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11 - 20 of 40 results for: ME 1: Introduction to Mechanical Engineering

ME 133: Intermediate Fluid Mechanics

This course expands on the introduction to fluid mechanics provided by ME70. Topics include the conservation equations and finite volume approaches to flow quantification; engineering applications of the Navier-Stokes equations for viscous fluid flows; flow instability and transition to turbulence, and basic concepts in turbulent flows, including Reynolds averaging; boundary layers, including the governing equations, the integral method, thermal transport, and boundary layer separation; fundamentals of computational fluid dynamics (CFD); basic ideas of one-dimensional compressible flows.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Lele, S. (PI)

ME 151: Introduction to Computational Mechanics

In modern engineering design of structural systems, computer analysis is often used at every stage, from initial prototyping through final design. This course will introduce students to computational modeling and prototyping applied to solids and structures. The course reviews the basic theory of linear solid mechanics, introduces the finite element method for numerical modeling of mechanics-based problems, and provides practical experience in computer modeling using a commercial finite element code.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit

ME 171E: Aerial Robot Design (AA 248E, ME 271E)

(Graduate students only enroll in ME 271e or AA 248e) A result-focused introduction to the design of winged aerial robots capable of vertical takeoff and landing for a wide range of applications. Students will learn how to ideate specific aerial robot applications and make an appropriate design from scratch that meets mission requirements. Design skill outcomes include: robot need identification based on mission requirements; system ideation and sizing; making design performance tradeoffs; aerodynamic wing design; CAD assembly; communicating the design and its application. The hands-on lab experience includes prototyping the aerial robot mission, to inform system design, by building and flying quadcopters. Prerequisites: intro level undergraduate fluid mechanics or aerodynamics (e.g. ME 70 or AA 100) or equivalent; Intro level undergraduate electronics or Arduino experience; MATLAB experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Lentink, D. (PI)

ME 210: Introduction to Mechatronics (EE 118)

Technologies involved in mechatronics (intelligent electro-mechanical systems), and techniques to apply this technology to mecatronic system design. Topics include: electronics (A/D, D/A converters, op-amps, filters, power devices); software program design, event-driven programming; hardware and DC stepper motors, solenoids, and robust sensing. Large, open-ended team project. Prerequisites: ENGR 40, CS 106, or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

ME 215C: Analytical Product Design (APD)

Analytical design experience for consumer product. Integration of models of engineering function, manufacturing costs, and market conditions. Introduction to modeling micro economics, market models, and consumer surveying as applied in product design. Introduction to consumer product cost modeling. Draw from other coursework to build engineering function model. Student teams build and link these models in an optimization framework to maximize profitability. Build prototypes for engineering function and form expression.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ME 216M: Introduction to the Design of Smart Products (CS 377N)

This course will focus on the technical mechatronic skills as well as the human factors and interaction design considerations required for the design of smart products and devices. Students will learn techniques for rapid prototyping of smart devices, best practices for physical interaction design, fundamentals of affordances and signifiers, and interaction across networked devices. Students will be introduced to design guidelines for integrating electrical components such as PCBs into mechanical assemblies and consider the physical form of devices, not just as enclosures but also as a central component of the smart product. Prerequisites include: CS106A and E40 highly recommended, or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Follmer, S. (PI)

ME 220: Introduction to Sensors

Sensors are widely used in scientific research and as an integral part of commercial products and automated systems. The basic principles for sensing displacement, force, pressure, acceleration, temperature, optical radiation, nuclear radiation, and other physical parameters. Performance, cost, and operating requirements of available sensors. Elementary electronic circuits which are typically used with sensors. Lecture demonstration of a representative sensor from each category elucidates operating principles and typical performance. Lab experiments with off-the-shelf devices. Recommended Pre-requisites or equivalent knowledge: Physics 43 electromagnetism, Physics 41 mechanics, Math 53 Taylor series approximation, 2nd order Ordinary Diff Eqns, ENGR40A/Engr40 or ME210, i.e. some exposure to building basic circuits
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

ME 234: Introduction to Neuromechanics

Understanding the role of mechanics in brain development, physiology, and pathology. Mechanics of brain cells: neurons, mechanobiology, mechanotransduction. Mechanics of brain tissue: experimental testing, constitutive modeling, computational modeling. Mechanics of brain development: gyrification, cortical folding, axon elongation, lissencephaly, polymicrogyria. Mechanics of traumatic brain injury: high impact loading, neural injury. Mechanics of brain tumors, brain cancer, tumor growth, altered cytoskeletal mechanics. Mechanics of neurological disorders: autism, dementia, schizophrenia. Mechanics of brain surgery.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ME 265: Technology Licensing and Commercialization

Course focuses on how to bridge the gap between creation and commercialization with new ideas, inventions, and technology (not limited to mechanical engineering). Comprehensive introduction to patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets. Covers business strategies and legal aspects of determining what can be owned and licensed, how to determine commercial value, and what agreements and other paperwork is necessary. Discussion includes aspects of Contract and Intellectual Property law as well as provisions of license agreements, NDAs, and their negotiation. All materials provided including many sample documents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Hustein, J. (PI)

ME 271E: Aerial Robot Design (AA 248E, ME 171E)

(Graduate students only enroll in ME 271e or AA 248e) A result-focused introduction to the design of winged aerial robots capable of vertical takeoff and landing for a wide range of applications. Students will learn how to ideate specific aerial robot applications and make an appropriate design from scratch that meets mission requirements. Design skill outcomes include: robot need identification based on mission requirements; system ideation and sizing; making design performance tradeoffs; aerodynamic wing design; CAD assembly; communicating the design and its application. The hands-on lab experience includes prototyping the aerial robot mission, to inform system design, by building and flying quadcopters. Prerequisites: intro level undergraduate fluid mechanics or aerodynamics (e.g. ME 70 or AA 100) or equivalent; Intro level undergraduate electronics or Arduino experience; MATLAB experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Lentink, D. (PI)
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