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31 - 40 of 292 results for: MUSIC ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

MUSIC 24A: Ear Training I

Class is closed by design. Please contact instructor Erika Arul (mailto:earul@stanford.edu) for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-2

MUSIC 24B: Ear Training II

Class is closed by design. Please contact instructor Erika Arul (mailto:earul@stanford.edu) for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2

MUSIC 24C: Ear Training III

Class is closed by design. Please contact instructor Erika Arul (mailto:earul@stanford.edu) for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2

MUSIC 25: Decoding Anime

Anime as an artistic form often boasts highly imaginative graphics, striking music, vibrant characters, and fantastical stories. The course aims at decoding the expressive power of anime by applying a method of multimedia analysis that focuses on the interaction between its component elements: story, image, sound and music. Through close reading of works by five leading and innovative directors the students will develop tools to analyze anime and interpret it in a larger cultural context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

MUSIC 31N: Behind the Big Drums: Exploring Taiko (ASNAMST 31N)

Preference to Freshman. Since 1992 generations of Stanford students have heard, seen, and felt the power of taiko, big Japanese drums, at Admit Weekend, NSO, or at Baccalaureate. This seminar provides students with the opportunity to get behind the big drums, literally and academically. In fact, taiko is a relative newcomer to the American music scene. The contemporary ensemble drumming form, or kumidaiko, developed in Japan in the 1950s. The first North American taiko groups emerged from the Japanese American community shortly after and coincided with increased Asian American activism. In the intervening years, taiko has spread rapidly into other communities, most surprisingly to the UK, Europe, Australia, and South America. What drives the power of these drums? In this course, we explore the musical, cultural, historical, and political perspectives of taiko through readings and discussion, by playing the drums, workshopping with taiko masters, and meeting members of the taiko community. With North American taiko as the focal point, we learn about Japanese music and Japanese American history, and explore relations between performance, cultural expression, community, and identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

MUSIC 33N: Beethoven

This seminar is designed as an in-depth introduction to the music of Ludwig van Beethoven. In addition to exploring the composer's principal works in a variety of genres (symphonies, piano sonatas, string quartets, opera, etc.), we will consider broader questions of biography and reception history. How have images of the composer and the fortunes of his music changed over time? How did his compositions come to define the paradigm of Western classical music? What impact has he had on popular culture? The class is open to all levels of musical expertise; the ability to read music is not a requirement. Come prepared to discover -- or rediscover -- some great music!
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Hinton, S. (PI)

MUSIC 34N: Performing America: The Broadway Musical

Musical theater as a site for the construction of American identity in the twentieth century to the present. Issues of class, race, gender, and sexuality; intersections with jazz, rock, and pop; roles of lyricist, composer, director, choreographer, producer, performers. Individual shows (Showboat, Oklahoma, South Pacific, Guys and Dolls, West Side Story, Wicked, Book of Mormon, Hamilton, Dear Evan Hansen), show tunes in jazz performance, film musicals, and television. Opportunities for performance and attendance at local productions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Grey, T. (PI)

MUSIC 36H: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, ETHICSOC 36X, FRENCH 36, HISTORY 3D, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, SLAVIC 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as race, progress, and equality have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like gender identity, universal basic income, and historical memory play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Anderson, R. (PI)

MUSIC 40: Music History to 1600

Pre- or corequisite: 21.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

MUSIC 41: Music History 1600-1830

Pre- or corequisite: 22.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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