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1 - 10 of 36 results for: LINGUIST ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LINGUIST 1: Introduction to Linguistics

This course introduces students to the cognitive organization of linguistic structure and the social nature of language use. We will investigate language as it is used in our everyday lives, highlighting both the variability and systematic nature of all levels of linguistic structure. In doing so, we will discover how to approach language from a scientific perspective, learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis, and understand the foundational concepts of the field of Linguistics. Sample topics to be explored across a variety of languages include language and advertising, language change, dialect variation, and language and technology. *** Sections are mandatory. Please sign up for one of the sections at enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 10N: Experimental Phonetics

Everyday, we face variation in language. As readers, we see words printed in different fonts, sizes, and typefaces, typically static on a page. As listeners, we hear a speech signal riddled with variation. We are exposed to words, but a single word is produced differently each time it is uttered. These words stream by listeners at a rate of about 5 syllables per second, further complicating the listeners' task. How listeners map a speech signal into meaning despite massive variation is an issue central to linguistic theory. The field of experimental phonetics investigates how listeners take words that often vary drastically and understand them as quickly and adeptly as they do. This class introduces students to acoustic and auditory phonetics. As a class, we will carry out a project in experimental phonetics aimed at understanding how different realizations of words are able to be understood by listeners. Throughout the course, students will read background literature, become familiar with the Stanford Linguistics Lab, and learn to use software integral to the design, data collection, and data analysis of experiments. Each week, we will have two meetings,one in a seminar setting and one in the lab.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

LINGUIST 47N: Languages, Dialects, Speakers

Preference to freshmen. Variation and change in languages from around the world; language and thought; variation in sound patterns and grammatical structures; linguistic and social structures of variation; how languages differ from one another and how issues in linguistics connect to other social and cultural issues; the systematic study of language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Anttila, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 83N: Translation

Preference to Freshman. What is a translation? The increased need for translations in the modern world due to factors such as tourism and terrorism, localization and globalization, diplomacy and treaties, law and religion, and literature and science. How to meet this need; different kinds of translation for different purposes; what makes one translation better than another; why some texts are more difficult to translate than others. Can some of this work be done by machines? Are there things that cannot be said in some languages?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Kay, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 110: Introduction to Phonology

Introduction to the sound systems of the world's languages, their similarities and differences. Theories that account for the tacit generalizations that govern the sound patterns of languages.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 120: Introduction to Syntax

Grammatical constructions, primarily English, and their consequences for a general theory of language. Practical experience in forming and testing linguistic hypotheses, reading, and constructing rules.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 131: Language and Thought (PSYCH 131, PSYCH 262)

The psychology of language including: production and understanding in utterances; from speech sounds to speaker's meaning; children's acquisition of the first language; and the psychological basis for language systems. Language functions in natural contexts and their relation to the processes by which language is produced, understood, and acquired. Prerequisite: 1 or LINGUIST 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 134A: The Structure of Discourse: Theory and Applications (LINGUIST 234)

In this course we will address the structure of language above the sentence concentrating initially on: nn(1) defining the minimal units of discourse structuren(2) recursive rules of combination of minimal units (i.e. discourse ¿syntax¿)n(3) representations of discourse level phenomenan(4) the nature and structure of spoken and written formal and informal discourse genres and Speech events in English and other languages including stories, explanations, literary works etc. on the one hand, and socially constructed occasions of speaking such as classes, doctor patient interactions, and informal conversation on the other.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4

LINGUIST 140: Language Acquisition I (LINGUIST 240)

Processes of language acquisition in early childhood; stages in development; theoretical issues and research questions. Practical experience in data collection. Satisfies the WIM requirement for Linguistics if requested.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

LINGUIST 144: Minds and Machines (PHIL 99, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 100)

An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR
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