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11 - 20 of 36 results for: MED

MED 221: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 121)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 224: Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health (HRP 224, PUBLPOL 224)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health is a Collaboratory workshop for students/fellows to design/develop innovative social ventures/solutions addressing key challenges in public health and the environment, in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030). SE Lab is open to students/fellows across Stanford and combines design thinking exercises, short lectures & case studies, workshops, small group teamwork, presentations, guest speakers, and faculty, practitioner and peer feedback to support/advance development of your ideas/plans. Join SE Lab with an idea or simply the desire to join a team. Enrollment limited to 30.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Bloom, G. (PI)

MED 230SI: Perspectives on Cancer

Cancer consumes the lives of those associated with it: patients and their loved ones, their medical staff, and often the larger community. This course will address the broad impact of cancer from multiple fronts (medical, social, mental, etc.) by providing perspectives beyond the cut-and-dry scientific issue that the disease is often made out to be, enabling students to explore the "human-side" to the disease. In alternating weeks, students will participate in a Socratic seminar based on light reading about relevant topics and personally interact with guest speakers, who may include medical professional, cancer survivors and their loved ones, and activists. This course will meet weeks 2-9.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 233: Global Health: Beyond Diseases and International Organizations

Provides multidisciplinary trainees insight into over-arching themes of global health. Topics include systemic issues affecting healthcare progress globally, ethical and thoughtful approaches to solving these issues, as well as economics, water sanitation, public health, organizations in global health, human rights, involvement in NGOs, ethics of overseas work, and other non-medical aspects of this subject. This course will cover some of the essentials of patient care while working in the field as well including child health care, malaria, TB, and HIV. Course only open to graduate and MD/MSPA students. Undergraduates are not eligible to enroll.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 238: Leading and Managing Health Care Organizations: Innovation and Collaboration in High Stakes Settings

Same as OB 348. Leading and managing in complex, high stakes settings, like health care, where lives and livelihoods are on the line, presents distinctive challenges and constraints. This course challenges you to apply seminal and contemporary theories in organizational behavior to evaluate managerial decisions and develop evidence-based strategies for leading and managing health care teams and organizations. Topics include leading systems that promote learning; implementing change; and interdisciplinary problem-solving, decision-making, and collaboration. Group work and exercises will simulate high pressure and risk-taking under uncertainty. While the focus of this course will be on health care situations, lessons are relevant to other settings including consulting, banking, and high tech, and prior experience in the health sector is not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 241: Clinical Skills for Patient Care in Free Clinics

Enrollment in this course is by application only for advanced volunteers at the Cardinal Free Clinics. Focus is on preparing students to gain early clinical experience by teaching basic skills such as taking patient histories, working with interpreters, providing motivational interviewing, and presenting cases to medical students or physicians. Students learn through classroom lectures and practice sessions. Upon successful completion of a competency assessment, students are able to serve in a clinic role in the Cardinal Free Clinics. Prerequisite: Advanced standing as a volunteer at the Cardinal Free Clinics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 248: Student Rounds

Teams of preclinical students meet weekly with a clinical student to hear the history and physical of a recent case the clinical student encountered on the wards. Following the presentation, the preclinical students work together under the guidance of the clinical student to develop a problem list and plan, which are then compared with the problem list, plan, and orders made by the actual admitting team. In the course of presenting the cases, the clinical student describes personal experiences and practical components of ward work and daily clinical routine.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 249: Topics in Health Economics I (ECON 249, HRP 249)

Course will cover various topics in health economics, from theoretical and empirical perspectives. Topics will include public financing and public policy in health care and health insurance; demand and supply of health insurance and healthcare; physicians' incentives; patient decision-making; competition policy in healthcare markets, intellectual property in the context of pharmaceutical drugs and medical technology; other aspects of interaction between public and private sectors in healthcare and health insurance markets. Key emphasis on recent work and empirical methods and modelling. Prerequisites: Micro and Econometrics first year sequences (or equivalent). Curricular prerequisites (if applicable): First year graduate Microeconomics and Econometrics sequences (or equivalent)
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 252: Outcomes Analysis (BIOMEDIN 251, HRP 252)

Methods of conducting empirical studies which use large existing medical, survey, and other databases to ask both clinical and policy questions. Econometric and statistical models used to conduct medical outcomes research. How research is conducted on medical and health economics questions when a randomized trial is impossible. Problem sets emphasize hands-on data analysis and application of methods, including re-analyses of well-known studies. Prerequisites: one or more courses in probability, and statistics or biostatistics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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