is derived through active participation in the inpatient consultative cardiology program, which is directed by Dr. Stanley Rockson. In addition, at least three half days per week are spent in the outpatient setting, which encompasses aspects of preventive cardiology as well. Direct patient experiences are supplemented with one-on-one didactic sessions and directed reading. The elective also emphasizes the acquisition of ECG reading skills via electrocardiographic reading sessions. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 4-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Dr. Rockson, CVRC CV-267; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Stanley Rockson, M.D. (650-725-7571). Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Stanley Rockson, M.D. (650-725-7571). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

MED 303B: Cardiology Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Exposes the students to all areas of clinical cardiology. Students participate in four half-day ambulatory care cardiology clinics, perform at least 3-5 new consultations per week, with each consultation being presented to an attending physician and having a consultation note written. Additionally, each student ¿rounds¿ five days a week on patients on the consultation service. Students read electrocardiograms almost daily. Their physical examinations are reviewed by the attending physician and/or cardiology fellow. They are exposed to all areas of clinical cardiologic testing: exercise treadmill/stress testing, radionuclide testing (thallium scans and radionuclide ejection fractions), cardiac ultrasound studies, cardiac catheterization and percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention (PTCI). Students follow each of their patients through these tests. When surgery is required, they observe the procedure in the operating room. Students participate in dai more »
Selective 1. Open to visitors. Exposes the students to all areas of clinical cardiology. Students participate in four half-day ambulatory care cardiology clinics, perform at least 3-5 new consultations per week, with each consultation being presented to an attending physician and having a consultation note written. Additionally, each student ¿rounds¿ five days a week on patients on the consultation service. Students read electrocardiograms almost daily. Their physical examinations are reviewed by the attending physician and/or cardiology fellow. They are exposed to all areas of clinical cardiologic testing: exercise treadmill/stress testing, radionuclide testing (thallium scans and radionuclide ejection fractions), cardiac ultrasound studies, cardiac catheterization and percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention (PTCI). Students follow each of their patients through these tests. When surgery is required, they observe the procedure in the operating room. Students participate in daily didactic sessions covering all areas of basic cardiology and are present at daily coronary care unit/medical intensive care unit rounds. Each student also has the opportunity to participate in any other ongoing medical or surgical teaching conferences as time permits. Prereq: None. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 5 students per period. (Upon request, 2 students may be added). Reporting Instructions: Where: PAVAMC, Second Floor, Rm E2-426; Time: 7:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: John Giacomini, M.D. nOther Faculty: V. Froelicher, P. Heidenreich, P. Milner, M. Hlatky, W. Fearon, K. Friday. Coord: Donna Harris (650-858-3932), PAVAMC (111C). (PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit

MED 303C: Cardiology Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Students are part of a cardiology team that consults on hospitalized patients, sees outpatients in seven half day sessions weekly, and attends didactic conferences including noon conferences, weekly Medicine grand-round as well as Cardiology Cath conferences. Opportunities are available to be involved in the various procedures performed by the department: stress test, echocardiogram, cardiac catheterization and implantable devices. We also encourage their participation with our Cardiovascular Surgeons for a complete cardiology experience. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks by arrangement only. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Valley Specialty Center, 3rd Floor, Suite 340; Time: 9:00 a.m. Units: 6. Call Code: 0.Director: Susan Zhao, MD, FACC, Associate Chief, Division of Cardiology, SCVMC. Other Faculty: M. Aggarwal, H. Brewster, A. Deluna, H. Shiran, C. Smith, A. Swaminathan, E. Yu, S. Zhao. Coord: Sherry Hamamjy (408-885-4389, sherry.hamamjy@hhs.sccgov.org), Med Admin. (SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6
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