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LAW 922A: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Practice

The Youth and Education Advocacy Clinic offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or strategic policy research and consulting. All students will have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with coalitions and/or other education-sector agencies to advance equity-minded educational policies and school reform. Students working on special education matters will have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area will interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational resear more »
The Youth and Education Advocacy Clinic offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or strategic policy research and consulting. All students will have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with coalitions and/or other education-sector agencies to advance equity-minded educational policies and school reform. Students working on special education matters will have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area will interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work will offer students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters will interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. Students may also have the opportunity to participate in complex school reform litigation, including the monitoring and enforcement of a consent decree and corrective action plan in an ongoing special education lawsuit or appellate and trial work in a pathbreaking educational rights case on behalf of Native American students. Finally, students who are interested in strategic policy research and management consulting on behalf of public education institutional clients (school districts, charter schools, state education agencies) will have the opportunity to participate in the multi-disciplinary collaborations with non-profit clients. The education clinic includes a one-week intensive training program held at the beginning of the quarter, weekly seminars that focus on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a many opportunities for feedback and reflection with the instructors. Admission is by consent of instructor. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses -- The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. -- Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. -- Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. -- The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. -- Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. --The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. -- For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. -- Cross listed with the School of Education. -- Elements used in grading: Projects and class participation. (Cross-listed with EDUCATION 334 A,B,C).
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 922B: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Methods

The Youth and Education Advocacy Clinic offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or strategic policy research and consulting. All students will have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with coalitions and/or other education-sector agencies to advance equity-minded educational policies and school reform. Students working on special education matters will have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area will interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational resear more »
The Youth and Education Advocacy Clinic offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or strategic policy research and consulting. All students will have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with coalitions and/or other education-sector agencies to advance equity-minded educational policies and school reform. Students working on special education matters will have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area will interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work will offer students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters will interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. Students may also have the opportunity to participate in complex school reform litigation, including the monitoring and enforcement of a consent decree and corrective action plan in an ongoing special education lawsuit or appellate and trial work in a pathbreaking educational rights case on behalf of Native American students. Finally, students who are interested in strategic policy research and management consulting on behalf of public education institutional clients (school districts, charter schools, state education agencies) will have the opportunity to participate in the multi-disciplinary collaborations with non-profit clients. The education clinic includes a one-week intensive training program held at the beginning of the quarter, weekly seminars that focus on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a many opportunities for feedback and reflection with the instructors. Admission is by consent of instructor. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses -- The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. -- Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. -- Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. -- The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. -- Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. --The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. -- For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. -- Cross listed with the School of Education. -- Elements used in grading: Projects and class participation. (Cross-listed with EDUCATION 334 A,B,C).
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 922C: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Coursework

The Youth and Education Advocacy Clinic offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or strategic policy research and consulting. All students will have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with coalitions and/or other education-sector agencies to advance equity-minded educational policies and school reform. Students working on special education matters will have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area will interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational resear more »
The Youth and Education Advocacy Clinic offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or strategic policy research and consulting. All students will have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with coalitions and/or other education-sector agencies to advance equity-minded educational policies and school reform. Students working on special education matters will have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area will interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work will offer students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters will interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. Students may also have the opportunity to participate in complex school reform litigation, including the monitoring and enforcement of a consent decree and corrective action plan in an ongoing special education lawsuit or appellate and trial work in a pathbreaking educational rights case on behalf of Native American students. Finally, students who are interested in strategic policy research and management consulting on behalf of public education institutional clients (school districts, charter schools, state education agencies) will have the opportunity to participate in the multi-disciplinary collaborations with non-profit clients. The education clinic includes a one-week intensive training program held at the beginning of the quarter, weekly seminars that focus on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a many opportunities for feedback and reflection with the instructors. Admission is by consent of instructor. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses -- The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. -- Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. -- Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. -- The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. -- Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. --The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. -- For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. -- Cross listed with the School of Education. -- Elements used in grading: Projects and class participation. (Cross-listed with EDUCATION 334 A,B,C).
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 1001: Antitrust

Antitrust law sets the ground rules for competition. This course will explore the basic concepts in antitrust law. We will examine cartels and competitor collaborations, monopolization, vertical restraints and horizontal mergers. There are no prerequisites for this course. No economic background is required. The course is open to GSB students and graduate students in the Economics Department. To apply for this course, non-Law students must complete a Non-Law Student Add Request Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Non-Law Students). Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and final exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

LAW 1002: Advanced Antitrust: Monopolization and Abuse of Dominance in the US and the EU

This course will take an in-depth look at the principles in US and EU competition law regarding conduct by firms that excludes or weakens rivals. This is perhaps the most controversial and unsettled part of competition law and the part about which there is the least multinational agreement. We will study, among other materials, some of the major recent cases in which the same or very similar matters were addressed by both US and EU competition authorities, including matters involving Microsoft, Google, Intel and Rambus. The objectives are to gain a deeper understanding of the principles regarding exclusionary conduct and the ways in which those principles in US and EU law differ and, from that understanding, to draw inferences about the reasons for the differences between US and the EU law and the impact of different enforcement procedures on substantive legal principles. This course is open to anyone who has taken Antitrust Law 1001 or an equivalent course about EU or EU-like competition law and to others with the permission of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final paper.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

LAW 1003: Bankruptcy

This course concerns the law and finance of corporate bankruptcy with an emphasis on reorganization. The course reviews the fundamentals of debt contracting, including the role of events of default, debt priority, and security interests. The course examines various aspects of the bankruptcy process: including the automatic stay, the avoidance of prebankruptcy transactions (e.g. fraudulent conveyances and preferences), the treatment of executory contracts, the debtor's governance structure during bankruptcy, the financing of operations and investments in bankruptcy, sales of assets during bankruptcy, and the process of negotiating, voting, and ultimately confirming a plan of reorganization. Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section 01 (final exam) into section 02 (final paper), with consent of the instructor. Elements use in grading: Class participation; and exam or paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Triantis, G. (PI)

LAW 1004: Comparative Corporate Law and Governance

From the United States to China, and from Brazil to the EU, corporate capitalism has triumphed globally as the dominant form of economic organization. Yet despite the common attributes of the corporation familiar to every U.S. law student, corporations around the world have diverse ownership structures, interact in their domestic political economies in different ways, and exhibit a host of traits that vary with the institutional context in which they operate. This seminar explores the many forms corporate capitalism takes around the world, the forces that shape domestic corporate law and governance in major countries, and the important legal and policy issues raised by global corporate activity. We will explore the rise of "agency capitalism" in the U.S. and the proliferation of new forms of corporate ownership around the world, the emergence of Chinese state capitalism and its legal and policy consequences, efforts to reform Japanese stakeholder-oriented capitalism, and the emergence more »
From the United States to China, and from Brazil to the EU, corporate capitalism has triumphed globally as the dominant form of economic organization. Yet despite the common attributes of the corporation familiar to every U.S. law student, corporations around the world have diverse ownership structures, interact in their domestic political economies in different ways, and exhibit a host of traits that vary with the institutional context in which they operate. This seminar explores the many forms corporate capitalism takes around the world, the forces that shape domestic corporate law and governance in major countries, and the important legal and policy issues raised by global corporate activity. We will explore the rise of "agency capitalism" in the U.S. and the proliferation of new forms of corporate ownership around the world, the emergence of Chinese state capitalism and its legal and policy consequences, efforts to reform Japanese stakeholder-oriented capitalism, and the emergence of hybrid forms of business organization designed to pursue both profits and social benefits. Policy issues to be considered include the "social responsibility" or "purpose" of the corporation, the national security implications of foreign investment by state-owned enterprises, and the consequences of global hedge fund activism. Special Instructions: This class is limited to 15 law students by lottery. Depending on demand, additional students may be admitted with consent of the instructor. Interested students not admitted through the lottery process are encouraged to contact the instructor about the possibility of enrollment. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Presentation.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 1005: Comparative Venture Capital - China

(Formerly Law 736) This course is taught in conjunction with Law 1006. Students may enroll for this course alone or for both this course and Law 1006. Law 1005 is intended to introduce students to the legal and financial principles underlying venture capital investment in start-up enterprises and innovative technologies. A special emphasis of this course will be a comparative analysis of the ways in which the various legal and financial structures employed by venture capitalists are replicated in other legal environments, with a focus on the largest venture capital and IPO market in the world - China. The first eight weeks of the course will coincide with the first eight weeks of Winter Quarter, and will be conducted at Stanford Law School. Class sessions will be comprised of lectures regarding the basic concepts and structures, as well as seminar discussions with venture capital industry participants. Elements used in grading: Final exam, attendance and class participation. Special Instructions: Enrollment in the Beijing option is limited to 12 students (See Law 1006 for application instructions and deadline).
Last offered: Winter 2018

LAW 1006: Comparative Venture Capital - China: Field Study

(Formerly Law 736A) This is the Stanford Center at Peking University in Beijing component of Comparative Venture Capital - China ( Law 1005). For details, see course description for Law 1006. During spring break 2017, the course will be held at the Stanford Center at Peking University in Beijing, and will consist of meetings and seminars with lawyers, entrepreneurs, and venture capitalists active in the Chinese venture capital market. Students will also tour start-up enterprises made possible with venture investments. Enrollment is limited to 12 students. PLEASE NOTE: Students will need a passport and a visa to travel to Beijing. Elements used in grading: class participation and short writing assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Winter 2018

LAW 1007: Contracts: American Law

This course will provide advanced-degree students with coverage of Contracts law comparable to the fall course offered for first-year JD students. The course will identify the scope and purpose of the legal protection accorded to interests created by voluntary undertakings. We will focus on problems of contract formation, enforceability, interpretation, performance and excuses for non-performance, and remedies for breach. Not open to JD students. Open only to students in the SLS Advanced Degree Programs. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, paper, final exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
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