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21 - 30 of 772 results for: Medicine

ANES 301A: Intensive Care Unit Clerkship

Open to visitors. Designed to give medical students an in-depth exposure to critical care medicine. It offers students an opportunity to apply physiologic and pharmacologic principles utilizing sophisticated monitoring techniques to the care of critically ill patients. Students are closely supervised in total patient care and gain experience in a variety of technical skills. Although pulmonary, hemodynamic, and renal aspects of care are stressed, experience in all phases of surgical and medical patient care are provided. Students wishing to do this clerkship must get approval from Bernadette Carvalho first before registering. Prereq: Anesthesia 306A or Medicine and Surgery core clerkships. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: E2 300P (Medical-Surgical ICU at Stanford); Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 4. Director: Erin Hennessey, M.D Other Faculty: T. Angelotti, R. Asklakson, G. Dhillon, J. Levitt, J. Lorenzo, F. Mihm, T. Mitarai, P. Mohabir, R. Pearl, N. Rizk, A. Rogers, S. Ruoss, A. Weinacker, J. Wilson. Coord: Bernadette F. Carvalho (berniec@stanford.edu).(SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

ANES 306P: Critical Care Core Clerkship

Required Clerkship. Closed to visitors. During this rotation, students provide care for critically ill children at Packard Children's Hospital. The rotation consists of a 4-week block in the NICU or the PICU. The Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) has moved into the new hospital building and is a busy 36-bed academic unit that teaches students to recognize and care for critically ill children. The patients are comprised of medical, surgical, and trauma patients both from within LPCH or are referred from other hospitals throughout Northern California. The medical admissions cover a broad range of disease processes ranging from respiratory failure, to shock, to multi-system organ dysfunction. Surgical patients represent diverse pathologies and vary from solid organ transplants to various types of neurosurgical procedures to multiple other general and sub-specialty procedures. Students will learn the pathophysiology of critical illness in children, understand the many monitoring devices more »
Required Clerkship. Closed to visitors. During this rotation, students provide care for critically ill children at Packard Children's Hospital. The rotation consists of a 4-week block in the NICU or the PICU. The Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) has moved into the new hospital building and is a busy 36-bed academic unit that teaches students to recognize and care for critically ill children. The patients are comprised of medical, surgical, and trauma patients both from within LPCH or are referred from other hospitals throughout Northern California. The medical admissions cover a broad range of disease processes ranging from respiratory failure, to shock, to multi-system organ dysfunction. Surgical patients represent diverse pathologies and vary from solid organ transplants to various types of neurosurgical procedures to multiple other general and sub-specialty procedures. Students will learn the pathophysiology of critical illness in children, understand the many monitoring devices used in the ICU, and become familiar with the various treatment modalities available for organ failure ranging from mechanical ventilation to ECMO. The basic differences in both pathophysiology and management of critically ill children as compared to adults should also become apparent. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) offers an intensive experience in the management of premature and sick term neonates admitted from the delivery room, community physicians' offices, and an active referral service that draws from throughout Northern and mid-coastal California. The rotation emphasizes delivery room experience and newborn resuscitation skills, daily management of common newborn problems, and the special follow-up needs of NICU graduates. Exposure to advanced therapies including mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide therapy, and hypothermia occurs routinely. An active maternal-fetal medicine service, pediatric surgery, and various pediatric subspecialty services support the NICU. Education in both units will occur via daily morning rounds, caring for patients, scheduled didactic sessions, and interactions with ICU attendings, fellows, and residents. Absences during the 306P clerkship: Students must contact the 306P Clerkship Director to obtain explicit advance approval for any planned absence from the clerkship. Students who anticipate missing a week (i.e., 5 weekdays) or more of the 306P Clerkship are encouraged to reschedule this clerkship during a different period. Unanticipated absences for illness or emergency must be communicated to the Clerkship Director as promptly as possible. Students with more than 2 days of unexcused absences (i.e., 3-5 days) will be required to make up one week at a later date. If the absence is longer, the time will be proportionately increased. Taking extra night or weekend call will not be considered a suitable substitute for missing weekdays during the clerkship. Arrangements to make up missed time must be made by the student with the 306P Clerkship Director. Students who miss either of the day-long ICU Medical Student Simulator courses will need to make these experiences up at a later date in order to receive a passing grade for this clerkship. Prerequisites: Peds 300A and Surg 300A. Reporting instructions: PICU: If assigned to Team-A, report to on service Attending physician / PICU fellow in PICU, LPCH Main 420 Team room 4th floor; If assigned to Team-B, report to on service Attending physician / PICU fellow in PICU, LPCH Main 320 Team room 3rd floor, NICU: Report to on service Attending physician / NIC fellow in NICU, LPCH West 2nd floor. (LPCH)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

ANES 308A: Associated Anesthesiologists Community Anesthesia Clerkship

Open to vsitors. Exposes students to the fundamentals of community anesthetic practice in the Stanford Hospital Operating Room and in four private outpatient surgical facilities. In the Stanford Hospital clinical setting, under close preceptor supervision (by a private anesthesiologist faculty member), students have the opportunity to learn principles of preoperative evaluation of patients, intraoperative monitoring techniques, assessment of cardiovascular and respiratory status, and the opportunity learn a variety of technical skills including airway management, endotracheal intubation, and intravenous line placement, which will be of value in any clinical specialty. Didactic lectures and clinical conferences are available during this rotation. Students will work closely with their preceptor during the two-week clerkship. As all the patients on this rotation are private, in the non-Stanford Hospital locations the student will be able to observe but not do procedures. Students must obtain approval prior to registering for this clerkship. Prerequisites: A major clerkship in medicine or surgery is strongly recommended. Reporting instructions: Where: Control Desk at Stanford Operating Room (contact Dr. Richard Novak by email three to four weeks before); Time: 6:55 am. (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit

ANES 340B: Critical Care Clerkship

Open to visitors. This clerkship provides experience managing adult patients in a critical care unit. Students learn how to optimize care for the acutely ill patient and the multidisciplinary approach to complex patients. Teaching emphasizes the review of basic organ physiology, the ability to determine the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in critical illness, and the formulation of a physiologic based treatment plan. Students gain experience with the implementation of monitoring and therapeutic devices used in the intensive care units and begin to become adept at the evaluation, stabilization and management of the most critically ill patients expected to be encountered in today's acute care hospitals. Ward rounds, bedside evaluation and treatment, and individual interactions with attending, fellows and residents are part of the educational process. Students must attend mandatory simulator courses in order to receive passing grade for this clerkship.Students wishing to do this clerkship must get approval from Bernadette Carvalho first before registering. Prerequisites: Anesthesia 306A or Medicine and Surgery core clerkships. Reporting instructions: Where: PAVAMC, MSICU, 3rd Floor; Time: 8:00 am. (PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

ANTHRO 82: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 282, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 82P: The Literature of Psychosis (HUMBIO 162L, PSYC 82, PSYC 282)

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a complex concept. It can be terrifying and devastating for patients and families, and yet shares characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis. We will approach it from multiple perspectives, including clinical descriptions, works of art, and texts by writers ranging from Shakespeare, to the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, to patients attempting to describe their experience. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Mason, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 119B: Tech Ethics and Ethnography: the human in human-computer interaction

Do machines have culture? How do engineers write themselves into their products? Can we better anticipate the unexpected and unwanted consequences of technologies?nnTaking as its point of departure the discipline of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), which examines the design and use of computer technology, this course shifts the focus to the humans creating and utilizing the technology. It invites us to think about computer science and social science together and learn how ethnographic methods can be utilized for ethical thinking and design in technology. This course will combine rigorous theoretical thinking with hands-on in-the-field research. Students will devise and engage in their own ethnographic research projects. This course will be of interest to students from a wide range of disciplines, including: computer science, engineering, medicine, anthropology, sociology, and the humanities. Our aim is to have a truly interdisciplinary and open-ended discussion about one of the most pressing social issues of our time, while giving students skills-based training in qualitative methods.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ANTHRO 137A: Traditional Medicine in the Modern World

This class considers "traditional medicine" in contemporary times. We will survey major systems of traditional medicine while considering their broader social, cultural, and political contexts. The class will study the symbolic uses of traditional medicine, the role of traditional medicines in early modern medical knowledge, the place of indigenous knowledge in bioprospecting, health-seeking behavior and medical pluralism, and the WHO's approach to traditional medicine and how it has affected government health policies. The class emphasizes a critical approach to the concepts of tradition and modernity, and an understanding of traditional medicine as a changing, flexible, and globalized category of healing.

ANTHRO 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 238, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER

ANTHRO 139C: Anthropology of Global Health

Global health has been the contested realm of theoretical debates and praxis in medical anthropology. Rationalities behind global health projects reflected the predominant mode of envisioning health in specific historical moments.nn· In this course, we will first assess the ways in which memories, materiality and institutions of the colonial past persist in the field of global health in Africa.nn· Secondly, we will explore how early medical anthropologists participated in international health projects in order to facilitate implementation of the Western biomedicine in developing countries by investigating cultural barriers under the post-war regime of international development in the efforts of controlling malaria and HIV/AIDS in Latin America. nn· Thirdly, we will examine achievements and limitations of subsequent critical medical anthropologists¿ shift of the focus of analysis on global health from culture to structure, larger political economic conditions that produced vast health i more »
Global health has been the contested realm of theoretical debates and praxis in medical anthropology. Rationalities behind global health projects reflected the predominant mode of envisioning health in specific historical moments.nn· In this course, we will first assess the ways in which memories, materiality and institutions of the colonial past persist in the field of global health in Africa.nn· Secondly, we will explore how early medical anthropologists participated in international health projects in order to facilitate implementation of the Western biomedicine in developing countries by investigating cultural barriers under the post-war regime of international development in the efforts of controlling malaria and HIV/AIDS in Latin America. nn· Thirdly, we will examine achievements and limitations of subsequent critical medical anthropologists¿ shift of the focus of analysis on global health from culture to structure, larger political economic conditions that produced vast health inequalities around the world, including World Bank policies under the Cold War and neoliberal reforms that increased the prevalence of TB and other diseases in post-socialist contexts nn· Finally, we will question previous anthropological discourses on global health and propose potential insights by understanding moral imaginations of contemporary global health participants such as WHO or Gates Foundation and humanitarian medicine such as MSF, and continuities and discontinuities of colonial and developmental past in current global health movement.
Last offered: Spring 2018
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