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1 - 10 of 47 results for: MGTECON

MGTECON 200: Managerial Economics

MGTECON 200 is a base-level course in microeconomics. It covers microeconomic concepts relevant to management, including the economics of relationships, pricing decisions, perfect competition and the "invisible hand," risk aversion and risk sharing, and moral hazard and adverse selection.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

MGTECON 203: Managerial Economics - Accelerated

MGTECON 203 uses the same math as 200 (derivatives and algebra, and not much more) but uses it more often. Previous economics is not necessary, but it does help to be comfortable with simple mathematical models. The business world has become more quantitative and economics-oriented in the last 30 years, but many of the key ideas in economics, relating to topics such as pricing, monopoly, imperfect competition, game theory, moral hazard and adverse selection, public choice, externalities, risk aversion, capital market pricing and equilibrium, and auction theory can all be usefully approached with this relatively small amount of math. The key is for students to develop the small number of intellectual tools that enables one to analyze a wide variety of economic problems.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Bulow, J. (PI)

MGTECON 209: MSx: Microeconomics

This course is an introduction to Microeconomics, focusing on concepts and topics relevant to managerial decision making. Topics include the economics of relationships (reciprocity, reputation, credibility, and transaction-cost economics), maximization via marginal analysis, price discrimination, double-marginalization and distribution channels, perfect competition and the case (such as it is) for competitive markets, externalities, choice under uncertainty, risk sharing and spreading, adverse selection and signaling, and moral hazard and incentives. No prior Economics background is required but students who have not had courses in this area (or not had one in a very long time) may want to "review" at the level of a high-school advanced placement course. Required math background includes ability to solve linear and quadratic equations in one unknown, to solve two simultaneous linear equations, basic differential calculus, ability to work with Excel spreadsheets. It is desirable that students are familiar with the Solver add-on to Excel.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Kreps, D. (PI)

MGTECON 300: Growth and Stabilization in the Global Economy

This course gives students the background they need to understand the broad movements in the global economy. Key topics include long-run economic growth, technological change, wage inequality, international trade, interest rates, inflation, exchange rates, and monetary policy. By the end of the course, students should be able to read and understand the discussions of economic issues in The Economist, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, or the Congressional Budget Office.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

MGTECON 327: Business and Public Policy Perspectives on U.S. Inequality

This class will analyze the growth in inequality in the US over the last several decades and how that trend is likely to continue or change in the future. We will ask if and how public policy can affect inequality. We will also focus on business's role -- what are the responsibilities of private sector companies, how does inequality affect them, and how should the growth in inequality affect their strategies? We will look at inequality in income, some of its potential sources, and its effects in other areas. Specifically, we will look at education, housing, the social safety net, migration, and the job market. The class will be very interactive and will be based on readings drawn from academic research, case studies, news, and opinion readings. We will also have guest speakers from industry, government, and non-profits. The class will be co-taught by a GSB labor economist and an advisor to policy makers with decades of business experience.nnLOGISTICAL NOTE: The class will not meet on M more »
This class will analyze the growth in inequality in the US over the last several decades and how that trend is likely to continue or change in the future. We will ask if and how public policy can affect inequality. We will also focus on business's role -- what are the responsibilities of private sector companies, how does inequality affect them, and how should the growth in inequality affect their strategies? We will look at inequality in income, some of its potential sources, and its effects in other areas. Specifically, we will look at education, housing, the social safety net, migration, and the job market. The class will be very interactive and will be based on readings drawn from academic research, case studies, news, and opinion readings. We will also have guest speakers from industry, government, and non-profits. The class will be co-taught by a GSB labor economist and an advisor to policy makers with decades of business experience.nnLOGISTICAL NOTE: The class will not meet on May 23 or May 25. Instead, there will be a mandatory, all-day class field trip to explore inequality issues in depth and in person on Wednesday, May 24. If you have an academic-related reason you cannot make the trip, we will assign alternative work. However, the trip is required unless you have a conflicting class or academic obligation.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

MGTECON 331: Health Law: Finance and Insurance

This course provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the US. Potential topics include: health reform, health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), medical malpractice and quality regulation, pharmaceuticals, the corporate practice of medicine, regulation of fraud and abuse, and international comparisons.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

MGTECON 343: The Evolution of Finance

This course provides a framework to understand how uncertainty and technology affect the evolution of finance (and businesses generally), and its illustration with heavy emphasis on recent developments and future trends. In recent years Myron Scholes has given about half the lectures with the other half given by prominent guests. The guest list changes year to year but 2016's list included David Booth, Howard Marks, Martin Chavez, James Manyika, Kevin Warsh, Tom Kempner, and Larry Summers.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

MGTECON 349: Smart Pricing and Market Design

This course is an Advanced Applications option in the Economics menu. The focus of the course is on pricing mechanisms and the design of marketplaces. The pricing component of the course will handle both traditional topics, such as price differentiation, and more modern ones, such as dynamic pricing. In the market design component of the course, we will consider such topics as auctions (e.g., designing auctions for selling online advertising slots) and matching (e.g., designing mechanisms for matching students to schools).
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

MGTECON 381: Contemporary Economic Policy

Economic issues permeate all that happens in government. This topics-based course will exam a variety of historic and current issues on the political agenda where economics is central to decision making. It is taught by faculty who served at the White House in either the Clinton or George W. Bush Administration.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

MGTECON 383: Measuring Impact in Practice

This class will provide students practical skills for measuring impact in business and social enterprise, with a principal focus on evaluating, conducting, and analyzing experiments and quasi-experiments. How large is the impact of raising prices on sales? Is an advertising campaign working? Does a non-profit actually improve people's lives? Students will finish the course with the ability to design, analyze, and skeptically evaluate experiments that can rigorously answer questions like these. Students will learn: how to evaluate claims of causality; how to conduct and analyze experiments and quasi-experiments; the advantages and disadvantages of experiments; how to quantify uncertainty; and what can go wrong in experiments. Students will acquire a conceptual understanding of basic experimental statistics to inform these skills. Students will also be exposed to how leading companies, researchers, and social innovators strategically deploy experiments. Finally, students will conduct their own experiments on a topic of their choosing in small groups. The class will not assume any prior statistical or mathematical training. Completing short problem sets will require acquiring basic knowledge of R.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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