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51 - 60 of 205 results for: MS

MS&E 111X: Introduction to Optimization (Accelerated) (ENGR 62X, MS&E 211X)

Optimization theory and modeling. The role of prices, duality, optimality conditions, and algorithms in finding and recognizing solutions. Perspectives: problem formulation, analytical theory, computational methods, and recent applications in engineering, finance, and economics. Theories: finite dimensional derivatives, convexity, optimality, duality, and sensitivity. Methods: simplex and interior-point, gradient, Newton, and barrier. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

MS&E 112: Mathematical Programming and Combinatorial Optimization (MS&E 212)

Combinatorial and mathematical programming (integer and non-linear) techniques for optimization. Topics: linear program duality and LP solvers; integer programming; combinatorial optimization problems on networks including minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, and network flows; matching and assignment problems; dynamic programming; linear approximations to convex programs; NP-completeness. Hands-on exercises. Prerequisites: basic concepts in linear algebra, probability theory, CS 106A or X.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

MS&E 120: Introduction to Probability

Probability is the foundation behind many important disciplines including statistics, machine learning, risk analysis, stochastic modeling and optimization. This course provides an in-depth undergraduate-level introduction to fundamental ideas and tools of probability. Topics include: the foundations (sample spaces, random variables, probability distributions, conditioning, independence, expectation, variance), a systematic study of the most important univariate and multivariate distributions (Normal, Multivariate Normal, Binomial, Poisson, etc...), as well as a peek at some limit theorems (basic law of large numbers and central limit theorem) and, time permitting, some elementary markov chain theory. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR

MS&E 121: Introduction to Stochastic Modeling

Stochastic processes and models in operations research. Discrete and continuous time parameter Markov chains. Queuing theory, inventory theory, simulation. Prerequisite: 120, 125, or equivalents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Blanchet, J. (PI)

MS&E 125: Introduction to Applied Statistics

An increasing amount of data is now generated in a variety of disciplines, ranging from finance and economics, to the natural and social sciences. Making use of this information, however, requires both statistical tools and an understanding of how the substantive scientific questions should drive the analysis. In this hands-on course, we learn to explore and analyze real-world datasets. We cover techniques for summarizing and describing data, methods for statistical inference, and principles for effectively communicating results. Prerequisite: 120, CS 106A, or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

MS&E 130: Information Networks and Services

Architecture of the Internet and performance engineering of computer systems and networks. Switching, routing and shortest path algorithms. Congestion management and queueing networks. Peer-to-peer networking. Wireless and mobile networking. Information service engineering and management. Search engines and recommendation systems. Reputation systems and social networking technologies. Security and trust. Information markets. Select special topics and case studies. Prerequisites: 111, 120, and CS 106A.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

MS&E 135: Networks

This course provides an introduction to how networks underly our social, technological, and natural worlds, with an emphasis on developing intuitions for broadly applicable concepts in network analysis. The course will include: an introduction to graph theory and graph concepts; social networks; information networks; the aggregate behavior of markets and crowds; network dynamics; information diffusion; the implications of popular concepts such as "six degrees of separation", the "friendship paradox", and the "wisdom of crowds".
Terms: Win | Units: 3

MS&E 140: Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs (MS&E 240)

Non-majors and minors who have taken or are taking elementary accounting should not enroll. Introduction to accounting concepts and the operating characteristics of accounting systems. The principles of financial and cost accounting, design of accounting systems, techniques of analysis, and cost control. Interpretation and use of accounting information for decision making. Designed for the user of accounting information and not as an introduction to a professional accounting career. Enrollment limited. Admission by order of enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-4

MS&E 145: Introduction to Finance and Investment

Introduction to modern quantitative finance and investments. The course focuses on the basic principles underlying financial decision making which are applicable to all forms of investment: stocks, bonds, real estate, corporate finance, etc., and how they are applied in practice. Topics: interest rates; evaluating investments: present value and internal rate of return; fixed-income markets: bonds, yield, duration, portfolio immunization; term structure of interest rates; measuring risk: volatility, value at risk, conditional value at risk; designing optimal security portfolios; the capital asset pricing model, arbitrage pricing theory. Group projects involving financial market data. No prior knowledge of finance required. Prerequisite: basic preparation in probability, statistics, and optimization.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

MS&E 146: Corporate Financial Management (MS&E 249)

Key functions of finance in both large and small companies, and the core concepts and key analytic tools that provide their foundation. Making financing decisions, evaluating investments, and managing cashflow, profitability and risk. Designing performance metrics to effectively measure and align the activities of functional groups and individuals within the firm. Structuring relationships with key customers, partners and suppliers. Prerequisite: 145, 245A, or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
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