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Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

101 - 110 of 789 results for: Medicine

BIOS 295: Metals in Biology and Medicine: Structure, Reactivity, Maintenance, and Utility

Transition metals play important roles in many key biological processes, from oxygen sensing and transport to chemical transformations critical for making DNA precursors. This course will focus on how metals in enzymes and proteins effect essential functions in biology and medicine. Emphasis is placed on examining how structures enable function, mechanisms of action, maintenance and homeostasis, and therapeutic or diagnostic opportunities. Using examples from the literature as case studies, students will engage in robust discussions that draw on principles from chemistry and biology. The course will appeal to anyone interested in working at the interface of these two disciplines.

BIOS 297: COVID-19 Pandemic: Lessons Learned

The Covid-19 pandemic has created unprecedented challenges for individuals, society, medicine and science. The SARS-Cov-2 virus rapidly disseminated since first reports from China on December 31, 2019 and by March 11, 2020 it was declared a global pandemicby the World Health Organization. This course will cover various aspects of Covid-19 including clinical perspectives, public health response, impact of disease modeling, and results of clinical trials and research efforts. As the pandemic evolves the course will discuss the most current data and reflect on successes and ongoing challenges as the world grapples with a pandemic of unmatched proportions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

BIOS 298: Cinematic Discoveries: A movie-based exploration of research rigor, communication and diversity

Through movie depictions of the vaccine discoveries leading to the first Nobel prizes in medicine, the infamous Tuskegee Study, the first heart surgery for Tetralogy of Fallot, the encephalitis lethargica pandemic, and modern oncology trials, the course will explore interdisciplinary work in biomedical sciences, research rigor, consent, stigma and discrimination, researchers¿ and health professionals¿ communication skills, and fundamentals of cinematography. The course will include a lecture, a movie projection and discussion each day for 5 days.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Goodman, S. (PI)

CEE 151A: Race in Science (AFRICAAM 51A, COMM 51A, CSRE 51A, HUMBIO 71A, STS 51A)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Fall quarter focuses on science. What is the science of race and racism? How does race affect scientific work? Weekly guest speakers will address such issues as the psychology and anthropology of race and racism; how race, language, and culture affect education; race in environmental science and environmental justice; the science of reducing police violence; and the role of race in genomic research. Talks will take a variety of forms, from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

CEE 151B: Race in Technology (AFRICAAM 51B, BIOE 91B, COMM 51B, CSRE 51B, HUMBIO 71B, STS 51B)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Winter quarter focuses on technology. How do race and racism affect the design and social impact of technology, broadly defined? Can new or different technology help to reduce racial bias? Invited speakers will address the role of race in such issues as energy infrastructure, nuclear arms control, algorithmic accountability, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology. Talks will take a variety of forms, ranging from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

CEE 151C: Race in Medicine (AFRICAAM 51C, BIOE 91C, CSRE 51C, HUMBIO 71C, STS 51C)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Spring quarter focuses on medicine. How do race and racism affect medical research and medical care? What accounts for health disparities among racial groups? What are the history, ethics, legal, and social issues surrounding racialized medical experiments and treatments? Invited speakers will address these and other issues. Talks will take a variety of forms: conversations, interviews, panels, and others. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

CHEM 10: Exploring Research and Problem Solving Across the Sciences

Development and practice of critical problem solving and study skills using a wide variety of scientific examples that illustrate the broad yet integrated nature of current research. Students will build a problem solving tool-kit and apply chemical and mathematical concepts to solve problems related to energy, climate change, water resources, medicine, and food & nutrition. Note: course offered in August prior to start of fall quarter, and only Leland Scholar Program participants will register.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

CHEM 31M: Chemical Principles: From Molecules to Solids (MATSCI 31)

A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials, environmental science, and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will describe bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, crystal-field theory, and molecular-orbital theory. We will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and more »
A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials, environmental science, and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will describe bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, crystal-field theory, and molecular-orbital theory. We will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and reiterate lecture concepts through hands-on activities. Specific discussions will include the structure, properties, and applications of molecules used in medicine, perovskites used in solar cells, and the dramatically different properties of materials with the same composition (for example: diamond, graphite, graphene). There will be three lectures, one two-hour laboratory session, and an optional 80-minute problem solving session each week. The course will assume familiarity with stoichiometry, unit conversions, and gas laws. All students who are interested in taking general chemistry at Stanford must take the Autumn 2020 General Chemistry Placement Test before Autumn quarter begins, regardless of chemistry background. Generally students earning an AP chemistry score of 4 or higher place into 31M. Students earning an AP score of 5 are also welcome to take the Autumn 2020 Chemistry 33 Placement Test to see if Chem33 is a more appropriate placement. Same as: MATSCI 31
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

CHEM 33: Structure and Reactivity of Organic Molecules

An introduction to organic chemistry, the molecular foundation to understanding of life, medicine, imaging, energy, and material science. Students will learn structural and bonding models of organic molecules that provide insights into chemical, physical, and reactivity properties, in addition to their biological activities, collectively contributing to the molecularization and thus advancement of many science disciplines. Combining these models with kinetic and thermodynamic analyses allows molecular conversions to be rationalized. Translation of this knowledge to more complex systems enables the synthesis of novel molecules or materials that can positively impact our science, society and environment. A two-hour weekly lab section accompanies the course to introduce the techniques of separation and identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 31B or CHEM 31M
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

CHEM 141: The Chemical Principles of Life I

This is the first course in a two-quarter sequence ( Chem 141/143), which will examine biological science through the lens of chemistry. In this sequence students will gain a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the molecular logic of cellular processes, which include expression and transmission of the genetic code, enzyme kinetics, biosynthesis, energy storage and consumption, membrane transport, and signal transduction. Connections to foundational principles of chemistry will be made through structure-function analyses of biological molecules. Integrated lessons in structural, mechanistic, and physical chemistry will underscore how molecular science and molecular innovation have impacted biology and medicine. Prerequisites: CHEM 121, MATH 21 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
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