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521 - 530 of 771 results for: Medicine

MED 281: How to Change the World (for the Better)

This unique course will enable students to learn from invited guests about how to "Change the World". As a group, Humankind has had a lasting impact on this planet but, on an individual basis, our impact can seem limited. Many innovators from the sciences, humanities, engineering and business are making this world a better place on a large scale. How do they do this? Through a series of fireside interviews with "World Changing" guest speakers from non-profits, business and government, we will explore how individuals can have a huge, positive influence on the state of the world. Students will be asked to formulate a short 5 slide presentation about their thoughts on the interviews or their plan to change the world. Previous speakers included: co-founder of Patreon, business editor of the New York Times, executive from Nike, and head of Bangladesh USAID program. Students can take ideas developed in the course to apply for the $40,000 Westly Prize in Social Innovation (under age 28). Dinner will be provided for enrolled students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

MED 282: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 182)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 283: Interpersonal Communication in Health Care (PSYC 283)

Communication is an unavoidable element of our everyday life that often goes unexamined. In this course, we will first examine the communication experiences in daily life with friends, family, significant others, peers, and coworkers. You will then engage with a variety of materials designed to enhance both your analytic and experiential knowledge about our everyday communication and how this relates to communication in health care. Analytic knowledge stems from your understanding of theoretical and written materials and others¿ experiences. Experiential knowledge will require you to apply what you have learned to your own communication experiences. In addition to mastering course concepts through readings, class discussions, and lectures, time in class will be devoted to applying these concepts through various activities.

MED 284: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics I (MED 184)

Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including topics such as conflict resolution, team dynamic. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Repeatable for credit

MED 286: Health Information Technology and Strategy

Health Information technology was intended to help reduce and cost and improve the quality of health care services. TO date, this is little evidence that this goal has been achieved. This course is designed to explore economic frameworks that can help us to understand how health IT can achieve it's intended goals. These frameworks build from general business and economic models used successfully in other industries. The course will be utilize both business cases and lecture to prepare students to propose potential novel applications of health information technology solutions. Each student will have a team-based final project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Schulman, K. (PI)

MED 287: Survey of Asian Health Issues (ASNAMST 287)

In this lecture series, students will explore Asian health topics. Specifically, the chronic disease risk and burden of Asians in the U.S. as a group is considered. Additionally, the necessity of the practice of disaggregation in the study and treatment of Asian Americans is emphasized. Topics will include cardiovascular disease, cancer, population health, precision health, pharmacogenomics and longevity in Asian-Americans. Class format is 30 minute lecture followed by 20 minutes for questions. No required readings. Opportunity to connect with guest speakers for research opportunities. Assignments will include short written reflections on lecture topics. This course is relevant for students interested in basic biology research, epidemiology, and public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work. Grading is satisfactory/no credit. All students are welcome, limit 25.
Last offered: Spring 2019

MED 289: Introduction to Bioengineering Research (BIOE 390)

Preference to medical and bioengineering graduate students with first preference given to Bioengineering Scholarly Concentration medical students. Bioengineering is an interdisciplinary field that leverages the disciplines of biology, medicine, and engineering to understand living systems, and engineer biological systems and improve engineering designs and human and environmental health. Students and faculty make presentations during the course. Students expected to make presentations, complete a short paper, read selected articles, and take quizzes on the material.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 290: Independent Study with Presence and the Program in Bedside Medicine

Students work with their faculty mentor on projects and studies that are broadly centered around the vision and mission of Presence: The Art and Science of Human Connection and the Program in Bedside Medicine. Please see our websites for updated projects and initiatives - Presence + Program in Bedside Medicine. Currently, we focus on: How do we teach and emphasize to students, residents, physicians (and beyond) in the medical field the need to master bedside skills? How does bedside medicine affect patient care? How has patient care changed with the omnipresence of technology in our lives? How is bedside medicine going to change in the next few decades, centuries? In investigating these questions, students utilize scientific articles and data, engage patients, and collaborate with our faculty and staff. Independent study projects culminate in a presentation to our team, with the potential for posters or manuscripts. Students paired with faculty based on their area of interest and facul more »
Students work with their faculty mentor on projects and studies that are broadly centered around the vision and mission of Presence: The Art and Science of Human Connection and the Program in Bedside Medicine. Please see our websites for updated projects and initiatives - Presence + Program in Bedside Medicine. Currently, we focus on: How do we teach and emphasize to students, residents, physicians (and beyond) in the medical field the need to master bedside skills? How does bedside medicine affect patient care? How has patient care changed with the omnipresence of technology in our lives? How is bedside medicine going to change in the next few decades, centuries? In investigating these questions, students utilize scientific articles and data, engage patients, and collaborate with our faculty and staff. Independent study projects culminate in a presentation to our team, with the potential for posters or manuscripts. Students paired with faculty based on their area of interest and faculty/project needs.We emphasize the human connection with patients, and students are encouraged to engage patients within our program for teaching sessions, research studies, among other projects. Enrollment varies with and is limited to faculty need. Repeatable for credit; more than one-quarter of commitment expected.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

MED 291: Diagnostic Medicine on Television: Truths vs. Theatrics

School of Medicine faculty in charge of Stanford's Consultative Medicine Clinic, a real-life medical mystery clinic, will review cases from the popular TV show House and critique the show's depiction of complex disease diagnosis and treatment. We tread down the road of diagnostic dilemmas and the line between fact vs fiction. Lunch will be provided.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
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