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21 - 30 of 73 results for: MED ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

MED 271: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (BIOE 371)

This course ( BIOE371, MED271) exposes students to the challenges and opportunities of developing and implementing innovative health technologies to help patients around the world. Non-communicable diseases, such as metabolic and chronic respiratory disease, now account for 7 in 10 deaths worldwide, creating the need for innovative health technologies that work across diverse global markets. At the beginning of the quarter, the course will provide an overview of the dynamic global health technology industry. Next, faculty members, guest experts, and students will discuss key differences and similarities when commercializing new products in the for-profit health technology sector across six important regions: the US and Europe, China and Japan, and India and Brazil. Finally, the course will explore critical ¿global health¿ issues that transcend international borders and how technology can be leveraged to address them. This section will culminate with an interactive debate focused on whether for-profit, nonprofit, or hybrid models are best for implementing sustainable global health solutions. The last class will be devoted to synthesis, reflection, and a discussion of career opportunities in the global health technology field.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

MED 273: Biodesign for Digital Health (BIOE 273)

Health care is facing significant cross-industry challenges and opportunities created by a number of factors including: the increasing need for improved access to affordable, high-quality care; growing demand from consumers for greater control of their health and health data; the shift in focus from sick care to prevention and health optimization; aging demographics and the increased burden of chronic conditions; and new emphasis on real-world, measurable health outcomes for individuals and populations. Moreover, the delivery of health information and services is no longer tied to traditional brick and mortar hospitals and clinics: it has increasingly become "mobile," enabled by apps, sensors, wearables; simultaneously, it has been augmented and often revolutionized by emerging digital and information technologies, as well as by the data that these technologies generate. This multifactorial transformation presents opportunities for innovation across the entire cycle of care, from welln more »
Health care is facing significant cross-industry challenges and opportunities created by a number of factors including: the increasing need for improved access to affordable, high-quality care; growing demand from consumers for greater control of their health and health data; the shift in focus from sick care to prevention and health optimization; aging demographics and the increased burden of chronic conditions; and new emphasis on real-world, measurable health outcomes for individuals and populations. Moreover, the delivery of health information and services is no longer tied to traditional brick and mortar hospitals and clinics: it has increasingly become "mobile," enabled by apps, sensors, wearables; simultaneously, it has been augmented and often revolutionized by emerging digital and information technologies, as well as by the data that these technologies generate. This multifactorial transformation presents opportunities for innovation across the entire cycle of care, from wellness, to acute and chronic diseases, to care at the end of life. But how does one approach innovation in digital health to address these health care challenges while ensuring the greatest chance of success? At Stanford Biodesign, we believe that innovation is a process that can be learned, practiced, and perfected; and, it starts with a need. In Biodesign for Digital Health, students will learn about digital health and the Biodesign needs-driven innovation process from over 50 industry experts. Over the course of ten weeks, these speakers join the teaching team in a dynamic classroom environment that includes lectures, panel discussions, and breakout sessions. These experts represent startups, corporations, venture capital firms, accelerators, research labs, health organizations, and more. Student teams will take actual digital and mobile health challenges and learn how to apply Biodesign innovation principles to research and evaluate needs, ideate solutions, and objectively assess them against key criteria for satisfying the needs. Teams take a hands-on approach with the support of need coaches and mentors. On the final day of class, teams present to a panel of digital health experts and compete for project extension funding. Friday section will be used for team projects and for scheduled workshops. Limited enrollment for this course. Students need to submit their application online via: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_28ZWIF8RJsyMvCR
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

MED 277: AI-Assisted Care (CS 337)

AI has been advancing quickly, with its impact everywhere. In healthcare, innovation in AI could help transforming of our healthcare system. This course offers a diverse set of research projects focusing on cutting edge computer vision and machine learning technologies to solve some of healthcare's most important problems. The teaching team and teaching assistants will work closely with students on research projects in this area. Research projects include Care for Senior at Senior Home, Surgical Quality Analysis, AI Assisted Parenting, Burn Analysis & Assessment and more. AI areas include Video Understanding, Image Classification, Object Detection, Segmentation, Action Recognition, Deep Learning, Reinforcement Learning, HCI and more. The course is open to students in both school of medicine and school of engineering.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1

MED 278: Stanford Health Consulting Group- Leadership

This course is application-based and will be composed of students who have taken ¿Stanford Health Consulting Group - Core¿ and who wish to take on leadership roles in organizing and managing the high-impact health care projects for the class, which address major strategic and operational challenges in health care delivery and innovation. Participants will select projects, define objectives and deliverables, manage teams of 4-8 students from the core class, and ultimately serve as a bridge between students, faculty sponsors, and other health care stakeholders. Enrollment requires permission from the Instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

MED 279: Stanford Heath Consulting Group - Core

This course provides the opportunity to analyze and solve major strategic and operational challenges in health care delivery and innovation through interdisciplinary team projects. Teams will receive direct mentorship from Stanford Medicine faculty, health care leaders, and experienced student leads, with projects carefully defined to optimize high-impact experiential learning and leadership development. Projects will culminate with student-led presentations to faculty sponsors and other health care stakeholders, as well as opportunities for further dissemination of solutions.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

MED 282: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 182)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 285: Global Leaders and Innovators in Human and Planetary Health (HRP 285)

Are you interested in innovative ideas and strategies for addressing urgent challenges in human and planetary health? This lecture series features a selection of noteworthy leaders, innovators and experts across diverse sectors such as: healthcare/medical innovation, foundations/venture capital, biotechnology/pharmaceuticals, social innovation/entrepreneurship health, tech/media and artificial intelligence (AI), human rights, global poverty/development, sustainable agriculture/hunger/nutrition. Co-convened by faculty, fellows and students collaborating across several Stanford centers, the course invites the discussion of global problems, perspectives and solutions in the fields of health and the environment. Light Dinner will be served. Students from all backgrounds are encouraged to enroll - registration open to all Stanford students and fellows. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2

MED 286: Health Information Technology and Strategy

Health Information technology was intended to help reduce and cost and improve the quality of health care services. TO date, this is little evidence that this goal has been achieved. This course is designed to explore economic frameworks that can help us to understand how health IT can achieve it's intended goals. These frameworks build from general business and economic models used successfully in other industries. The course will be utilize both business cases and lecture to prepare students to propose potential novel applications of health information technology solutions. Each student will have a team-based final project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Schulman, K. (PI)

MED 289: Introduction to Bioengineering Research (BIOE 390)

Preference to medical and bioengineering graduate students with first preference given to Bioengineering Scholarly Concentration medical students. Bioengineering is an interdisciplinary field that leverages the disciplines of biology, medicine, and engineering to understand living systems, and engineer biological systems and improve engineering designs and human and environmental health. Students and faculty make presentations during the course. Students expected to make presentations, complete a short paper, read selected articles, and take quizzes on the material.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 290: Independent Study with Presence and the Program in Bedside Medicine

Students work with their faculty mentor on projects and studies that are broadly centered around the vision and mission of Presence: The Art and Science of Human Connection and the Program in Bedside Medicine. Please see our websites for updated projects and initiatives - Presence + Program in Bedside Medicine. Currently, we focus on: How do we teach and emphasize to students, residents, physicians (and beyond) in the medical field the need to master bedside skills? How does bedside medicine affect patient care? How has patient care changed with the omnipresence of technology in our lives? How is bedside medicine going to change in the next few decades, centuries? In investigating these questions, students utilize scientific articles and data, engage patients, and collaborate with our faculty and staff. Independent study projects culminate in a presentation to our team, with the potential for posters or manuscripts. Students paired with faculty based on their area of interest and facul more »
Students work with their faculty mentor on projects and studies that are broadly centered around the vision and mission of Presence: The Art and Science of Human Connection and the Program in Bedside Medicine. Please see our websites for updated projects and initiatives - Presence + Program in Bedside Medicine. Currently, we focus on: How do we teach and emphasize to students, residents, physicians (and beyond) in the medical field the need to master bedside skills? How does bedside medicine affect patient care? How has patient care changed with the omnipresence of technology in our lives? How is bedside medicine going to change in the next few decades, centuries? In investigating these questions, students utilize scientific articles and data, engage patients, and collaborate with our faculty and staff. Independent study projects culminate in a presentation to our team, with the potential for posters or manuscripts. Students paired with faculty based on their area of interest and faculty/project needs.We emphasize the human connection with patients, and students are encouraged to engage patients within our program for teaching sessions, research studies, among other projects. Enrollment varies with and is limited to faculty need. Repeatable for credit; more than one-quarter of commitment expected.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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