2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 3 of 3 results for: ME103D

ME 52SI: Scan, Model, Print! Designing with 3D Technology

Think 3D scanning, modeling, and printing technology is just about plastic widgets? Think again! Immerse yourself in a world of custom prosthetics, manufacturing in space, autonomous cars, and much more. This hands-on engineering design course teaches advanced 3D imaging and computational modeling skills in order to leverage the unique benefits of additive manufacturing to solve complex problems. Students will connect the theory behind these tools to direct experience with the equipment and software. Short assignments at the start of the quarter will build students' core competencies and prepare them for a team-based, open-ended project. Class time will be a mixture of lecture, lab, guest speakers, and field trips. Recommended: basic CAD, fabrication, and programming experience (e.g. ME103D, 203, CS106A or equivalents).
Last offered: Spring 2015

ME 103D: Engineering Drawing and Design

Designed to accompany 203. The fundamentals of engineering drawing including orthographic projection, dimensioning, sectioning, exploded and auxiliary views, assembly drawings, and SolidWorks. Homework drawings are of parts fabricated by the student in the lab. Assignments in 203 supported by material in 103D and sequenced on the assumption that the student is enrolled in both courses simultaneously.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1

ME 181: Deliverables: A Mechanical Engineering Design Practicum

The goal of this course is to enable students to solve industry design challenges using modern mechanical design methods. Each week a new practical skill is introduced. These skills have been identified by recently graduated Stanford engineers as being critical to their work. Students then build their command of each skill by completing a simplified yet representative project and submitting deliverables similar to those required in industry. For example, students will learn about how to properly design parts with O-rings and then will be required to design a water-tight enclosure and submit CAD, mechanical drawings, and a bill of materials. Several of the classes feature recent Stanford graduates as guest lecturers. In addition to teaching applicable skills from their job and providing examples from industry, these engineers will also expose students to the range of responsibilities and daily activities that makeup professional mechanical design work. Prerequisites: ME203, ME103d and ME112 OR consent of instructor. Enrollment limited, students complete application on first day of class
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints