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471 - 480 of 793 results for: Medicine

MED 215C: Health Policy Graduate Student Tutorial III (HRP 201C)

Third in a three-quarter seminar series, the core tutorial is for first-year Health Policy PhD students and all MS Health Policy students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2

MED 216: Clinical Integration

The practice of clinical medicine requires the integration of several fields of knowledge including Embryology, Anatomy, Physiology, Pathology, Pharmacology, and Microbiology. In this exciting course, we will systematically review subjects such as Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Nephrology, Pulmonology, Endocrinology, Neurology, and Hematology/Oncology. I will provide power points and an outline as a reference point for the content. The majority of the classroom time will be spend with guided review of an excellent question bank. This will serve as an excellent review of the subjects after they have been formally taught during the M2 year. I have almost a decade of experience guiding students through the USMLE Step 1 exam with significant success. Utilizing my experience, I hope to help ¿connect the dots¿ in the above fields and prepare the student to think about ¿pathophysiology¿ as a guide to clinical reasoning.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 1 units total)

MED 219: What Keeps Us Up at Night

This lunchtime seminar series will bring Patients and Families, Clinicians and Administrative Leadership together in the classroom to discuss real world healthcare issues that directly affect all of us, but especially patients. n nIn-class discussion will focus around topics that are immediately relevant to Patients, Clinicians, and to our hospital and clinic leadership. Participants will engage in conversation, drive forward meaningful discussion, and generate innovative ideas for solutions.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

MED 221: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 121)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

MED 223: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Sciences Seminar

Weekly seminar series featuring cardiovascular research by faculty. This course is intended for medical students, graduate students, and advanced undergraduate students. On Tuesdays, students attend Frontiers in Cardiovascualr Science. On Thursdays, a faculty member will present to students their research, followed by Q&A session with the students.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 224: Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Human & Planetary Health (HRP 224, PUBLPOL 224)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health is a Collaboratory workshop for students/fellows to design and develop innovative social ventures addressing key challenges in health and the environment, especially in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030). Your mandate in identifying problems and designing solutions is broad and flexible! SE Lab is open to students and fellows across Stanford and combines design thinking exercises, short lectures & case studies, workshops, small group teamwork, presentations, guest speakers, and faculty, practitioner and peer feedback to support you and your team in generating and developing ideas and projects that will change the world! Join SE Lab with an idea or simply the desire to join a team. Enrollment limited to 30.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: Bloom, G. (PI)

MED 225: Drug Development: From a Concept to the Clinic

This course is designed for medical students, trainees, basic scientists, clinicians and clinician-scientists at Stanford to provide an educational and practical perspective on the essential issues in drug development. Using a blend of seminars and dynamic workshops, the curriculum is focused on educating the audience on all stages of drug development and related research and business processes ¿ from discovery and translational science and how to launch new projects to analyzing data, communication and interpretation of results of clinical trials, regulatory issues and commercial considerations in product development. The emphasis will be on cardiovascular applications. Proposed seminar topics are attached and include How Drugs Are Discovered and Developed, Case Studies of the various challenges in Drug Development, Cardiac Safety, Moving a Compound through the Drug Development Process, and the FDA Advisory Committee Process.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

MED 226: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (EPI 237, INTLPOL 290)

(Formerly IPS 290 and HRP 237) How do you come up with an idea for a useful research project in a low resource setting? How do you develop a research question, prepare a concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, complex cultural situations, and unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aimed at graduate students interested in global health research, though students of all disciplines interested in practical methods for research are welcome. Undergraduates who have completed 85 units or more may enroll with instructor consent. Sign up for 1 unit credit to audit class sessions or 3 units to both participate in classes and develop a concept note.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Laws, A. (PI)

MED 232: Global Health: Scaling Health Technology Innovations in Low Resource Settings

Recent advances in health technologies - incorporating innovations like robotics, cloud computing, artificial intelligence, and smart sensors - have raised expectations of a dramatic impact on health outcomes across the world. However, bringing innovative technologies to low resource settings has proven challenging, limiting their impact. This course explores critical questions regarding the implementation and impact of technological innovations in low resource settings. The course will feature thought leaders from the health technology community, who will explore examples of technologies that have been successful in low resource communities, as well as those that have failed. Students will think critically to consider conditions under which technologies reach scale and have positive impact in the global health field. This course is open to undergraduate students, graduate students, and medical students. Undergraduates can take this course for a letter grade and 3 units. Graduate stude more »
Recent advances in health technologies - incorporating innovations like robotics, cloud computing, artificial intelligence, and smart sensors - have raised expectations of a dramatic impact on health outcomes across the world. However, bringing innovative technologies to low resource settings has proven challenging, limiting their impact. This course explores critical questions regarding the implementation and impact of technological innovations in low resource settings. The course will feature thought leaders from the health technology community, who will explore examples of technologies that have been successful in low resource communities, as well as those that have failed. Students will think critically to consider conditions under which technologies reach scale and have positive impact in the global health field. This course is open to undergraduate students, graduate students, and medical students. Undergraduates can take this course for a letter grade and 3 units. Graduate students and MD students can enroll for 2 units. Students enrolling in the course for a third unit will also work on group projects, each of which will focus on the potential opportunity for a health technology in a low resource setting and consider approaches to ensure its impact at scale. Students enrolled in the class for three units will also have additional assignments, including weekly discussion posts. Students must submit an application and be selected to receive an enrollment code. The application form can be found at the following link: https://tinyurl.com/med232. Contact Olivia Paige with any questions: olivia.paige@stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit
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