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121 - 130 of 204 results for: MS

MS&E 280: Organizational Behavior: Evidence in Action

Organization theory; concepts and functions of management; behavior of the individual, work group, and organization. Emphasis is on cases and related discussion. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

MS&E 284: Designing Modern Work Organizations

This practice-based experiential lab course is geared toward MS&E masters students. Students will master the concepts of organizational design, with an emphasis on applying them to modern challenges (technology, growth, globalization, and the modern workforce). Students will also gain mastery of skills necessary for success in today's workplace (working in teams, communicating verbally, presenting project work). Guest speakers from industry will present real-world challenges related to class concepts. Students will complete a quarter-long project designing and managing an actual online organization.
Last offered: Winter 2018

MS&E 292: Health Policy Modeling

Primarily for master's students; also open to undergraduates and doctoral students. The application of mathematical, statistical, economic, and systems models to problems in health policy. Areas include: disease screening, prevention, and treatment; assessment of new technologies; bioterrorism response; and drug control policies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

MS&E 293: Technology and National Security: Past, Present, and Future (INTLPOL 256, MS&E 193)

Explores the relation between technology, war, and national security policy from early history to modern day, focusing on current U.S. national security challenges and the role that technology plays in shaping our understanding and response to these challenges. Topics include the interplay between technology and modes of warfare; dominant and emerging technologies such as nuclear weapons, cyber, sensors, stealth, and biological; security challenges to the U.S.; and the U.S. response and adaptation to new technologies of military significance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

MS&E 296: Technology, Innovation and Modern War: Keeping America's Edge in an Era of Great Power Competition (INTLPOL 340)

This course explores how technology advances in areas like Cyber, Space, AI, Machine Learning, and Autonomy will create new types of military systems that will be deployed in modern conflicts, and the new operational concepts, organization and strategies that will emerge from these technologies. The course develops an appreciation that innovation in military systems throughout history has followed a repeatable pattern: technology innovation > new weapons > experimentation with new weapons/operational concepts > pushback from incumbents > first use of new operational concepts. Students will apply course concepts and learning to identify opportunities for the U.S. to maintain its technological edge and compete more effectively in this era of great power rivalry. The course builds on concepts presented in MS&E 193/293: Technology and National Security and provides a strong foundation for MS&E 297: Hacking for Defense.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

MS&E 297: "Hacking for Defense": Solving National Security issues with the Lean Launchpad

In a crisis, national security initiatives move at the speed of a startup yet in peacetime they default to decades-long acquisition and procurement cycles. Startups operate with continual speed and urgency 24/7. Over the last few years they've learned how to be not only fast, but extremely efficient with resources and time using lean startup methodologies. In this class student teams will take actual national security problems and learn how to apply lean startup principles, ("business model canvas," "customer development," and "agile engineering) to discover and validate customer needs and to continually build iterative prototypes to test whether they understood the problem and solution. Teams take a hands-on approach requiring close engagement with actual military, Department of Defense and other government agency end-users. Team applications required in February, see hacking4defense.stanford.edu. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

MS&E 301: Dissertation Research

Prerequisite: doctoral candidacy.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

MS&E 302: Fundamental Concepts in Management Science and Engineering

Each course session will be devoted to a specific MS&E PhD research area. Advanced students will make presentations designed for first-year doctoral students regardless of area. The presentations will be devoted to: illuminating how people in the area being explored that day think about and approach problems, and illustrating what can and cannot be done when addressing problems by deploying the knowledge, perspectives, and skills acquired by those who specialize in the area in question. Area faculty will attend and participate. During the last two weeks of the quarter groups of first year students will make presentations on how they would approach a problem drawing on two or more of the perspectives to which they have been exposed earlier in the class. Attendance is mandatory and performance will be assessed on the basis of the quality of the students¿ presentations and class participation. Restricted to first year MS&E PhD students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

MS&E 310: Linear Programming

Formulation of standard linear programming models. Theory of polyhedral convex sets, linear inequalities, alternative theorems, and duality. Variants of the simplex method and the state of art interior-point algorithms. Sensitivity analyses, economic interpretations, and primal-dual methods. Relaxations of harder optimization problems and recent convex conic linear programs. Applications include game equilibrium facility location. Prerequisite: MATH 113 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

MS&E 311: Optimization (CME 307)

Applications, theories, and algorithms for finite-dimensional linear and nonlinear optimization problems with continuous variables. Elements of convex analysis, first- and second-order optimality conditions, sensitivity and duality. Algorithms for unconstrained optimization, and linearly and nonlinearly constrained problems. Modern applications in communication, game theory, auction, and economics. Prerequisites: MATH 113, 115, or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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