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301 - 310 of 787 results for: Medicine

GENE 202: Human Genetics

Utilizes lectures and small group activities to develop a working knowlege of human genetics as applicable to clinical medicine. Basic principles of inheritance, risk assessment, and population genetics are illustrated using examples drawn from diverse areas of medical genetics practice including prenatal, pediatric, adult and cancer genetics. Practical aspects of molecular and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are emphasized. Existing and emerging treatment strategies for single gene disorders are also covered. Prerequisites: basic genetics. Only available to MD and MOM students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

GENE 210: Genomics and Personalized Medicine (DBIO 220)

Principles of genetics underlying associations between genetic variants and disease susceptibility and drug response. Topics include: genetic and environmental risk factors for complex genetic disorders; design and interpretation of genome-wide association studies; pharmacogenetics; full genome sequencing for disease gene discovery; population structure and genetic ancestry; use of personal genetic information in clinical medicine; ethical, legal, and social issues with personal genetic testing. Hands-on workshop making use of personal or publicly available genetic data. Prerequisite: GENE 202, Gene 205 or BIOS 200.
Last offered: Spring 2015

GENE 217: Translational Bioinformatics (BIOE 217, BIOMEDIN 217, CS 275)

Computational methods for the translation of biomedical data into diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications in medicine. Topics: multi-scale omics data generation and analysis, utility and limitations of public biomedical resources, machine learning and data mining, issues and opportunities in drug discovery, and mobile/digital health solutions. Case studies and course project. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with biology and statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

GS 182: Field Trip to Cascade Volcanoes of California

Three-day field trip (involving light hiking and camping) to study active and dormant volcanoes of northern California, including Mt. Shasta, Mt. Lassen, and Medicine Lake, and their relationship to regional extensional faulting. Features visited include stratovolcanoes, cinder cones, lava caves, obsidian flows, hot springs and hydrothermal alteration, volcanic blast deposits and mudflows, debris avalanches, fault scarps. Recommended: 1 or equivalent. Limited enrollment; preference to frosh, sophs, and undergraduates and graduates majoring in SE3.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

GSBGEN 368: Managing Difficult Conversations

This elective 3- unit course is offered to JD law students and other selected graduate students, and to MBA students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult interpersonal situations. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Lafayette Partners Lecturer in Strategic Management, Stanford Graduate School of Business and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which will be case-based, will involve frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic medical interactions and difficult interpersonal situations. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. There will be ten classes held on Wednesdays beginning January 8th and concluding on March 11th. Each class w more »
This elective 3- unit course is offered to JD law students and other selected graduate students, and to MBA students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult interpersonal situations. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Lafayette Partners Lecturer in Strategic Management, Stanford Graduate School of Business and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which will be case-based, will involve frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic medical interactions and difficult interpersonal situations. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. There will be ten classes held on Wednesdays beginning January 8th and concluding on March 11th. Each class will begin promptly at 12:30 and end shortly before 3 pm. Students will be expected to attend all classes unless excused in advance. Class preparation will include reading of assigned cases; analysis of the cases and recommendations as to how to confront specific difficult conversations (consistent with assigned study questions); and reading of assigned background material. It is important that all students participate actively in classroom discussions. For GSB students, 50% of the final grade will depend on classroom performance; the remainder will be based on a final written assignment of 3-5 pages. GSB students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The course will be ungraded for medical students, residents and fellows. All students will be expected to complete the written assignment. Class size will be limited to 40 students per the following: (1) a maximum of 20 MBA students and (2) a maximum of 20 non-GHB graduate students.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 551: Innovation and Management in Health Care

The health care system accounts for 18% of US GDP and is one of the fastest growing segments of the economy. This two unit class focuses on the interplay and tension between the main players in the health care field - providers of health care services (individual doctors, group practices, integrated health care systems), payors (insurances companies, employers, consumers, and government), patients, and innovator companies (biopharma, medical device, diagnostics, and health care IT). The course is designed for students with a broad diversity of backgrounds and interests who want to better understand the health care business and system. No prior experience in the health care or medical field is assumed or needed. The focus of the class will be primarily on the US health care system, but there will be limited discussion of non-US systems as well. The course is divided into four modules: An overview of the US Health Care System and the interplay between payers, providers, innovators, and p more »
The health care system accounts for 18% of US GDP and is one of the fastest growing segments of the economy. This two unit class focuses on the interplay and tension between the main players in the health care field - providers of health care services (individual doctors, group practices, integrated health care systems), payors (insurances companies, employers, consumers, and government), patients, and innovator companies (biopharma, medical device, diagnostics, and health care IT). The course is designed for students with a broad diversity of backgrounds and interests who want to better understand the health care business and system. No prior experience in the health care or medical field is assumed or needed. The focus of the class will be primarily on the US health care system, but there will be limited discussion of non-US systems as well. The course is divided into four modules: An overview of the US Health Care System and the interplay between payers, providers, innovators, and patients, Provider delivery models, health care information technology, and incentive structures - The relationship between quality, cost, and access - Integrated systems, value-based, and fee for service models - New IT technologies, including electronic data records - The role of information and incentives - Innovator business models and issues - Financing and managing new product development - Clinical trial management and gaining regulatory approval - Marketing, reimbursement, and sales strategies - Business models to drive innovation - Health care system reform The class will be taught primarily from the perspective of a business person operating a company rather than that of a policy maker, academic, or investor. While there will be a few lectures to provide background and frameworks for course topics, most classes will involve a case discussion and prominent guest speakers from the health care industry. Speakers will include CEOs and senior executives from Genomic Health, Blue Shield of California, Tenet Health, Venrock, Burd Health, Verily (Google Health), Myovant, and Stanford Medicine.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Chess, R. (PI)

GSBGEN 568: Managing Difficult Conversations

This elective 2-unit course is offered to all medical students, residents, and fellows, and to GSB students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult interpersonal situations. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Lafayette Partners Lecturer in Strategic Management, Stanford Graduate School of Business and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which will be case-based, will involve frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic medical interactions and difficult interpersonal situations. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. There will be seven classes held on Wednesdays beginning April 10th and concluding on May 22nd. Students will be expec more »
This elective 2-unit course is offered to all medical students, residents, and fellows, and to GSB students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult interpersonal situations. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Lafayette Partners Lecturer in Strategic Management, Stanford Graduate School of Business and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which will be case-based, will involve frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic medical interactions and difficult interpersonal situations. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. There will be seven classes held on Wednesdays beginning April 10th and concluding on May 22nd. Students will be expected to attend all classes unless excused in advance. Class preparation will include reading of assigned cases; analysis of the cases and recommendations as to how to confront specific difficult conversations (consistent with assigned study questions); and reading of assigned background material. It is important that all students participate actively in classroom discussions. For GSB students, 50% of the final grade will depend on classroom performance; the remainder will be based on a final written assignment of 3-5 pages. GSB students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The course will be ungraded for medical students, residents and fellows. All students will be expected to complete the written assignment. Class size will be limited to 40 students per the following: (1) a maximum of 20 GSB students and (2) a maximum of 20 medical students, residents, and fellows.
Last offered: Spring 2019

HISTORY 12: Medicine and Disease in the Ancient World

(Same as HISTORY 112. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 112.) This course explores medicine and disease through case studies from civilizations of the ancient world such as Egypt, Greece, and Peru. We will discuss how these cultures conceptualized disease, and in turn, how they contended with illnesses. Lectures will address different forms of illness through medical texts, art, and human remains. Weekly discussion will incorporate evidence from these sources to explore both their potential and their limitations.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

HISTORY 23S: Sex and Socialism

Among the major promises made by socialism and communism was the liberation of women from an imperialist, capitalist, and patriarchal world. How did these promises hold up in the face of the realities of revolution and state formation? This course explores the relationship between gender, sex, and sexuality within the state socialist polities of the 20th century. Topics include diversity in barricades and workplaces, motherhood and reproductive rights, medicine and sexology, incarceration and state violence, and homosexuality and gender non-conformity.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Signer, M. (PI)

HISTORY 40: World History of Science

( History 40 is 3 units; History 140 is 5 units.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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