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261 - 270 of 772 results for: Medicine

EMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 398A: CLINICAL ELECTIVE IN EMERGENCY MEDICINE

Open to visitors. Provides an opportunity for a student in the clinical years to have an individualized clinical experience in one of the fields of Emergency Medicine. The quality and duration of the elective will be decided by both the student and a faculty preceptor in the Department of Emergency Medicine. Please note: Students cannot add 398A clerkships directly to their fishbowl schedules through the regular shuffles. Please contact Caroline Cheang in the Office of Medical Student Affairs at cheang@stanford.edu or 650-498-7619 with the faculty preceptor¿s name and email address to add this clerkship. Prereq: Core clerkships in medicine, surgery and pediatrics. Passing score USMLE I (and II if taken) on first attempt. Periods Avail: Periods 1-12 only. This clerkship does not take International visiting students. 6 students per period. Pre-approval is required for visiting students only from the department before formal application submission. Please send your CV and Cover Letter to Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu). Pre-approval dates are as follows: Periods 7-9 ( August 1-5), Periods 10-12 (October 1-5). No students may be added less than three weeks prior to start of each rotation. Reporting Instructions: Where: TBA (designated faculty preceptor); Time: TBA Units: 1. Call Code: 0. Director: Jessica Ngo, M.D. at jngo@stanford.edu. nOther Faculty: Emergency Medicine Dept Faculty. Coord: Maria Alfonso (650-497-6702), malfonso@stanford.edu (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 398W: Clinical Elective in Emergency Medicine

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 399: Graduated Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 108: Disability Literature (HUMBIO 177)

This course explores literary and filmic narratives about disability in the Global South. Authors including Edwidge Danticat, Bapsi Sidhwa, and Ricardo Padilla highlight the unique aesthetic potential of what Michael Davidson calls the defamiliar body and Ato Quayson describes as aesthetic nervousness. While engaging universal issues of disability stigma, they also emphasize the specific geopolitics of disability and how people in the Global South face greater rates of impairment based on unequal exposure to embodied risk. The course particularly welcomes students with interests in fields of medicine, policy, or public health.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 118A: Illness in Literature

This class provides an overview of illness narratives in fiction from the 19th century to the present. We will examine how authors use language, plot, and structure to portray illness and even recreate its sensations within the reader. We will also study how domestic arrangements, art, medicine and technology mediate the experience of disease. Our discussion of fiction will be buttressed by theoretical texts about the function (and breakdown) of language when deployed to describe physical and mental suffering. Finally, we will consider the ethics of writing about illness. What does it mean to find beauty in descriptions of pain? What role can literature play in building empathy for experiences we have not (yet) experienced ourselves?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 185A: Literature and Medicine

Virginia Woolf once wrote, "The merest schoolgirl when she falls in love has Shakespeare or Keats to speak her mind for her, but let a sufferer try to describe a pain in his head to a doctor and language at once runs dry.¿ Problems of representation are at the heart of the experiences of physical suffering and medical care; how has literature defined and redefined its relationship to these experiences? Topics include medical and literary interpretation, illness and metaphor, and the evolution of the surface-depth model of the self. The course centers on major works of literature that engage the imaginative potential of medicine and the narrative structures of disease, by authors including Jane Austen, Leo Tolstoy, and Arthur Conan Doyle, read alongside paintings (Rembrandt's The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp), film (Ingmar Bergman's Cries and Whispers), medical descriptions of disease, diagnostic tools, and theory (e.g., Sontag's Illness as Metaphor).
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ENGR 155C: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (CME 106)

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Instructors: Khayms, V. (PI)

ETHICSOC 131X: Ethics in Bioengineering (BIOE 131)

Bioengineering focuses on the development and application of new technologies in the biology and medicine. These technologies often have powerful effects on living systems at the microscopic and macroscopic level. They can provide great benefit to society, but they also can be used in dangerous or damaging ways. These effects may be positive or negative, and so it is critical that bioengineers understand the basic principles of ethics when thinking about how the technologies they develop can and should be applied. On a personal level, every bioengineer should understand the basic principles of ethical behavior in the professional setting. This course will involve substantial writing, and will use case-study methodology to introduce both societal and personal ethical principles, with a focus on practical applications.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

ETHICSOC 133: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER
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