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431 - 440 of 793 results for: Medicine

MATSCI 381: Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine (BIOE 361)

Materials design and engineering for regenerative medicine. How materials interact with cells through their micro- and nanostructure, mechanical properties, degradation characteristics, surface chemistry, and biochemistry. Examples include novel materials for drug and gene delivery, materials for stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry, and cell/molecular biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

ME 571: Surgical Robotics Seminar (CS 571)

Surgical robots developed and implemented clinically on varying scales. Seminar goal is to expose students from engineering, medicine, and business to guest lecturers from academia and industry. Engineering and clinical aspects connected to design and use of surgical robots, varying in degree of complexity and procedural role. May be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Repeatable for credit

MED 1A: Leadership in Multicultural Health

Designed for undergraduates serving as staff for the Stanford Medical Youth Science Summer Residential Program (SRP). Structured opportunitie to learn, observe, participate in, and evaluate leadership development, multicultural health theories and practices, and social advocacy. Utilizes service learning as a pedagogical approach to developing an understanding of the intersections between identity, power and privilege and disparities (health, education, environment), fostering knowledge and skills to become social advocates to address forms of inequities. Students explore approaches for identifying and tackling issues of equity (health and education) as well as learn fundamental skills necessary to implement activities for the Summer Residential Program.
Last offered: Spring 2020

MED 1B: Identity, Power and Privilege in Multicultural Health

An independent study service learning course designed to develop students' understanding of the intersection between identity, power, privilege, and disparities (health, education, environment). Students submit a written reflective term paper based on their experience as staff for the Summer Residential Program as well as their understanding of how constructs of identity, power and privilege impact low-income and underrepresented students in their pursuit of higher education. Prerequisite MED 1A.
Last offered: Winter 2019

MED 50N: Translational Research: Turning Science into Medicine

Investigates how scientific research informs how physicians take care of patients and how clinical research informs how scientific experiments are conducted. Topics include how these two processes have improved health and have resulted in innovation and scientic progress; specific human disease areas in allergy and immunology that affect all ages of patients globally, including food allergy; scientific concepts of research that helped in discovery of novel diagnostics and treatment of disease; ethical roles of physicians and scientists in conducting translational research in human disease.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

MED 50Q: Respiration

Preference to sophomores. Topics include: the biological basis for use of oxygen for aerobic metabolism in animals, human lung physiology and pathophysiology, comparative physiology of respiration in fish, birds and mammals, new insights into mammalian lung development, current challenges in human respiratory health including air pollution and lung cancer. Student presentations on specific topics based on literature research developed in consultation with the instructor. Application required.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

MED 51B: Compassionate Presence at the Bedside: The Healer's Art

Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice com more »
Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice compassionate and respectful communication strategies, learn how to be a cam, compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of seriously ill patients. We believe that medical school curricula do not have a strong focus on essential doctoring skills related to communication and a compassionate presence at the bedside. By offering this course to pre-med students, we believe that the doctors of the future will become skilled and compassionate healers.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 30 units total)

MED 51Q: Cultivate a Compassionate Presence: An Aging and End-of-Life Care Practicum

This is a Community Engaged Learning Course for undergraduate students. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagement of patients within the context of aging and end of life. The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting. Using a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual-cultural framework, students learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of geriatrics and palliative care. Students will be exposed to the challenges faced by patients from diverse backgrounds and their caregivers.nThe class has a strong practicum aspect by which students will be trained to cultivate a compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of the patient. After completing formal volunteer training, each student will be assigned a small panel of patients. Students will work with an inter-disciplinary team, conduct regular hous more »
This is a Community Engaged Learning Course for undergraduate students. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagement of patients within the context of aging and end of life. The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting. Using a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual-cultural framework, students learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of geriatrics and palliative care. Students will be exposed to the challenges faced by patients from diverse backgrounds and their caregivers.nThe class has a strong practicum aspect by which students will be trained to cultivate a compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of the patient. After completing formal volunteer training, each student will be assigned a small panel of patients. Students will work with an inter-disciplinary team, conduct regular house calls on patients in their panel, and write progress notes, which will become a part of the patients' electronic medical records. Through mentored fieldwork, students will learn the basic competencies of communicating with older adults from diverse backgrounds in a respectful and compassionate manner. Students will be taught to discuss their panel of patients in class every week using the standard medical clinical rounds approach. Weekly assignments will help students reflect on their interactions with the patients and lessons they learned. Our goal is to train future leaders in the fields of healthcare, law, sociology, public policy, and humanities in the vital area of aging and end-of-life care for diverse Americans.nPLEASE NOTE: This IntroSem is a Cardinal Course. Students who enroll in MED 51Q will be working directly with patients. As a prerequisite for patient-care, all students (a) must complete TB testing, HIPAA training, patient safety training, and background check; (b) must be able to perform the physical activities required for patient care which includes the ability to frequently stand, walk, twist, bend, stoop, squat and occasionally lift, carry, push, and pull objects that weigh up to 40 pounds and assist patients into their wheelchairs and take them on walks. All tests required will be provided free of cost and have to be completed with specific agencies affiliated with Stanford. Failure to complete paperwork will result in student being dropped from the class. Professor Periyakoil will send more specific directions after students are enrolled in MED 51Q.
Last offered: Spring 2020

MED 52Q: What is a Human? Scientific and Mythological Approaches to Meaning

Reconciling our mythology and current scientific consensus is a worthwhile pursuit to establish a balanced, congruent personal philosophy toward life. nIn this sophomore seminar, we will first explore scientific perspectives on the origin and evolution of humans utilizing archaeology, genetics, and evolutionary psychology. With this framework secured, we will sample major religious texts such as Genesis, The New Testament, and Eastern texts. Throughout the course, each student will have opportunities to reflect deeply on his or her own personal worldview (past, present, and future) to tailor a personalized philosophy for life. This course will provide you with an overview of a fascinating subject that can impact progress on your life journey and career.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

MED 53Q: Storytelling in Medicine

Stories are at the core of medical practice, but the skills developed are applicable across disciplines, including technology and business. Storytelling in Medicine is a new sophomore seminar designed to teach skills in multiple modalities of storytelling including narrative, oral, social media, academic presentations and visual storytelling for different audiences. This seminar combines small groups, interactive workshops, and guest speakers who are experts in their fields of medicine. This will also include editing and support to complete your own story by the end of the seminar.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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