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121 - 130 of 772 results for: Medicine

CLASSICS 14: Greek and Latin Roots of English

(Formerly CLASSGEN 9) Goal is to improve vocabulary, comprehension of written English, and standardized test scores through learning the Greek and Latin components of English. Focus is on patterns and processes in the formation of the lexicon. Terminology used in medicine, business, education, law, and humanities; introduction to principles of language history and etymology. Greek or Latin not required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

CLASSICS 34: Ancient Athletics

How the Olympic Games developed and how they were organized. Many other Greek festivals featured sport and dance competitions, including some for women, and showcased the citizen athlete as a civic ideal. Roman athletics in contrast saw the growth of large-scale spectator sports and professional athletes. Some toured like media stars; others regularly risked death in gladiatorial contests and chariot-racing. We will also explore how large-scale games were funded and how they fostered the development of sports medicine. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required; enroll in sections on coursework.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 123: Ancient Medicine

Contemporary medical practice traces its origins to the creation of scientific medicine by Greek doctors such as Hippocrates and Galen. Is this something of which modern medicine can be proud? The scientific achievements and ethical limitations of ancient medicine when scientific medicine was no more than another form of alternative medicine. Scientific medicine competed in a marketplace of ideas where the boundaries between scientific and social aspects of medicine were difficult to draw.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI
Instructors: Netz, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 124: Ancient and Modern Medicine

Imagine a world where the Universe has a built-in purpose and point. How would this belief impact man's place in nature? Imagine a world where natural substances have "powers." How might this impact diet and pharmacology? Magical vs. scientific healing: a clear divide? Disease and dehumanization: epilepsy, rabies. Physical and mental health: black bile and melancholy. The ethical and scientific assumptions hidden in medical language and imagery. How ancient medicine and modern medicine (especially alternative medicine) illuminate each other.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

CME 106: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR 155C)

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Instructors: Khayms, V. (PI)

CME 279: Computational Biology: Structure and Organization of Biomolecules and Cells (BIOE 279, BIOMEDIN 279, BIOPHYS 279, CS 279)

Computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules and cells. These computational methods play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course topics include protein structure prediction, protein design, drug screening, molecular simulation, cellular-level simulation, image analysis for microscopy, and methods for solving structures from crystallography and electron microscopy data. Prerequisites: elementary programming background ( CS 106A or equivalent) and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CME 371: Computational Biology in Four Dimensions (BIOMEDIN 371, BIOPHYS 371, CS 371)

Cutting-edge research on computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules, cells, and everything in between. These techniques, which draw on approaches ranging from physics-based simulation to machine learning, play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course is devoted primarily to reading, presentation, discussion, and critique of papers describing important recent research developments. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent, and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry. Recommended: some experience in mathematical modeling (does not need to be a formal course).
Last offered: Winter 2018

COMM 177C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin,  http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite:  EarthSys 191/291,  COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from dr.yasmin@stanford.edu (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Yasmin, S. (PI)

COMM 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin,  http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite:  EarthSys 191/291,  COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from dr.yasmin@stanford.edu (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Yasmin, S. (PI)

COMPMED 11SC: Life in the Zoo: Behavior, Welfare and Enrichment

What makes for a good life in a zoo? For that matter, what makes a good zoo? The psychological and physical wellbeing of the animals? The contribution to research, conservation, and education? The guest experience? Students will learn first-hand how animal welfare science provides an evidence-based approach to optimize and balance each of these demands so that "good welfare is good business." Through a unique experience at San Francisco Zoo students will learn how to apply principles of animal behavior to design environmental enrichments which benefit both the animals and the complex mission of a zoo. Students will be guided through the process of assessing an exhibit from the point of view of the animal's behavior and wellbeing, educational opportunities, and guest experience; developing an enrichment plan; designing and building enrichments for the animals; interacting with the public as docents; and assessing the overall effectiveness of a new enrichment; before finally presenting t more »
What makes for a good life in a zoo? For that matter, what makes a good zoo? The psychological and physical wellbeing of the animals? The contribution to research, conservation, and education? The guest experience? Students will learn first-hand how animal welfare science provides an evidence-based approach to optimize and balance each of these demands so that "good welfare is good business." Through a unique experience at San Francisco Zoo students will learn how to apply principles of animal behavior to design environmental enrichments which benefit both the animals and the complex mission of a zoo. Students will be guided through the process of assessing an exhibit from the point of view of the animal's behavior and wellbeing, educational opportunities, and guest experience; developing an enrichment plan; designing and building enrichments for the animals; interacting with the public as docents; and assessing the overall effectiveness of a new enrichment; before finally presenting their work at a "mini-conference." The course will be taught with an emphasis on self-guided learning, student-led class time, hands-on experience, and service-learning. Most days will begin with students presenting what they have learned the previous day to the class, followed by student-led discussion, preparation time for the day's activities, and then time out in the zoo. The course will be taught by Dr. Garner (whose introductory seminar in Animal Behavior is strongly recommended, though not required) and Dr. Watters (Vice President of Animal Wellness and Animal Behavior, San Francisco Zoological Society). [This is a SOPHOMORE COLLEGE course. Visit soco.stanford.edu for full details.]
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Garner, J. (PI)
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