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451 - 460 of 460 results for: LAW

LAW 8001: Corporate Governance and Practice Seminar

The seminar on corporate governance meets in the Autumn and Winter quarters and forms the core of the LL.M. Program in Corporate Governance & Practice. The course, designed to be taken in conjunction with Corporations in Autumn, takes an economic approach to the analysis of corporate law. In particular, we ask why American corporate law has its particular structure. We will seek to understand how the separation of ownership and control produces agency costs, and the ways in which corporate law seeks to remedy these through techniques like disclosure, fiduciary duties and shareholder litigation, voting, and hostile takeovers. We will read and discuss ongoing debates among scholars and practitioners about the agency cost framework, the merits and limits of current legal policies, and the role of institutional arrangements like activist shareholders. We will also consider the relevance of these disputes, and the effectiveness of corporate law and governance more generally, in the context more »
The seminar on corporate governance meets in the Autumn and Winter quarters and forms the core of the LL.M. Program in Corporate Governance & Practice. The course, designed to be taken in conjunction with Corporations in Autumn, takes an economic approach to the analysis of corporate law. In particular, we ask why American corporate law has its particular structure. We will seek to understand how the separation of ownership and control produces agency costs, and the ways in which corporate law seeks to remedy these through techniques like disclosure, fiduciary duties and shareholder litigation, voting, and hostile takeovers. We will read and discuss ongoing debates among scholars and practitioners about the agency cost framework, the merits and limits of current legal policies, and the role of institutional arrangements like activist shareholders. We will also consider the relevance of these disputes, and the effectiveness of corporate law and governance more generally, in the context of a variety of real-life incidents. No knowledge of economics is presupposed, so the course will also introduce basic economics and finance concepts necessary to understand these concepts. Some course sessions, largely in the Winter, will feature outside speakers who will complement the discussions with real-world examples drawn from practice. Attendance and active participation are important to the success of the seminar and an important factor in the overall grade. Students are expected to have carefully read and reviewed assigned materials in advance of each session. Students will be required to submit short reflection papers that evaluate, critique, and discuss some or all of the key topics reviewed in the previous week's session. Students may also be asked to prepare presentations to help guide discussions. The class will be graded H/P/R/F in Autumn Quarter and Winter Quarter. This course is required for and limited to students in the Corporate Governance and Practice LL.M. Program. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and assignments.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Jennings, A. (PI)

LAW 8002: Environmental Law and Policy Colloquium

The Environmental Law & Policy Colloquium offers students the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge legal topics related to environmental law, broadly defined to include, among other areas, pollution control, natural resources management, and energy development. The colloquium meets in two quarters. During the autumn quarter, students will learn about core concepts that underlie the administration of environmental law, exploring ideas from economics, philosophy, natural science, and law. In the autumn quarter, students will begin to develop a capstone research paper on a contemporary environmental law issue. During the spring quarter, the students will write and present their research papers. Elements used in grading include attendance and participation, problem sets, small writing assignments, and a final paper. This course is required for students in the Environmental Law & Policy LL.M. Program. All other students are welcome but will need instructor permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Polk, A. (PI)

LAW 8003: International Economic Law, Business & Policy (IELBP) Colloquium

This course enables IELBP advanced degree students to explore selected issues, case studies and policy debates in international economic law and business, global political economy, and international economic dispute resolution in a highly interactive seminar. The course is a complement to the other core degree requirements of the LLM in IELBP and is discussion-oriented. The course offers students the opportunity to engage in dialogue with experts in the field (including Stanford Law faculty and interdisciplinary scholars from other schools, departments or programs at Stanford University). The course takes on a wide-ranging approach: we will examine legal issues confronting international business while also focusing on cutting-edge debates arising out of economic globalization; we will explore the complex architecture of international economic law, unpacking how international institutions and public international law sources (formal and informal) regulate: i) cross-border business trans more »
This course enables IELBP advanced degree students to explore selected issues, case studies and policy debates in international economic law and business, global political economy, and international economic dispute resolution in a highly interactive seminar. The course is a complement to the other core degree requirements of the LLM in IELBP and is discussion-oriented. The course offers students the opportunity to engage in dialogue with experts in the field (including Stanford Law faculty and interdisciplinary scholars from other schools, departments or programs at Stanford University). The course takes on a wide-ranging approach: we will examine legal issues confronting international business while also focusing on cutting-edge debates arising out of economic globalization; we will explore the complex architecture of international economic law, unpacking how international institutions and public international law sources (formal and informal) regulate: i) cross-border business transactions between private parties, ii) international economic relations between and among states, and iii) cross-border economic conduct by states, international organizations, and private actors. Students are expected to have carefully read assigned materials in advance of each session, and to actively participate during class. Grades for the colloquium are based on students' papers and their classroom performance (e.g., preparation, participation, attendance, etc.). The course extends over two quarters (autumn and spring), and students are required to complete both quarters in order to satisfy the program requirement. Topics in the Fall quarter will focus on developments in world trade law, international monetary cooperation, international investment law, economic integration and development, international taxation, international arbitration, and international antitrust law. Topics in the Spring quarter will be selected based on students' interests, as well as pressing policy concerns in international commerce, such as climate change and national security.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 8004: Law, Science, and Technology Colloquium

The Law, Science & Technology Colloquium offers students in the Law, Science & Technology LLM Program the opportunity to discuss cutting-edge legal issues at the intersection of law and technology with leading experts in the field, including Stanford faculty, visiting scholars, technology and IP lawyers, entrepreneurs, and executives from Silicon Valley technology companies. For organizational purposes, the course is divided into units reflecting different areas of law and technology. Each begins with a keystone lecture that introduces students to the unit's doctrinal and theoretical themes. After the keystone lecture, each unit includes one or more topical lectures taught by experts representing a diverse cross-section of viewpoints from academia, legal practice, and business. Students are expected to have carefully read the assigned materials in advance of each session, and to actively participate during class. Students will also write papers dealing with the units' themes. Grades for the colloquium are based on students' papers and their classroom performance (e.g., preparation, participation, attendance, etc.). This course is restricted to students in the Law, Science, and Technology LLM program, and satisfies their "colloquium requirement" for the fall quarter.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Du Mont, J. (PI)

LAW 8011: SPILS Law and Society Seminar

This seminar is restricted to students who are in the SPILS program. The seminar deals with the relationship between legal systems and the societies in which they are embedded. The materials are drawn from studies of many different societies. Among the issues dealt with are: What influence does culture have on the operation of legal systems? What are the social forces which produce particular forms of law? What impact do legal interventions have on society and on human behavior? Elements used in grading: Exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 8012: SPILS Masters Thesis

The writing of a work of original scholarship in the area of research that each student chooses is necessary requirement of the JSM degree. During the winter quarter students are expected to submit two draft chapters: 1) any chapter of the fellow's choice in early February; and 2) a draft of the empirical research result's chapter in early March. During the spring quarter students are expected to finalize their research project, and write and submit their final thesis. Towards that end, students must complete and submit a draft of the whole thesis in early April. The final version, revised in response to the adviser's comments, must be submitted by the end of the quarter. The exact dates will be informed in advance by the teaching fellow. Elements used in grading: Thesis. This course is exclusive to SPILS students. The thesis is required for JSM graduation.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 8013: SPILS Research Methods Workshop

This is a mandatory course for SPILS Fellows as part of the program's core curriculum. Its main goal is to offer students an interdisciplinary perspective about socio-legal research, and research tools for implementing their individual research projects. This Winter term workshop will complement the Research Design for Empirical Legal Studies Seminar taken in the Autumn by 1) expanding and elaborating on some of the methods analyzed during the seminar; and 2) assisting students in using such methods towards their individual research project. The workshop will consist of specialized sessions, most of them tailored towards the work of empirical research that occurs after the data collection phase. During the quarter the fellows are expected to submit drafts of different chapters of their thesis and present their preliminary findings in class. If appropriate, the workshop may also include group and/or individual sessions designed to address the very specific needs of the research undertaken by the SPILS Fellows. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and final presentations. Enrollment is restricted to SPILS fellows. The seminar is required for JSM graduation.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Ravid, I. (PI)

LAW 8021: Introduction to American Law

This course is designed to introduce international students in the Exchange and Advanced Degree Programs (LL.M. and SPILS) to the key principles of American law. The course provides an overview of distinctive features of the U.S. legal system, including its history and institutions. Topics include the role of precedent in the common law, distinctive elements of civil procedure and legal actions, the branches of the U.S. government and the separation of powers, federalism, due process, and equal protection. The course is offered before the start of the regular Law School quarter. Special Instructions: Required for LL.M. but optional for the SPILS and Exchange Program students. Open to LL.M., SPILS and SLS Exchange Program students only. The class starts on August 27 and runs through September 18. Final exam will be scheduled on Friday, September 20. Elements used in grading: class attendance, participation, short written assignment, and final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Greely, H. (PI)

LAW 8022: Professional Responsibility

This course introduces students to the goals, rules and responsibilities of the American legal profession and its members. The course is designed around the premise that the subject of professional responsibility is the single most relevant to students' future careers as members of the bar. These issues come up on a constant basis and it is critical that lawyers be alert to spotting them when they arise and be educated in the methods of resolving them. As such, the course will address many of the most commonly recurring issues that arise, such as confidentiality, conflicts of interest, candor to the courts and others, the role of the attorney as counselor, the structure of the attorney-client relationship, issues around billing, the tension between "cause lawyering" and individual representation, and lawyers' duty to serve the underrepresented. In addition, we will delve into some more personal ethical issues that reflect on why students have chosen law as a profession and how lawyers more »
This course introduces students to the goals, rules and responsibilities of the American legal profession and its members. The course is designed around the premise that the subject of professional responsibility is the single most relevant to students' future careers as members of the bar. These issues come up on a constant basis and it is critical that lawyers be alert to spotting them when they arise and be educated in the methods of resolving them. As such, the course will address many of the most commonly recurring issues that arise, such as confidentiality, conflicts of interest, candor to the courts and others, the role of the attorney as counselor, the structure of the attorney-client relationship, issues around billing, the tension between "cause lawyering" and individual representation, and lawyers' duty to serve the underrepresented. In addition, we will delve into some more personal ethical issues that reflect on why students have chosen law as a profession and how lawyers compose careers that promote or frustrate those goals. At the start of each session (starting with the second session) there will be a brief quiz on the material that was covered in the readings and discussion of the prior session. During the period of the course, students will also be responsible for submitting one reflection paper (three-to-five pages) based on a prompt that will be circulated after each of the first six sessions (one paper for the entire course). These papers will be due by 11:59 on the last day the class meets. Grades will be based on the quizzes and the paper submitted, with the instructor retaining the right to take class participation into account. Attendance is mandatory and students must seek instructor approval for any absences not due to illness. This course is offered to international graduate students only. It is taught on an accelerated basis over the course of three weeks between orientation and the beginning of the Fall Quarter classes. Thus, the course meets on average nine hours per week. The exact meeting times will be set once the graduate students' schedules are set. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, quizzes and written memo. Limited to LLMs, JSMs and exchange students. Required for LLMs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Marshall, L. (PI)

LAW 8031: JSD Research Colloquium

Required for and limited to JSD candidates. The objective of the colloquium is to assist students in designing, conducting, analyzing and reporting their doctoral dissertation research. Weekly colloquium sessions are devoted to work in progress presentations by JSD candidates, supplemented by occasional guest lectures and discussions of cross-cutting issues of interest to doctoral students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0
Instructors: Kessler, A. (PI)
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