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421 - 430 of 460 results for: LAW

LAW 7805: Career Development: Alchemy, Law, and Practice

Career development is embedded in life development. This course offers a space and time for each student to consider both through course materials, class interactions, and a series of reflection papers. The course includes one class facilitated in collaboration with the Office of Career Services focusing on a formal assessment via one or more psychological tests offered to each student. The materials for other class meetings are thought provoking works that have proven to be salient for considering career and life direction. Images and material from alchemy that embody what many consider to be a primary set of symbols for personal transformation provide a backdrop for the course. The course benefits from the collaboration of Michael Guasperini, a mythologist and lawyer whose primary vocation is working intimately with lawyers and firms during periods of personal and institutional transition. Mr. Guasperini has deep experience with the personal lives of hundreds of lawyers at various ages and levels of professional development, providing a valuable and practical perspective for self-reflection. Elements used in grading: Written Assignments (reflection papers).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Strnad, J. (PI)

LAW 7806: Dispute System Design

Lawyers are often called upon to help design systems for preventing, managing, and resolving conflicts that support or supplant existing legal structures. The crisis of September 11 led Congress to pass a law creating the September 11 Fund; a California Supreme Court challenge to its method of resolving health care disputes led Kaiser Permanente to reform its arbitration system; years of atrocities committed against the people of South Africa, Chile, and many other countries led to the formation of truth commissions. Lawyers often lead the design and implementation of these conflict resolution systems. Increasingly these systems utilize technology to improve efficiency, accessibility, and transparency for disputants. In this class we will apply an analytic framework (including stakeholder assessment and conflict resolution process options) to a series of case studies and use simulations to understand different kinds of dispute systems. We will also examine the growing use of online dis more »
Lawyers are often called upon to help design systems for preventing, managing, and resolving conflicts that support or supplant existing legal structures. The crisis of September 11 led Congress to pass a law creating the September 11 Fund; a California Supreme Court challenge to its method of resolving health care disputes led Kaiser Permanente to reform its arbitration system; years of atrocities committed against the people of South Africa, Chile, and many other countries led to the formation of truth commissions. Lawyers often lead the design and implementation of these conflict resolution systems. Increasingly these systems utilize technology to improve efficiency, accessibility, and transparency for disputants. In this class we will apply an analytic framework (including stakeholder assessment and conflict resolution process options) to a series of case studies and use simulations to understand different kinds of dispute systems. We will also examine the growing use of online dispute resolution (ODR), the new challenges it poses to neutrals and system designers, and evolving best practices for the use of technology in dispute system design. Special Instructions: Grades will be based on class participation and Option 1 (section 01) a series of weekly short written assignments plus a 10-page case study; or Option 2 (section 02) weekly short written assignments plus a 26-page research paper involving independent research. Students electing option 2 (section 02) will be graded on the H/P/R/F system and will receive Research (R) credit. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Negotiation Seminar ( LAW 7821) is preferred but not required. The class will meet on one Saturday. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments, and final paper. Attendance at the first class is mandatory.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 7807: Facilitation for Attorneys

Most lawyers and other professionals spend a significant amount of time in meetings and working in teams or groups for a variety of purposes, and many report that this can be a frustrating experience. As the practice of law becomes more complex, it includes more and more situations where groups of people need to work together planning complex legal strategies, developing firm policies, working with corporations or other multi-person clients, or participating in shareholder meetings, public commissions and councils, corporate and non-profit Board of Directors meetings. Group functionality and outcomes can be significantly improved by any group member who has the awareness and skills of a facilitator, whether or not that person is formally designated as the facilitator. The interactive class methodology will combine discussion with many exercises and roleplays, putting facilitation tools into practice every step of the way. We will examine group dynamics and learn skills used by professi more »
Most lawyers and other professionals spend a significant amount of time in meetings and working in teams or groups for a variety of purposes, and many report that this can be a frustrating experience. As the practice of law becomes more complex, it includes more and more situations where groups of people need to work together planning complex legal strategies, developing firm policies, working with corporations or other multi-person clients, or participating in shareholder meetings, public commissions and councils, corporate and non-profit Board of Directors meetings. Group functionality and outcomes can be significantly improved by any group member who has the awareness and skills of a facilitator, whether or not that person is formally designated as the facilitator. The interactive class methodology will combine discussion with many exercises and roleplays, putting facilitation tools into practice every step of the way. We will examine group dynamics and learn skills used by professional facilitators to prevent common problems and elicit the best work of a group. We will explore how to prepare effectively with clear goals, collaborative problem definition, inclusive process design and a well-structured agenda. We will also discuss and practice core meeting management skills such as how to balance voice and participation, build consensus, inspire creativity and promote principled evaluation and decision-making. Finally, we will identify and apply communication skills that keep group sessions productive and tools to manage difficult moments and problem behaviors. Class Schedule dates: Oct. 18th. (4:00 -- 9p.m.), Oct 19th. (9 -- 5:00) and Oct. 27th. (9 -- 5:00). Elements used in grading: Class attendance, participation and final paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Notini, J. (PI)

LAW 7808: Foreign and International Legal Research

(Formerly Law 461) This course will introduce students to concepts and skills used in international and foreign law research. Students will learn to construct successful research strategies for questions of foreign law, public international law, and private international law. Both primary and secondary authority will be covered in various formats. Students will understand how different legal systems and cultures influence the use and assessment of legal resources. The course will also equip students to critically evaluate current and future research tools. No pre-requisites or foreign language ability required. Advanced degree and non-law students are welcome to enroll in the course. Learning Outcomes -- *Identify primary and secondary sources of materials on international law and foreign legal systems. *Develop effective research strategies using online and print resources. *Critically evaluate research tools for international and foreign legal research. *Appreciate cultural and historical influences on the development of legal systems and their relevance to legal research. *Understand the role of language and translation tools in researching foreign and international law. Elements used in grading: Weekly assignments.
Last offered: Winter 2018

LAW 7809: Advanced Legal Research

The course is designed to prepare law students for research in practice and clerkships. The course will review sources of legal authority and how this material is used, organized, published, indexed, and kept current. Objectives for the course are: 1) to show students how to find and evaluate legal research sources and use them effectively, with particular emphasis on cost-effective research; 2) to expand research skills in primary and secondary U.S. legal sources; and 3) to introduce students to the array of non-legal information resources useful to legal practice. Learning legal research requires a hands-on approach, so students will complete in-class exercises and homework assignments -- all of which contribute to grading. There will not be a final exam. This course is open to Stanford graduate students with permission from the instructor.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2

LAW 7815: Advanced Legal Writing: Business Transactions

This course offers comprehensive preparation for practice of the transactional lawyer. Students will learn the foundational tools necessary to write clear, effective, plain language business contracts and analyze other transactional writings used to manage and document complex business transactions. The course provides interactive lectures and a wide range of realistic drafting and research exercises, completed both inside and outside of class, both individually and collaboratively. These exercises help students improve their research, analysis, drafting, and editing skills and develop sensitivity to the expectations of attorneys and clients with whom they will be working. Students will learn the research and analytical tools necessary to interpret provisions in a variety of business agreements. Issues related to ethics in a transactional practice will also be addressed. The course should appeal especially to students interested in working for a law firm and practicing transactional la more »
This course offers comprehensive preparation for practice of the transactional lawyer. Students will learn the foundational tools necessary to write clear, effective, plain language business contracts and analyze other transactional writings used to manage and document complex business transactions. The course provides interactive lectures and a wide range of realistic drafting and research exercises, completed both inside and outside of class, both individually and collaboratively. These exercises help students improve their research, analysis, drafting, and editing skills and develop sensitivity to the expectations of attorneys and clients with whom they will be working. Students will learn the research and analytical tools necessary to interpret provisions in a variety of business agreements. Issues related to ethics in a transactional practice will also be addressed. The course should appeal especially to students interested in working for a law firm and practicing transactional law (be it corporate, venture, debt, intellectual property, mergers and acquisitions, entertainment, real estate, etc.). It will also appeal to those interested in business litigation, or those curious about the work of transactional lawyers. SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS: Students on the waitlist for the course will be admitted if spots are available on the basis of priority and degree program. Early drop deadline: Students may not drop this course after first week of class. Corporations ( Law 1013) is a prerequisite for all but LLM (CGP) students. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments, and final paper. Please consult the syllabus for paper and assignment deadlines.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Bautista, M. (PI)

LAW 7816: Advanced Legal Writing: Litigation

Building on the skills developed in Federal Litigation, this course will give students additional practice with legal analysis, argument structure, and writing in the pre-trial context. Students will draft a predictive office memo, an e-mail memo, and memorandum in support of a motion for summary judgment. Students also will complete short writing exercises in class to practice skills such as omitting surplus words, preferring active voice, using concrete words, punctuating carefully, etc. The goals of this class are to help students organize facts and legal rules and analysis in a succinct and logical way, to deepen their understanding of legal reasoning and writing, and to hone their advocacy skills. The course should appeal to students interested in litigation practice and those wishing to strengthen their writing. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Written work, class participation, and attendance
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Pearson, L. (PI)

LAW 7817: Advanced Legal Writing: Global Litigation

This course offers an introduction to the practical, procedural and analytical aspects of private transnational litigation in the U.S. and Europe. Through a case simulation students will examine differences in legal systems and how to effectively navigate the challenges and opportunities presented when litigation goes global. With three instructors and limited student enrollment, the class provides an excellent opportunity for students to develop the research, writing and oral advocacy skills necessary for a successful transnational litigation practice. Elements used in grading: class participation, attendance, assignments.
Last offered: Spring 2017

LAW 7818: Advanced Legal Writing: Technology Transactions

This course covers the foundations of drafting contracts in a modern commercial setting, primarily through weekly hands-on writing exercises that illustrate business problems commonly found in today's technology transactions law practice. Topics to be addressed will include basic contract anatomy, common clause ambiguities, structuring for readable "flow", and drafting-for-negotiation techniques. Final examination will involve crafting a full-length technology license agreement from a rough term sheet that appears to have been pecked out on some sort of mobile device. No prior business law coursework, intellectual property background, or martial arts proficiency required. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Lee, R. (PI)

LAW 7819: Mediation

As law is practiced today, attorneys are far more likely to participate in multiple mediations than trial. Mediation has become the preferred approach to conflict resolution in most states and many parts of the world. With the assistance of a mediator, parties can reach agreements at any stage in a dispute, in some cases avoiding litigation altogether, in other cases agreeing just before trial or when the case is on appeal. The course goals are to understand the nature of conflict and principles of conflict management, to develop the oral and written communication skills essential to effective mediation, to evaluate various mediation models and mediator styles, to practice all of the phases of a mediation and appropriate use of caucus, to consider the policy and ethical implications of the expanding use of mediation, and to develop the skills necessary to represent clients in mediation. The class methodology is highly experiential, with more than half of the class consisting of practic more »
As law is practiced today, attorneys are far more likely to participate in multiple mediations than trial. Mediation has become the preferred approach to conflict resolution in most states and many parts of the world. With the assistance of a mediator, parties can reach agreements at any stage in a dispute, in some cases avoiding litigation altogether, in other cases agreeing just before trial or when the case is on appeal. The course goals are to understand the nature of conflict and principles of conflict management, to develop the oral and written communication skills essential to effective mediation, to evaluate various mediation models and mediator styles, to practice all of the phases of a mediation and appropriate use of caucus, to consider the policy and ethical implications of the expanding use of mediation, and to develop the skills necessary to represent clients in mediation. The class methodology is highly experiential, with more than half of the class consisting of practice from the perspective of client, advocate and mediator. The course also includes readings and discussions, brief interactive lectures, demonstrations and videotaped sessions. Each student receives individual feedback from an experienced Bay Area mediator and develops skills that will be useful in client development, interviewing, counseling, fact development and legal analysis, negotiation and a variety of contexts beyond mediation. You are encouraged to apply if you have taken (or are concurrently taking) the basic negotiation class or its equivalent in studies or experience. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance at all classes, and assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Notini, J. (PI)
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