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131 - 140 of 370 results for: MUSIC

MUSIC 146J: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Listening to the Local: Music Ethnography of the Bay Area (ANTHRO 146J, CSRE 146J, MUSIC 246J)

An introduction to music ethnography through student research on musical life in the Bay Area. Focus is on the intersections of music, social life, and cultural practice by engaging with people as they perform music and culture in situ. Techniques taught include participant-observation, interviewing and oral history, writing field-notes, recording, transcription, analysis, and ethnographic writing. Pre-/co-requisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 146K: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Music of South Asia (MUSIC 246K)

Focuses on the history, theory, and practice of South Asian music with particular emphasis on the classical traditions of North and South India. Also addresses regional folk, popular, and devotional musical styles of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Topics include: raga, tala, vocal and instrumental genres, improvisation, aesthetics, music transmission, musical nationalism, social organization of musicians, music and ritual, music and gender, and technology. Lecture with discussion, some singing (no experience necessary), guest performances, reading, listening, and analysis. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 or 5 units only.)
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 146L: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Musics of Africa and the African Diaspora (AFRICAAM 146L, AFRICAST 246L, MUSIC 246L)

An introduction to musics of Africa and the African Diaspora. Topics include: music and nationalism, religion, embodiment, diaspora, migration, resistance, gender, globalization, and race. Musical regions and nations may include: Zimbabwe, South Africa, West Africa, Central Africa, Somalia, Ethiopia, the Caribbean, and the United States. This is a seminar-based course in which students will write short reflective papers and a final, research-based paper.Pre- or co-requisite for WIM credit: Music 22. WIM at 4 or 5 letter-graded units only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 147J: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: The Soul Tradition in African American Music (AFRICAAM 19, AMSTUD 147J, CSRE 147J, MUSIC 247J)

The African American tradition of soul music from its origins in blues, gospel, and jazz to its influence on today's r&b, hip hop, and dance music. Style such as rhythm and blues, Motown, Southern soul, funk, Philadelphia soul, disco, Chicago house, Detroit techno, trip hop, and neo-soul. Soul's cultural influence and global reach; its interaction with politics, gender, place, technology, and the economy. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 147K: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: Music and Urban Film (MUSIC 247K)

How music and sound work in urban cinema. What happens when music's capacity to transform everyday reality combines with the realism of urban films? Provides an introduction to traditional theories of film music and film sound; considers how new technologies and practices have changed the roles of music in film. Readings discuss film music, realistic cinema, urban musical practices and urban culture. Viewing includes action/adventure, Hindi film, documentary, film noir, hip hop film, the musical, and borderline cases by Jean-Luc Godard, Spike Lee, Wong Kar-Wai and Tsai Ming-Liang. Pre- or corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 unit level only.)
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 147L: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: Latin American Music and Globalization (CHILATST 147L, CSRE 147L, MUSIC 247L)

Focuses on vernacular music of Latin America and the Caribbean, including Mexico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Peru, Brazil, Colombia, and Argentina. Musical examples discussed in relation to: globalization, migration, colonialism, nationalism, diaspora, indigeneity, politics, religion, dance, ethnicity, and gender. How music reflects and shapes cultures, identities, and social structures. Genres addressed: bachata, bossa nova, cumbia, forro, ranchero, reggaeton, rock, salsa, tango, and others. Seminar, guest performances, reading, listening, and analysis. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)

MUSIC 148J: Studies in Perf Practice: Reactions to the Record: Early Recordings, Lost Styles, and Music's Future (MUSIC 248J)

This is a seminar on the transformation of musical style in the era of recordings in light of their roots in cultural trends, including shifting hierarchies between composer and performer, work and notation, text and act. Early recordings will be studied as documents of musical values and conceptions different from those around us today. Methodologies of performance analysis will be explored and used to contextualize sources, which include historic recordings from Stanford's Archive of Recorded Sound, performance documents, and field research with performers, composers, critics, and listeners. Repertoire includes works for orchestra, piano, strings, chamber ensemble and voice. Outstanding contributions from seminar members may be featured in the Music Department¿s May 2014 Reactions to the Record symposium. May be repeated for credit. Pre- or corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 150: Musical Acoustics

The physics of vibrating systems, waves, and wave motion. Time- and frequency-domain analysis of sound. Room acoustics, reverberation, and spatialization. The acoustics of musical instruments: voice, strings, and winds. Emphasis is on the practical aspects of acoustics in making music. Hands-on and computer-based lab. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/150/.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

MUSIC 150D: The Paradigm Shift (POLISCI 133D)

Examination of the idea of 'paradigm shift' by considering paradigm shifts in different academic fields of inquiry. Serial accumulation of guest lectures by distinguished faculty representing the University's many and varied departments, each asking and answering the question 'What is the most important paradigm shift in the history of my field? Are paradigm shifts revolution or evolution? Do they move us closer to truth? How frequently do they occur? Can humans plan for, cause, or resist them?

MUSIC 150P: The Changing World of Popular Music (ARTSINST 150)

This course will cover changes in the business, economics, and practices of the popular music industry. It will provide a brief historical overview of the industry and its business models. The majority of the course will focus on the industry as it works today and on forces that are causing it to change rapidly. The course will feature guest artists and executives with current experience in the field, as well as project-based assignments designed to give students hands-on experience.Topics will include: Economics and business models of commercial music business,Technology and music production, Technology and music distribution, Technology and marketing, Leadership in the music industry: case studies, Managing creative projects, Copyright and legal issues. Attendance at first class required. Enrollment will be determined on the first day through a simple application process.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: LeBoeuf, J. (PI)
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