2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

101 - 110 of 772 results for: Medicine

BIOS 202: Hippocampal Field Potentials, an Introduction to CNS in Vitro Electrophysiology

Enrollment limited to graduate students in the School of Medicine; undergraduates may enroll with instructor consent. Introduces students to theory and practice of in vitro CNS electrophysiology. Lectures cover basic electrical and electrode theory, hippocampal anatomy, interpretation of these potentials, common pitfalls and misinterpretations, design of experiments using field potentials and other related topics. Practicum is hands on training in obtaining, recording and interpreting field potentials from in vitro hippocampal slices. Students develop skills in data collection, analysis and evaluation, art and design of electrophysiological studies of the brain.
Last offered: Winter 2013

BIOS 217: The Ultimate Face Book: Understanding Normal and Abnormal Craniofacial Development

How the face is assembled during embryonic development to gain insights into facial birth defects and new "regenerative medicine" approaches to reconstruct the face following disease or injury. Learn how "a man finds room in the few square inches of the face for the traits of all his ancestors; for the expression of all his history, and his wants."
Last offered: Winter 2013

BIOS 234: Personalized Genomic Medicine

Focuses on next-generation sequencing and its implications for personalized genomic medicine. Students gain hands-on experience with popular DNA sequence analysis tools as well as a practical understanding of the underlying algorithms and biomedicine.
Last offered: Spring 2016

BIOS 251: Biotechnology in the Natural World (SBIO 251)

Life can be found in some of the strangest and most inhospitable places of Earth. Whether in hot springs, oceanic depths, or dense rainforests, living organisms must be natural specialists to survive. This course explores a selection of strange and ingenious biomolecules that natural organisms have evolved in order to survive. Lectures will cover historical background as well as detailed investigations of the structure and function of selected biomolecules of interest. The majority of each lecture and discussion will focus on the adaptation of those molecules for fundamental and innovative approaches in modern biotechnology, especially in medicine and biophotonics. Key biophysical and biochemical techniques will be discussed as they are encountered within primary literature.
Last offered: Winter 2017

BIOS 285: Rodent Animal Models: Selection, Detection, Dissection, Inspection

This 2-week mini-course will discuss pragmatic approaches to rodent utilization with the aim of empowering graduate students across multiple disciplines to maximize rodent-derived data and minimize the redundant use of animals in biomedical research. Topics will include an introduction to clinical models, practical aspects of rodent blood collection and interpretation, algorithmic approaches to tissue collection for research applications, and an introduction to rodent histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Course instructors include board-certified laboratory animal medicine clinicians and comparative pathologists that are expert h these topics. This course is open to graduate students with or without prior rodent experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

CHEM 10: Exploring Research and Problem Solving Across the Sciences

Development and practice of critical problem solving and study skills using a wide variety of scientific examples that illustrate the broad yet integrated nature of current research. Students will build a problem solving tool-kit and apply chemical and mathematical concepts to solve problems related to energy, climate change, water resources, medicine, and food & nutrition. Note: course offered in August prior to start of fall quarter, and only Leland Scholar Program participants will register.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

CHEM 31M: Chemical Principles: From Molecules to Solids (MATSCI 31)

A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials and environmental science and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will emphasize bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, valence bond theory, and molecular orbital theory. Lectures will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techni more »
A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials and environmental science and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will emphasize bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, valence bond theory, and molecular orbital theory. Lectures will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and reiterate lecture concepts through hands-on activities. Specific discussions and laboratories will emphasize the structure, properties, and applications of molecules used in medicine, perovskites and organic dyes used in solar cells, and the dramatically different properties of materials made with only carbon atoms: diamond, graphite, graphene. There will be three lectures, one two-hour laboratory session, an optional 80-minute problem solving session each week. The course will assume familiarity with stoichiometry, unit conversions, and gas laws. Students earning an AP chemistry score of 4 should take CHEM 31M. Students earning an AP score of 5 are welcome to take CHEM 31M, as a refresher, or will receive credit for CHEM 31M. Students who have taken AP chemistry, but scored a 3 or lower, are welcome to take the placement test to place into CHEM 31M. CHEM 31M cannot be used to replace grades earned in CHEM 31X because previously given the courses are not equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

CHEM 121: Organic Chemistry of Bioactive Molecules

(Formerly CHEM 35) Focuses on the structure and reactivity of natural and synthetic bioactive molecules. Covers fundamental concepts underlying chemical reactivity and the logic of chemical synthesis for an appreciation of the profound impact of organic chemistry on humankind in fields ranging from medicine to earth and planetary science. A three hour lab section provides hands on experience with modern chemical methods for preparative and analytical chemistry. Prerequisite CHEM 33 or corequisite CHEM 100.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

CHEM 141: The Chemical Principles of Life I

This is the first course in a two-quarter sequence ( Chem 141/143), which will examine biological science through the lens of chemistry. In this sequence students will gain a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the molecular logic of cellular processes, which include expression and transmission of the genetic code, enzyme kinetics, biosynthesis, energy storage and consumption, membrane transport, and signal transduction. Connections to foundational principles of chemistry will be made through structure-function analyses of biological molecules. Integrated lessons in structural, mechanistic, and physical chemistry will underscore how molecular science and molecular innovation have impacted biology and medicine. Prerequisites: CHEM 121 (formerly 35), MATH 21 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

CHEM 143: The Chemical Principles of Life II

This is the second course in a two-quarter sequence ( Chem 141/143), which will continue the discussion of biological science through the lens of chemistry. In this sequence students will gain a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the molecular logic of cellular processes, which include expression and transmission of the genetic code, enzyme kinetics, biosynthesis, energy storage and consumption, membrane transport, and signal transduction. Connections to foundational principles of chemistry will be made through structure-function analyses of biological molecules. Integrated lessons in structural, mechanistic, and physical chemistry will underscore how molecular science and molecular innovation have impacted biology and medicine. Prerequisite: Chem 141.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints