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251 - 260 of 787 results for: Medicine

EMED 313A: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Overall Description: During this 3-week, dual-site selective, medical students will develop critical skills in the rapid evaluation and management of undifferentiated and acutely ill patients at the new, state of the art Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC). Students will also be paired with a faculty coach in order to maximize educational opportunities and feedback over the three weeks. With this high level of mentorship and guidance, learners will gain confidence assessing and resuscitating the incredible spectrum of patients presenting at each of these clinical sites. Clinical Duties: Students will work 10-11, 8-hour clinical shifts during the rotation. Rotators will have the opportunity to play an integral role on the care team, learning to take full responsibility in ensuring their patients receive high quality emergency care. Students will lead the initial assessment of each patient, performing complain more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Overall Description: During this 3-week, dual-site selective, medical students will develop critical skills in the rapid evaluation and management of undifferentiated and acutely ill patients at the new, state of the art Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC). Students will also be paired with a faculty coach in order to maximize educational opportunities and feedback over the three weeks. With this high level of mentorship and guidance, learners will gain confidence assessing and resuscitating the incredible spectrum of patients presenting at each of these clinical sites. Clinical Duties: Students will work 10-11, 8-hour clinical shifts during the rotation. Rotators will have the opportunity to play an integral role on the care team, learning to take full responsibility in ensuring their patients receive high quality emergency care. Students will lead the initial assessment of each patient, performing complaint-directed history and physical exam, developing a focused differential diagnosis, and then designing and implementing a targeted care plan with input and support from the attending physician. Students will also learn essential communication skills, acting as the primary contact between the care team, patients, patient's families, consultants and hospital staff. Educational Curriculum: Throughout the rotation, students will have access to a number of supporting educational events outside of the emergency department. Students will attend weekly core curriculum conference with the Stanford Emergency Medicine residents, as well as a monthly journal club. Rotators will also have dedicated, student oriented educational sessions focused on bedside ultrasound, laceration repair, orthopedic injury management, and ECG interpretation, as well as a series of interactive, faculty-led, case discussions. A student-only simulation experience held at Stanford's innovative Center for Immersive and Simulation Based Learning early in the rotation will help faculty and students develop specific learning plans. The rotation culminates in a final written exam. Visiting students ONLY accepted periods 1-8, 16, pre-approval is required only for visiting students (PLEASE NOTE: **Due to policies around COVID-19, we will not be taking visiting students in the 2020-2021 academic year.**Pre-approval dates: Periods 1-4 (March 19-23), Period 4-8 (June 19-23), and Period 16 (December 1-5). Please contact clerkship coordinator Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu) to inquire about pre approval process and materials needed for submission. PREREQUISITES: Completed all core clerkships in medicine, surgery, OB/GYN, and pediatrics. Stanford medical students must complete MED 313A. Exceptions only at the discretion of the clerkship director on a case by case basis. PERIODS AVAILABLE: Periods 1-8 and 15-16 only for 2020-21, Periods 1-8 and 16 only. Closed Periods 9-15 for 2021-22. Full-time for 3 weeks, 10 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: William Dixon, MD at wdixon@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: 900 Welch Road Suite 350; Time: TBA. Coordinator will email details one week prior to the first day of the rotation block. CALL CODE: 2 (No call, but a mixture of at least 3 overnights and/or weekend shifts during the EMED block.) OTHER FACULTY: Emergency Dept. Faculty. LOCATION: SUMC, KPMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

EMED 313D: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: This rotation focuses on the clinical practice of Emergency Medicine. The 3 week rotation consists of 10 clinical shifts in the emergency department. There are no required supplemental didactic sessions. Orientation will occur on the first day of the rotation in the Kaiser GME office (Dept. 384 MOB, Susan Krause). Faculty will orient medical students to the Emergency Department after your meeting in the GME office. Clinical shifts will consist of approximately 10 8-10 hour shifts, which will be a mix of daytime, evening, overnight, and weekend shifts. Students will usually work 1:1 with an EM attending to maximize learning. Each patient seen by the student is presented to an EM attending staff physician. Students should present each patient upon completing history and physical examination in a timely fashion. EM residents will give daily informal lectures at 4pm, which students are encouraged to attend when on s more »
VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: This rotation focuses on the clinical practice of Emergency Medicine. The 3 week rotation consists of 10 clinical shifts in the emergency department. There are no required supplemental didactic sessions. Orientation will occur on the first day of the rotation in the Kaiser GME office (Dept. 384 MOB, Susan Krause). Faculty will orient medical students to the Emergency Department after your meeting in the GME office. Clinical shifts will consist of approximately 10 8-10 hour shifts, which will be a mix of daytime, evening, overnight, and weekend shifts. Students will usually work 1:1 with an EM attending to maximize learning. Each patient seen by the student is presented to an EM attending staff physician. Students should present each patient upon completing history and physical examination in a timely fashion. EM residents will give daily informal lectures at 4pm, which students are encouraged to attend when on shift. PREREQUISITES: Surgery 300A, Medicine 300A, Obstetrics & Gynecology 300A and Pediatric 300A, passing score USMLE I (and II if taken) on first attempt. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for 3 weeks, 2 students per period. No students may be added less than 3 weeks prior to the start of each rotation. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Alice Chao, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Susan Krause, 408-851-3836. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: GME office, Homestead Medical Office Building at 710 Lawrence Expressway, Dept 384; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 2. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: KPMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

EMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 398A: CLINICAL ELECTIVE IN EMERGENCY MEDICINE

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Provides an opportunity for a student in the clinical years to have an individualized clinical experience in one of the fields of Emergency Medicine. The quality and duration of the elective will be decided by both the student and a faculty preceptor in the Department of Emergency Medicine. Please note: Students cannot add 398A clerkships directly to their fishbowl schedules through the regular shuffles. Please contact Caroline Cheang in the Office of Medical Student Affairs at cheang@stanford.edu or 650-498-7619 with the faculty preceptor's name and email address to add this clerkship. PREREQUISITES: Core clerkships in Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Surgery, and Pediatrics. Passing score on USMLE I. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for 3 weeks, 6 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: N. Nounou Taleghani MD, PhD. at Nounou@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Maria Alfonso, 650-497-6702, malfonso@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: TBA; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Emergency Department Faculty. LOCATION: SUMC
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

EMED 398W: Clinical Elective in Emergency Medicine

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 18 units total)

EMED 399: Graduated Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 72 units total)

ENGLISH 118A: Illness in Literature

This class provides an overview of illness narratives in fiction from the 19th century to the present. We will examine how authors use language, plot, and structure to portray illness and even recreate its sensations within the reader. We will also study how domestic arrangements, art, medicine and technology mediate the experience of disease. Our discussion of fiction will be buttressed by theoretical texts about the function (and breakdown) of language when deployed to describe physical and mental suffering. Finally, we will consider the ethics of writing about illness. What does it mean to find beauty in descriptions of pain? What role can literature play in building empathy for experiences we have not (yet) experienced ourselves?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGR 155C: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (CME 106)

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Numerical simulation using Monte Carlo techniques. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses. Numerous applications in engineering, manufacturing, reliability and quality assurance, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME100/ENGR154 or Math 51 or 52.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR

EPI 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, MED 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EPI 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
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