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1 - 10 of 28 results for: LINGUIST

LINGUIST 1: Introduction to Linguistics

The cognitive organization of linguistic structure and the social nature of language use. Why language learning is difficult. Why computers have trouble understanding human languages. How languages differ from one another. How and why speakers of the same language speak differently. How language is used strategically. *** Sections are mandatory. Please sign up for one of the sections at enrollment
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 47N: Languages, Dialects, Speakers

Preference to freshmen. Variation and change in languages from around the world; the roots, historical development, and linguistic and social structures of variation; how languages differ from one another and how issues in linguistics connect to other social and cultural issues; the systematic study of language.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Anttila, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 90: Teaching Spoken English

Practical approach to teaching English to non-native speakers. Teaching principles and the features of English which present difficulties. Preparation of lessons, practice teaching in class, and tutoring of non-native speaker.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Geda, K. (PI)

LINGUIST 105: Phonetics (LINGUIST 205A)

The study of speech sounds: how to produce them, how to perceive them, and their acoustic properties. The influence of production and perception systems on sound change and phonological patterns. Acoustic analysis and experimental techniques. Lab exercises. Prerequisite: 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 130B: Introduction to Lexical Semantics

Introduction to basic concepts and issues in the linguistic study of word meaning. The course focuses on the core semantic properties and internal organization of the four major word classes in natural languages: nouns, adjectives, prepositions, verbs. This course draws on material from English and other languages to illustrate the range of word meanings found across languages and to investigate possible word meanings. Prerequisites: Linguist 1 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. Linguist 130A is not a prerequisite for this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 163A: Endangered Languages and Language Revitalization (ANTHRO 163A, ANTHRO 263A, LINGUIST 263, NATIVEAM 163)

Languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. This course looks at how and why languages die, and what is lost from a culture when that occurs. We will investigate how this trend can be reversed by methods of language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, multimodal fieldwork, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. We will focus on a number of current programs around the world to revitalize languages. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered language communities, and the possibilities of successful collaborations and capacity building, focusing especially on Northern California Indian peoples and their languages.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ogilvie, S. (PI)

LINGUIST 188: Natural Language Understanding (CS 224U, LINGUIST 288)

Project-oriented class focused on developing systems and algorithms for robust machine understanding of human language. Draws on theoretical concepts from linguistics, natural language processing, and machine learning. Topics include lexical semantics, distributed representations of meaning, relation extraction, semantic parsing, sentiment analysis, and dialogue agents, with special lectures on developing projects, presenting research results, and making connections with industry. Prerequisites: one of LINGUIST 180, CS 124, CS 224N, CS224S, or CS221; and logical/semantics such as LINGUIST 130A or B, CS 157, or PHIL150
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 200: Foundations of Linguistic Theory

Theories that have shaped contemporary linguistics; recurrent themes and descriptive practice. Strong background in Linguistics or permission of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 205A: Phonetics (LINGUIST 105)

The study of speech sounds: how to produce them, how to perceive them, and their acoustic properties. The influence of production and perception systems on sound change and phonological patterns. Acoustic analysis and experimental techniques. Lab exercises. Prerequisite: 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 222B: Foundations of Syntactic Theory II

The nature of unbounded dependency constructions and their treatment in modern grammatical theories. Filler-gap dependencies, island constraints, and the relation between grammar and processing. Prerequisite: 222A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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