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21 - 30 of 204 results for: MS

ENERGY 146: Reservoir Characterization and Flow Modeling with Outcrop Data (ENERGY 246, GEOLSCI 246)

Course gives an overview of concepts from geology and geophysics relevant for building subsurface reservoir models. Includes a required 1-day field trip and hands-on lab exercises. Target audience: MS and 1st year PhD students in PE/ERE/GS with little or no background in geology or geophysics. Topics include: basin and petroleum systems, depositional settings, deformation and diagenesis, introduction to reflection seismic data, rock and fluid property measurements, geostatistics, and flow in porous media.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ENERGY 246: Reservoir Characterization and Flow Modeling with Outcrop Data (ENERGY 146, GEOLSCI 246)

Course gives an overview of concepts from geology and geophysics relevant for building subsurface reservoir models. Includes a required 1-day field trip and hands-on lab exercises. Target audience: MS and 1st year PhD students in PE/ERE/GS with little or no background in geology or geophysics. Topics include: basin and petroleum systems, depositional settings, deformation and diagenesis, introduction to reflection seismic data, rock and fluid property measurements, geostatistics, and flow in porous media.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ENGR 140A: Leadership of Technology Ventures

First of three-part sequence for students selected to the Mayfield Fellows Program. Management and leadership within high technology startups, focusing on entrepreneurial skills related to product and market strategy, venture financing and cash flow management, team recruiting and organizational development, and the challenges of managing growth and handling adversity in emerging ventures. Other engineering faculty, founders, and venture capitalists participate as appropriate. Recommended: accounting or finance course (MS&E 140, ECON 90, or ENGR 60).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Byers, T. (PI)

GEOLSCI 246: Reservoir Characterization and Flow Modeling with Outcrop Data (ENERGY 146, ENERGY 246)

Course gives an overview of concepts from geology and geophysics relevant for building subsurface reservoir models. Includes a required 1-day field trip and hands-on lab exercises. Target audience: MS and 1st year PhD students in PE/ERE/GS with little or no background in geology or geophysics. Topics include: basin and petroleum systems, depositional settings, deformation and diagenesis, introduction to reflection seismic data, rock and fluid property measurements, geostatistics, and flow in porous media.

GEOLSCI 287: Fundamentals of Mass Spectrometry

This course explains ion creation, mass separation, and ion detection in mass spectrometry methods commonly used in the Earth Sciences. Gas source (C-O-H-S stable isotope, 40Ar/39Ar, and (U-Th)-He), secondary ionization (SIMS), laser ablation and solution-based mass inductively coupled (ICP-MS) and thermal ionization (TIMS) mass spectrometry techniques are also explored. Additional topics include ion optics, vacuum generation, and pressure measurement, instrument calibration, data reduction, and error propagation methods.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

HRP 201A: Health Policy Graduate Student Tutorial I (MED 215A)

Seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy PhD students and all MS Health Policy students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study. 2 unit registration requires written responses to assigned reading questions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2

HRP 201B: Health Policy Graduate Student Tutorial II (MED 215B)

Second in a three-quarter seminar series, the core tutorial is for first-year Health Policy PhD students and all MS Health Policy students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Mello, M. (PI)

HRP 201C: Health Policy Graduate Student Tutorial III (MED 215C)

Third in a three-quarter seminar series, the core tutorial is for first-year Health Policy PhD students and all MS Health Policy students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2

INTLPOL 340: Technology, Innovation and Modern War: Keeping America's Edge in an Era of Great Power Competition (MS&E 296)

This course explores how technology advances in areas like Cyber, Space, AI, Machine Learning, and Autonomy will create new types of military systems that will be deployed in modern conflicts, and the new operational concepts, organization and strategies that will emerge from these technologies. The course develops an appreciation that innovation in military systems throughout history has followed a repeatable pattern: technology innovation > new weapons > experimentation with new weapons/operational concepts > pushback from incumbents > first use of new operational concepts. Students will apply course concepts and learning to identify opportunities for the U.S. to maintain its technological edge and compete more effectively in this era of great power rivalry. The course builds on concepts presented in MS&E 193/293: Technology and National Security and provides a strong foundation for MS&E 297: Hacking for Defense.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

LAW 807I: Policy Practicum: Tools for Reentry: Practices, Apps, and Services

Client: Various government agencies and nonprofit groups. Formerly incarcerated individuals face a range of personal and institutional challenges in their reentry into broader society. Considerable research and many programs have focused on systems reform and support and social programs to increase the likelihood of successful reentry. But technological tools also have the potential to help lower friction and increase the success of reentry. This policy lab will engage with challenging legal, social, government systems, and technological questions, with opportunities to design and/or implement new tools to aid in the reentry process. We will work with a variety of stakeholders including government organizations and programs, non-profit entities, and legal innovators to prototype and evaluate new technological solutions to facilitate the reentry process and reduce recidivism. This practicum will build a collaborative team of diverse backgrounds and skill sets to learn from each other an more »
Client: Various government agencies and nonprofit groups. Formerly incarcerated individuals face a range of personal and institutional challenges in their reentry into broader society. Considerable research and many programs have focused on systems reform and support and social programs to increase the likelihood of successful reentry. But technological tools also have the potential to help lower friction and increase the success of reentry. This policy lab will engage with challenging legal, social, government systems, and technological questions, with opportunities to design and/or implement new tools to aid in the reentry process. We will work with a variety of stakeholders including government organizations and programs, non-profit entities, and legal innovators to prototype and evaluate new technological solutions to facilitate the reentry process and reduce recidivism. This practicum will build a collaborative team of diverse backgrounds and skill sets to learn from each other and enhance the overall capacity of the research and tool development. We encourage students who are interested in criminal justice, technology for social impact, access to justice, and entrepreneurship and innovation for social good to join us, including upper-division and graduate students from Law, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, MS&E, Public Policy, and the social sciences. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final PROJECT. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Winter 2020
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