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431 - 440 of 460 results for: LAW

LAW 7820: Moot Court

The major moot court activity at Stanford Law School is the Marion Rice Kirkwood Memorial Competition, which takes place each year during Autumn and Winter terms. Autumn term will be dedicated to brief writing and completion of the written portion of the Competition; the oral argument portion of the Competition will be conducted during the first four to five weeks of Winter term. Students on externship and in clinics may enroll, if permitted by their respective programs. In Autumn term there are only a few class meetings, including a guest lecture on ethics, which can be recorded. In addition, there are individually scheduled conferences. In Winter term, there are optional class meetings and practice arguments. Participation in the oral argument competition is mandatory, which includes attendance at the semifinal and final arguments. The preliminary rounds are held in the evening; the semifinal and final rounds are in the late afternoon. Prior to the Competition itself, materials and l more »
The major moot court activity at Stanford Law School is the Marion Rice Kirkwood Memorial Competition, which takes place each year during Autumn and Winter terms. Autumn term will be dedicated to brief writing and completion of the written portion of the Competition; the oral argument portion of the Competition will be conducted during the first four to five weeks of Winter term. Students on externship and in clinics may enroll, if permitted by their respective programs. In Autumn term there are only a few class meetings, including a guest lecture on ethics, which can be recorded. In addition, there are individually scheduled conferences. In Winter term, there are optional class meetings and practice arguments. Participation in the oral argument competition is mandatory, which includes attendance at the semifinal and final arguments. The preliminary rounds are held in the evening; the semifinal and final rounds are in the late afternoon. Prior to the Competition itself, materials and lectures are provided on research, brief writing, and oral advocacy techniques. Registration for the Kirkwood Competition is by team. Each team is required to submit an appellate brief of substantial length and quality and to complete at least two oral arguments, one on each side of an actual case. The first draft of the brief is reviewed and critiqued by the course instructors. The course instructors and the Moot Court Board Presidents score the final draft of the brief. The course also offers digital recording and critiques of practice oral arguments. Panels of judges and local attorneys serve as judges who score the oral argument portion of the Competition. Teams are selected for the quarterfinal, semifinal, and final round of the Competition based on their brief and oral advocacy scores. The final round of the Competition is held before a panel of distinguished judges, and the entire Law School community is invited to attend. Special Instructions: In order to maintain academic standards, enrollment in the Kirkwood Competition is limited to 20 two-person teams. This limit will be strictly enforced. Registration forms will be distributed Spring term. If the program is oversubscribed, a lottery will be held to determine participating teams and to establish a waiting list. The final drop deadline for the course will be on Thursday of the first week of classes. Enrollment in both Autumn (2 units) and Winter (1 unit) terms is required. The final grade for both Autumn and Winter terms and the Professional Skills credit will be awarded upon the completion of the course requirements. Registration and Consent Instructions: Instructions on how to register for the Moot Court competition are sent out to students each year in Spring term for the coming academic year. The registration process is separate from the regular class registration process. Early application and drop deadlines. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory completion of appellate brief and oral arguments.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

LAW 7820: Moot Court

The major moot court activity at Stanford Law School is the Marion Rice Kirkwood Memorial Competition, which takes place each year during Autumn and Winter terms. Autumn term will be dedicated to brief writing and completion of the written portion of the Competition; the oral argument portion of the Competition will be conducted during the first four to five weeks of Winter term. Students on externship and in clinics may enroll, if permitted by their respective programs. In Autumn term there are only a few class meetings, including a guest lecture on ethics, which can be recorded. In addition, there are individually scheduled conferences. In Winter term, there are optional class meetings and practice arguments. Participation in the oral argument competition is mandatory, which includes attendance at the semifinal and final arguments. The preliminary rounds are held in the evening; the semifinal and final rounds are in the late afternoon. Prior to the Competition itself, materials and l more »
The major moot court activity at Stanford Law School is the Marion Rice Kirkwood Memorial Competition, which takes place each year during Autumn and Winter terms. Autumn term will be dedicated to brief writing and completion of the written portion of the Competition; the oral argument portion of the Competition will be conducted during the first four to five weeks of Winter term. Students on externship and in clinics may enroll, if permitted by their respective programs. In Autumn term there are only a few class meetings, including a guest lecture on ethics, which can be recorded. In addition, there are individually scheduled conferences. In Winter term, there are optional class meetings and practice arguments. Participation in the oral argument competition is mandatory, which includes attendance at the semifinal and final arguments. The preliminary rounds are held in the evening; the semifinal and final rounds are in the late afternoon. Prior to the Competition itself, materials and lectures are provided on research, brief writing, and oral advocacy techniques. Registration for the Kirkwood Competition is by team. Each team is required to submit an appellate brief of substantial length and quality and to complete at least two oral arguments, one on each side of an actual case. The first draft of the brief is reviewed and critiqued by the course instructors. The course instructors and the Moot Court Board Presidents score the final draft of the brief. The course also offers digital recording and critiques of practice oral arguments. Panels of judges and local attorneys serve as judges who score the oral argument portion of the Competition. Teams are selected for the quarterfinal, semifinal, and final round of the Competition based on their brief and oral advocacy scores. The final round of the Competition is held before a panel of distinguished judges, and the entire Law School community is invited to attend. Special Instructions: In order to maintain academic standards, enrollment in the Kirkwood Competition is limited to 20 two-person teams. This limit will be strictly enforced. Registration forms will be distributed Spring term. If the program is oversubscribed, a lottery will be held to determine participating teams and to establish a waiting list. The final drop deadline for the course will be on Thursday of the first week of classes. Enrollment in both Autumn (2 units) and Winter (1 unit) terms is required. The final grade for both Autumn and Winter terms and the Professional Skills credit will be awarded upon the completion of the course requirements. Registration and Consent Instructions: Instructions on how to register for the Moot Court competition are sent out to students each year in Spring term for the coming academic year. The registration process is separate from the regular class registration process. Early application and drop deadlines. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory completion of appellate brief and oral arguments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

LAW 7821: Negotiation

As a lawyer, you will probably negotiate more than you do anything else. You will negotiate not just over cases, but any time that you need something that you cannot get alone. You will negotiate with your boss, your clients, your paralegal, and all of their counterparts (plus the lawyers) on the other side. You will negotiate with "the system" whether it is the court, the government, the structure of society, or the law. You will also continue to negotiate with your family, your friends, and yourself. This course is designed to: (1) develop your understanding of negotiation, and your awareness of yourself as a negotiator; (2) give you some tools and concepts for analyzing and preparing for negotiations; (3) enhance your negotiating skills through frequent role plays, reflection, and feedback; and (4) teach you how to keep learning from your own negotiation experience. In addition to negotiation skills and theory (including interviewing, counseling, negotiation, fact analysis, legal an more »
As a lawyer, you will probably negotiate more than you do anything else. You will negotiate not just over cases, but any time that you need something that you cannot get alone. You will negotiate with your boss, your clients, your paralegal, and all of their counterparts (plus the lawyers) on the other side. You will negotiate with "the system" whether it is the court, the government, the structure of society, or the law. You will also continue to negotiate with your family, your friends, and yourself. This course is designed to: (1) develop your understanding of negotiation, and your awareness of yourself as a negotiator; (2) give you some tools and concepts for analyzing and preparing for negotiations; (3) enhance your negotiating skills through frequent role plays, reflection, and feedback; and (4) teach you how to keep learning from your own negotiation experience. In addition to negotiation skills and theory (including interviewing, counseling, negotiation, fact analysis, legal analysis, and collaboration), you will be introduced to issues of representation, ethics, and the place of negotiation in our legal system. The Negotiation Seminar is an intense, interactive course. We will require weekly preparation of readings, simulations, and written assignments. Basically, you will learn by reading about specific research and doing simulated negotiations -- figuring out with the rest of the class what works and what does not, writing about what you're learning, and trying again. Because participation in the simulations is central to the course, attendance at all classes is required. Since we will begin our simulation exercises on the first day of class, all students who are interested in taking the course (whether enrolled or on the wait-list) need to be present for the first class. (Students who are not present will be dropped from the class or waiting list unless they have made previous arrangements with the instructor.) Add-drop decisions need to be resolved at the first class. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and written assignments.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3

LAW 7822: Negotiation on the Ground: Discussions at the Intersection of Theory and Practice

We can read any number of books about negotiation, but how do the concepts and principles play out in the real world? This dinner colloquium will meet with distinguished negotiators working in a variety of fields to reflect on and draw lessons from their deep and diverse experience. Guests for last year spoke on: studio and talent perspectives in entertainment negotiations; working relationship between inside and outside transactional counsel in technology M&A; prosecution and defense perspectives on negotiating in the criminal justice system; and public policy negotiation on gun law issues. For each session, students will read a background piece on issues in the selected area of legal practice and submit a discussion question to facilitate a discussion with the guests on client counseling, factual and legal analysis, negotiation and conflict resolution options, and collaboration. Pre-Requisite: Negotiation Seminar or substantial equivalent. Schedule: Monday, 5:30-8:00pm. There will be an organizing class on March 30, 5:30-6p, plus four presentation/dinner discussion sessions in April and May. Elements used in grading: Class participation, assignments and attendance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

LAW 7823: Advanced Negotiation: International

Mastering the fundamentals of negotiation and conflict resolution in the international domain is now more critical than ever. This hands-on, advanced seminar is designed to teach students how to prepare for, participate in, and critically evaluate complex multiparty negotiations in the public international field. Through experience-based learning and simulations, the course will expose students to various types of international conflict resolution processes, including natural resource management and extractive industries, ceasefire negotiations, and peace agreements. Students will strengthen their written and oral skills, counseling, factual and legal analysis. Special attention will be paid to the role of mediators and facilitators in such processes. Prerequisites: Negotiation Seminar, its substantial academic equivalent, or substantial experience in the field. SPILS students are especially encouraged to enroll. This course is also open to cross-registration by graduate students in a more »
Mastering the fundamentals of negotiation and conflict resolution in the international domain is now more critical than ever. This hands-on, advanced seminar is designed to teach students how to prepare for, participate in, and critically evaluate complex multiparty negotiations in the public international field. Through experience-based learning and simulations, the course will expose students to various types of international conflict resolution processes, including natural resource management and extractive industries, ceasefire negotiations, and peace agreements. Students will strengthen their written and oral skills, counseling, factual and legal analysis. Special attention will be paid to the role of mediators and facilitators in such processes. Prerequisites: Negotiation Seminar, its substantial academic equivalent, or substantial experience in the field. SPILS students are especially encouraged to enroll. This course is also open to cross-registration by graduate students in a variety of departments and programs including International Policy Studies. Please describe prior negotiations coursework and experience on your Consent Form. Any student deemed to be lacking the required foundational knowledge may still be admitted to the course, but required to attend an intensive bootcamp in basic negotiation theory and methods on Saturday, April 6th. Grading Criteria: The seminar requires that students attend all classes, do the assigned reading, prepare for and actively participate in class and simulations, and write a series of short assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit the Consent Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Powell, B. (PI)

LAW 7824: Advanced Negotiation: Environmental Policy

Advanced Negotiation courses are designed to take students beyond the two-party, lawyer-client negotiations that were the focus of the Negotiation Seminar, to examine many facets of negotiation complexity, both in terms of the participants and topics. This section of Advanced Negotiation will focus on two-party and multi-party environmental policy negotiations, working in teams, group decision-making, coalition management, and negotiating on behalf of organizations to solve complex problems in environmental policy. The goals of the class are twofold, for students (1) to acquire an added theoretical base beyond what was covered in the Negotiation Seminar through which to analyze (in terms of law and facts), prepare for, participate in and facilitate more complex, multiparty negotiations, and (2) to expand skills through deeper examination of various actual negotiation cases and complex simulations, including ethical responsibilities to the client and the public, opportunities for leader more »
Advanced Negotiation courses are designed to take students beyond the two-party, lawyer-client negotiations that were the focus of the Negotiation Seminar, to examine many facets of negotiation complexity, both in terms of the participants and topics. This section of Advanced Negotiation will focus on two-party and multi-party environmental policy negotiations, working in teams, group decision-making, coalition management, and negotiating on behalf of organizations to solve complex problems in environmental policy. The goals of the class are twofold, for students (1) to acquire an added theoretical base beyond what was covered in the Negotiation Seminar through which to analyze (in terms of law and facts), prepare for, participate in and facilitate more complex, multiparty negotiations, and (2) to expand skills through deeper examination of various actual negotiation cases and complex simulations, including ethical responsibilities to the client and the public, opportunities for leadership, and collaboration. Special Instructions: Attendance at and participation in the simulations is required. Passing is dependent upon active preparation and participation, submission of several assigned short reflection papers, and completion of a selected case analysis (a completed or ongoing multi-party public policy dialogue). Prerequisite: Negotiation Seminar ( Law 7821) or its substantial equivalent. Advanced degree students (and graduate students in other departments and programs) are encouraged to enroll provided that they have previous negotiation training or equivalent practice experience. Elements used in grading: Class participation and engagement, including simulations; attendance; preparation for and contributions to discussion; and short written assignments
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Martinez, J. (PI)

LAW 7825: Advanced Negotiation: Transactions

Advanced Negotiation takes students beyond the two-party, lawyer-client negotiations that were the focus of the Negotiation Seminar. This course, Advanced Negotiation: Transactions, places the student in more difficult and more nuanced transactional simulations, working as individuals, lawyer-client pairs, and teams to negotiate on behalf of business entities, governments, unions and NGOs. Simulations may include critical-path supply agreements, vendor/collaborator contracts, cross-cultural joint ventures, airline reorganization, founder/VC deals, big pharma arbitration resolution and multi-party private sector/government negotiations. The goals of the class include developing a designer's mindset for strategic preparation and client counseling on both facts and law, and tactical adjustments to changing scenarios; ethical responsibilities; deeper analysis and work on the persuasive elements (oral and written) of negotiation; coalition formation and management; improved tactical skills, more »
Advanced Negotiation takes students beyond the two-party, lawyer-client negotiations that were the focus of the Negotiation Seminar. This course, Advanced Negotiation: Transactions, places the student in more difficult and more nuanced transactional simulations, working as individuals, lawyer-client pairs, and teams to negotiate on behalf of business entities, governments, unions and NGOs. Simulations may include critical-path supply agreements, vendor/collaborator contracts, cross-cultural joint ventures, airline reorganization, founder/VC deals, big pharma arbitration resolution and multi-party private sector/government negotiations. The goals of the class include developing a designer's mindset for strategic preparation and client counseling on both facts and law, and tactical adjustments to changing scenarios; ethical responsibilities; deeper analysis and work on the persuasive elements (oral and written) of negotiation; coalition formation and management; improved tactical skills, methods of questioning, response control and, ultimately, improved confidence and competence. Special Instructions: Attendance at and participation in all simulations and debriefing sessions is required. Passing is dependent upon this active participation, and a series of short papers and/or in-class presentations. Prerequisite: Negotiation Seminar or its substantial equivalent, as assessed by the instructor. This class is limited to 20 students, 16 from SLS selected by lottery, with an effort to have 4 non-law students by consent of instructor. Elements used in grading: attendance, participation in both the negotiations and the debriefings, thorough and meaningful preparation, and all other assigned work.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Martinez, J. (PI)

LAW 7826: Oral Argument Workshop

Building on the skills developed in Federal Litigation, this simulation course will give students the unique opportunity to argue and judge pretrial motions from actual federal court cases. The instructor will provide the written briefs, and each week half the class will argue and half the class will judge a motion. Preparation will require reading the cases cited in the briefs and coming to class ready either to present an argument (attorneys) or interrogate counsel (judges). Students will critique each other both orally and in writing, and the instructor will provide oral critiques of all arguments. The goals of this class are: to train students to argue in court; to provide them with a chance to polish their public speaking skills and practice thinking on their feet; to prepare students to engage in challenging dialogue with both colleagues and future clients; and to improve self-confidence. Thus, while the context of the course is litigation, the objectives are much broader than th more »
Building on the skills developed in Federal Litigation, this simulation course will give students the unique opportunity to argue and judge pretrial motions from actual federal court cases. The instructor will provide the written briefs, and each week half the class will argue and half the class will judge a motion. Preparation will require reading the cases cited in the briefs and coming to class ready either to present an argument (attorneys) or interrogate counsel (judges). Students will critique each other both orally and in writing, and the instructor will provide oral critiques of all arguments. The goals of this class are: to train students to argue in court; to provide them with a chance to polish their public speaking skills and practice thinking on their feet; to prepare students to engage in challenging dialogue with both colleagues and future clients; and to improve self-confidence. Thus, while the context of the course is litigation, the objectives are much broader than the mastery of litigation technique. This course is not open to first year Law School students. Priority will be given to those students who commit to taking the class if given consent to enroll. Please indicate your commitment on the consent form. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Class attendance, participation, and preparation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Fenner, R. (PI)

LAW 7827: Advanced Legal Writing for American Practice

This course orients advanced degree students to a range of legal writing genres used by lawyers in practice in American law offices and before American courts. At the core of these genres are the techniques of legal research, objective and persuasive legal writing, and related legal analysis in a litigation context. The course presents students with realistic legal writing scenarios that they address in and out of class. Students perform legal research and analysis as they complete assignments designed to incorporate methods that American lawyers use to analyze typical legal problems while advocating on behalf of a hypothetical client in a litigation matter. This class is limited to Advanced Degree Students. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Rowe, B. (PI)

LAW 7828: Trial Advocacy Workshop

This lawyering skills course gives students an orientation to and constant practice in most basic pretrial and trial advocacy skills areas. Topics include: taking and defending depositions, trial evidence, including admission of trial exhibits in evidence and use of prior witness statements to refresh and impeach a witness, jury selection and voir dire, opening statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, expert witnesses, and closing arguments. Students will try a full jury case through to verdict with use of jurors and usually before a real judge in the courthouse in Palo Alto at the end of the course. Students will also have a chance to watch the jurors deliberate and talk with them after their verdict. The course takes place during seven weeks of the Autumn Quarter with two classes (one lecture and one workshop) per week on most weeks from 4:15-9:00 PM (these usually occur on M, W, or Th), plus the final weekend of jury trials, Saturday and Sunday November 16 and 17. Each more »
This lawyering skills course gives students an orientation to and constant practice in most basic pretrial and trial advocacy skills areas. Topics include: taking and defending depositions, trial evidence, including admission of trial exhibits in evidence and use of prior witness statements to refresh and impeach a witness, jury selection and voir dire, opening statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, expert witnesses, and closing arguments. Students will try a full jury case through to verdict with use of jurors and usually before a real judge in the courthouse in Palo Alto at the end of the course. Students will also have a chance to watch the jurors deliberate and talk with them after their verdict. The course takes place during seven weeks of the Autumn Quarter with two classes (one lecture and one workshop) per week on most weeks from 4:15-9:00 PM (these usually occur on M, W, or Th), plus the final weekend of jury trials, Saturday and Sunday November 16 and 17. Each day's ending time will vary; most sessions will end before 9:00 PM. For details, please refer to the 2019 Trial Advocacy Workshop Schedule at https://tinyurl.com/TrialAd2019. The format for each topic begins with a lecture/discussion featuring video vignettes of various techniques and a live demonstration by an expert trial lawyer. Following the discussion portion of each topic are small group sessions during which each student practices the skills involved. Constructive feedback is given after each exercise by two of our faculty of very experienced Bay Area litigators and judges. Most exercises are also videoed for further one-on-one critique by another faculty member. The central philosophy of the workshop is that skills are best acquired in an experiential manner by seeing and doing. Frequent short, well-defined exercises followed by immediate constructive feedback in a non-competitive, non-threatening atmosphere provide the core of the program. The workshop directors are Tim Hallahan, Judge Sallie Kim and Sara Peters. Tim has taught similar programs at Harvard Law School, the University of San Francisco School of Law, Berkeley Law, the California Continuing Education of the Bar, and in private and public interest law firms around the country. Sallie is a United States Magistrate Judge in San Francisco and was a partner in a civil litigation firm and also previously taught a class at SLS and served as Associate Dean for Student Affairs. Sara is a trial attorney for a personal injury law firm in San Francisco. She graduated from Stanford Law School in 2008 and coaches the Stanford Law School mock trial team. Special Instructions: If you haven't taken Evidence you must contact Tim Hallahan before the course begins for some brief pre-course reading assignments. There are no papers or tests, but attendance at every session is required. Since we will begin our trial advocacy exercises on the first day of class, all students who are interested in taking the course (whether enrolled or on the wait-list) need to be present for the first class. (Students who are not present will be dropped from the class or waiting list unless they have made previous arrangements with the professor.) Add-drop decisions need to be resolved at the first class; no drops will be permitted thereafter. Exceptions to this rule will be made by petition only. Mandatory attendance. Elements used in grading: Attendance and in-class assignments. In addition, the Trial Advocacy Workshop is approved to offer Experiential Learning (EL) Credit. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
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