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121 - 130 of 343 results for: MUSIC

MUSIC 144M: Robert Schumann and the Interpretation of Musical Romanticism (MUSIC 244M)

The creative personality, compositions, and writings of Robert Schumann (1810-1856) as exemplars of musical Romanticism in early nineteenth century European culture. Musical "interpretation" explored through a writing focus and a performance focus. Weekly writing assignments interpret compositions as texts, performances, and cultural documents. Students study and interpret up to three works (solo piano, chamber music, art-songs) by Schumann and/or contemporary figures (Schubert, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Brahms, Clara Schumann) for in-class presentation and final lecture-recital. Prerequisites: Music 42, and Music 22 or equivalent (intermediate music theory), intermediate or higher performance ability in piano, strings, or voice. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Grey, T. (PI)

MUSIC 145K: Studies in Western Art Music Since 1900: Concepts of New Music (MUSIC 245K)

A survey of the history of Western classical music in the twentieth century, concentrating on shifts in the concept of New Music in the first half of the century. The aim is twofold: to study in depth a representative selection of works and to develop a historiographical framework for that study. Relevant concepts to be examined include Expressionism, Neo-Classicism, New Objectivity, Serialism, Aleatoricism, and Minimalism -- all of them key terms used by music historians and critics to describe and delineate the multifaceted phenomenon of "New Music." Composers to be studied include Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Berg, Weill, Shostakovich, Reich and Glass, and others. Prerequisites: MUSIC 23, MUSIC 42. (WIM course for Music majors.)
Last offered: Autumn 2018

MUSIC 146M: New Keywords in African Sound (AFRICAAM 146D, AFRICAST 146M, CSRE 146D, MUSIC 246M)

This course identifies and considers new keywords for the study of contemporary African music and sound. Each week we will foster discussion around a keyword and a constellation of case studies. The sonic practices we will encounter range from South African house music to Ghanaian honk horns; from Congolese rumba bands to Tunisian trance singers; from listening to the radio in a Tanzanian homestead to making hip hop music videos on the Kenyan coast. By exploring the unexpected interconnections between contemporary African musical communities, we will discuss new keywords arising in current scholarship, including technologies like the amplifier and the hard drive, spaces like the studio and the city, and analytics like pleasure and hotness. We will also engage with established concepts for the study of postcolonial African cultures, including nationalism, cosmopolitanism, globalization, diaspora, and Pan-Africanism. This is a seminar-based course open to graduate students, upper level undergraduate students, and other students with consent of the instructor. Proficiency in music is not required. WIM at 4 units only.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

MUSIC 146N: Transcultural Perspectives of South-East Asian Music and Arts (COMPLIT 148, COMPLIT 267, FRENCH 260A, MUSIC 246N)

This course will explore the links between aspects of South-East Asian cultures and their influence on modern and contemporary Western art and literature, particularly in France; examples of this influence include Claude Debussy (Gamelan music), Jacques Charpentier (Karnatak music), Auguste Rodin (Khmer art) and Antonin Artaud (Balinese theater). In the course of these interdisciplinary analyses - focalized on music and dance but not limited to it - we will confront key notions in relation to transculturality: orientalism, appropriation, auto-ethnography, nostalgia, exoticism and cosmopolitanism. We will also consider transculturality interior to contemporary creation, through the work of contemporary composers such as Tran Kim Ng¿c, Chinary Ung and Tôn-Thât Tiêt. Viewings of sculptures, marionette theater, ballet, opera and cinema will also play an integral role. To be eligible for WAYS credit, this course must be taken for 3 units and a letter grade; WIM credit in Music at 4 units and a letter grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Kretz, H. (PI)

MUSIC 147J: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: The Soul Tradition in African American Music (AFRICAAM 19, AMSTUD 147J, CSRE 147J, MUSIC 247J)

The African American tradition of soul music from its origins in blues, gospel, and jazz to its influence on today's r&b, hip hop, and dance music. Style such as rhythm and blues, Motown, Southern soul, funk, Philadelphia soul, disco, Chicago house, Detroit techno, trip hop, and neo-soul. Soul's cultural influence and global reach; its interaction with politics, gender, place, technology, and the economy. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 147K: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: Music and Urban Film (CSRE 147D, MUSIC 247K)

How music and sound work in urban cinema. What happens when music's capacity to transform everyday reality combines with the realism of urban films? Provides an introduction to traditional theories of film music and film sound; considers how new technologies and practices have changed the roles of music in film. Readings discuss film music, realistic cinema, urban musical practices and urban culture. Viewing includes action/adventure, Hindi film, documentary, film noir, hip hop film, the musical, and borderline cases by Jean-Luc Godard, Spike Lee, Wong Kar-Wai and Tsai Ming-Liang. Pre- or corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 unit level only.)
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 150P: The Changing World of Popular Music (ARTSINST 150)

This course will cover changes in the business, economics, and practices of the popular music industry. It will provide a brief historical overview of the industry and its business models. The majority of the course will focus on the industry as it works today and on forces that are causing it to change rapidly. The course will feature guest artists and executives with current experience in the field, as well as project-based assignments designed to give students hands-on experience.Topics will include: Economics and business models of commercial music business,Technology and music production, Technology and music distribution, Technology and marketing, Leadership in the music industry: case studies, Managing creative projects, Copyright and legal issues. To secure your spot in the course, enroll in Axess and attend the first class session.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: LeBoeuf, J. (PI)

MUSIC 151B: Red Vest Band

A small ensemble of the Leland Stanford Junior University Marching Band open to members of the LSJUMB by audition and consent of instructor. Members perform at multiple Stanford Athletics events, multiple community events, and travel to some away and post-season games. Weekly rehearsals focus on introduction of new student arrangements and the LSJUMB's repertoire of rock, funk, and traditional styles. May be repeated for credit a total of 12 times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Gavin, R. (PI)

MUSIC 153: Online Jamming and Concert Technology (ARTSINST 141)

Today's vast amount of streaming and video conferencing on the Internet lacks one aspect of musical fun and that's what this course is about: high-quality, near-synchronous musical collaboration. Under the right conditions, the Internet can be used for ultra-low-latency, uncompressed sound transmission. The course teaches open-source (free) techniques for setting up city-to-city studio-to-studio audio links. Distributed rehearsing, production and split ensemble concerts are the goal. Setting up such links and debugging them requires knowledge of network protocols, network audio issues and some ear training.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 154A: Sound Art I (ARTSTUDI 131)

Acoustic, digital and analog approaches to sound art. Familiarization with techniques of listening, recording, digital processing and production. Required listening and readings in the history and contemporary practice of sound art. (lower level)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE
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