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181 - 190 of 792 results for: Medicine

CSRE 51C: Race in Medicine (AFRICAAM 51C, BIOE 91C, CEE 151C, HUMBIO 71C, STS 51C)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Spring quarter focuses on medicine. How do race and racism affect medical research and medical care? What accounts for health disparities among racial groups? What are the history, ethics, legal, and social issues surrounding racialized medical experiments and treatments? Invited speakers will address these and other issues. Talks will take a variety of forms: conversations, interviews, panels, and others. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

CSRE 66: Spectacular Trials: Sex, Race and Violence in Modern American Culture (AMSTUD 106)

This course will use the phenomenon of the spectacular trial as a framework for exploring the intersections of sex, race, and violence in the formation of modern American culture. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing through the 1990s, we will focus our inquiry on a number of notorious cases, some associated with familiar names¿the ¿Scottsboro Boys,¿ Emmett Till, O.J. Simpson¿others involving once-infamous actors¿like Joan Little and Inez Garcia¿whose ordeals have receded into historical memory, considering a range of questions arising from this thematic nexus. For instance, in what ways are sexual transgressions racialized and gendered? What are the practical and theoretical ramifications of the seemingly inextricable conjunction of sex and violence in legal and popular discourse? And what insights might such spectacles afford when broached as an arena in which sexual meanings, identities, and practices are refracted and ultimately constructed? We will also examine more »
This course will use the phenomenon of the spectacular trial as a framework for exploring the intersections of sex, race, and violence in the formation of modern American culture. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing through the 1990s, we will focus our inquiry on a number of notorious cases, some associated with familiar names¿the ¿Scottsboro Boys,¿ Emmett Till, O.J. Simpson¿others involving once-infamous actors¿like Joan Little and Inez Garcia¿whose ordeals have receded into historical memory, considering a range of questions arising from this thematic nexus. For instance, in what ways are sexual transgressions racialized and gendered? What are the practical and theoretical ramifications of the seemingly inextricable conjunction of sex and violence in legal and popular discourse? And what insights might such spectacles afford when broached as an arena in which sexual meanings, identities, and practices are refracted and ultimately constructed? We will also examine the role of the pertinent professions in the evolution of these events, in particular how the interplay of law, medicine, psychiatry, and forensic science helped define the shifting boundaries of legality, and how print, radio, and television journalism operated not only in sensationalizing, but also in reflecting, modeling, and shaping prevailing attitudes and behaviors. Our study of this vital facet of our ¿society of the spectacle¿ will draw on a series of compelling secondary readings complemented by a diverse array of primary sources¿from contemporaneous pamphlets and newspaper accounts to photographs, letters, trial testimony, and psychological commentary¿that will enable class members to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different textual genres, experiment with alternative methods of fashioning historical interpretations, and contemplate the ways history might be employed to illuminate the persistent problems of racial bias, reflexive sexualization, and the packaging of trials as mass entertainment in the present day.
Last offered: Winter 2016

CSRE 122F: Histories of Race in Science and Medicine at Home and Abroad (AFRICAAM 122F, AFRICAST 122F, HISTORY 248D)

This course has as its primary objective, the historical study of the intersection of race, science and medicine in the US and abroad with an emphasis on Africa and its Diasporas in the US. By drawing on literature from history, science and technology studies, sociology and other related disciplines, the course will consider the sociological and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category. The course will explore how the study of race became its own ¿science¿ in the late-Enlightenment era, the history of eugenics--a science of race aimed at the ostensible betterment of the overall population through the systematic killing or "letting die" of humanity¿s "undesirable" parts, discuss how the ideology of pseudo-scientific racism underpinned the health policies of the French and British Empires in Africa, explore the fraught relationship between race and medicine in the US, discuss how biological notions of race have quietly slipped back into scientific projects in the 21st century and explore how various social justice advocates and scholars have resisted the scientific racisms of the present and future and/or proposed new paths towards a more equitable and accessible science.
Last offered: Spring 2018

CSRE 133P: Ethics and Politics in Public Service (POLISCI 133Z, PUBLPOL 103Z, URBANST 122Z)

This course examines ethical and political questions that arise in doing public service work, whether volunteering, service learning, humanitarian endeavors overseas, or public service professions such as medicine and teaching. What motives do people have to engage in public service work? Are self-interested motives troublesome? What is the connection between service work and justice? Should the government or schools require citizens or students to perform service work? Is mandatory service an oxymoron?
Last offered: Summer 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

CSRE 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 138, ANTHRO 238)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER

CSRE 178: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER

CTS 225: Stem Cells in Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine

This course consists of didactic lectures and journal club presentations on the basic principles and translational applications of stem cells for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Another component of the course is peer-to-peer teaching by student-led journal club presentations. To synthesize knowledge gained from the course, the students will prepare a final report in the form of a research proposal. After completion of this course, the students should expect to: 1) Get broad exposure to basic and translational applications of stem cell research to cardiovascular medicine; and 2) Read, interpret, and orally present scientific literature. Prerequisite: Medical of graduate standing; undergraduates require instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

DANCE 100: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD (NENS 222)

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance cl more »
Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

DBIO 201: Cells and Signaling in Regenerative Medicine

Conserved molecular and cellular pathways regulate tissue and organ homeostasis. Errors in these pathways result in human diseases.nManipulation of key cells and signals is leading to new strategies for stimulating tissue formation and regeneration.nTopics: Stem cells. Molecules regulating stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Signaling pathways. Gene regulation. Embryonic stemncells. Programmed cell death. Cell lineage. Tissue regeneration. Use of stem cells in transplantation. Organoids. Emphasis on links between stem cells, signals, and clinically significant topics including diabetes, bone loss, cancer, and aging.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

DBIO 220: Genomics and Personalized Medicine (GENE 210)

Principles of genetics underlying associations between genetic variants and disease susceptibility and drug response. Topics include: genetic and environmental risk factors for complex genetic disorders; design and interpretation of genome-wide association studies; pharmacogenetics; full genome sequencing for disease gene discovery; population structure and genetic ancestry; use of personal genetic information in clinical medicine; ethical, legal, and social issues with personal genetic testing. Hands-on workshop making use of personal or publicly available genetic data. Prerequisite: GENE 202, Gene 205 or BIOS 200.
Last offered: Spring 2015
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