2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

411 - 420 of 461 results for: LAW

LAW 7510: Research Design for Empirical Legal Studies

Empirical legal studies have become popular in the U.S. and are now spreading to non-U.S. law faculties as well. Usually the term applies to analyses of quantitative data and the researcher relies on data collected by others. But the term "empirical" properly encompasses both qualitative and quantitative data, including interviews, legal documents, survey research and experimental results. Analysts interested in using such data need to understand how they were collected, in order to decide what data can appropriately be used to answer different kinds of questions. Often to answer the questions of interest, a researcher needs to collect new data, which poses challenging questions about how to design an empirical research study. Answering these questions appropriately is important to ensure publication in a peer-reviewed journal, which is becoming increasingly important to legal academia. This seminar will introduce students to the wide range of research methods that can be used to answe more »
Empirical legal studies have become popular in the U.S. and are now spreading to non-U.S. law faculties as well. Usually the term applies to analyses of quantitative data and the researcher relies on data collected by others. But the term "empirical" properly encompasses both qualitative and quantitative data, including interviews, legal documents, survey research and experimental results. Analysts interested in using such data need to understand how they were collected, in order to decide what data can appropriately be used to answer different kinds of questions. Often to answer the questions of interest, a researcher needs to collect new data, which poses challenging questions about how to design an empirical research study. Answering these questions appropriately is important to ensure publication in a peer-reviewed journal, which is becoming increasingly important to legal academia. This seminar will introduce students to the wide range of research methods that can be used to answer empirical questions, provide a framework for choosing among methods, and explain how to use the methods. The project for the quarter is to design an empirical research study on a topic of your choice. Special Instructions: JD students can take the class for 3-4 units. SPILS students must take this class for 4 units. Students taking the course for 4 units must attend the additional session on Thursday, which is optional for others. After the term begins, JD students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which can potentially satisfy the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Consent Application for JD students: To apply for this course, JD students must e-mail the instructors for permission to enroll. This course is REQUIRED for all SPILS fellows and BY CONSENT for all other students. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, class presentation, written assignments and final paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

LAW 7511: Sociology of Law

This course explores major issues and debates in the sociology of law. Topics include historical perspectives on the origins of law; rationality and legal sanctions; normative decision making and morality; cognitive decision making; crime and deviance, with particular attention to the problem of mass incarceration; the "law in action" versus the "law on the books;" organizational responses to law, particularly in the context of sexual harassment and discrimination in education and employment; the roles of lawyers, judges, and juries; and law and social change with particular emphasis on the American civil rights movement. Special Instructions: Students are expected to attend a weekly TA-led discussion section in addition to lecture. Sections will be scheduled after the start of term at times when all students can attend. Paper requirements are flexible. Cross listed with the Sociology Department ( Soc 136/236). See "Special Instructions" in course description above. Elements Used in Grading: Class participation, paper proposal, three short papers and a final paper (see syllabus for details).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Dauber, M. (PI)

LAW 7512: Statistical Inference in Law

Drawing inferences from quantitative data lies at the heart of many legal and policy decisions. This course provides the tools, concepts, and framework for lawyers to become sophisticated consumers of quantitative evidence and social science. The course will focus on a number of empirical debates -- for example, does the death penalty deter murder, do concealed handgun laws influence crime -- as a springboard to teach the logic and terminology of statistical/econometric evaluation of law and policy (regression, statistical significance, identification). No background, beyond high school algebra, is assumed. Anyone who 1) will work in litigation (whether corporate, securities, antitrust, employment discrimination, environmental law) or in public policy, 2) wants to be a better citizen or 3) wants to understand the challenges of establishing causal relationships, and who doesn't already have a strong understanding of statistics will find this course useful. Elements Used in Grading: Attendance, written assignments, response papers, and a final project. To avoid math phobias and fears about ringers from the econ or stats departments, the course is graded as a mandatory pass-fail course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Donohue, J. (PI)

LAW 7514: Behavioral Law and Economics

The field of "law and economics" provides important lessons for how legal institutions should be designed, but many of those lessons rely on the assumption that individuals behave in a way that maximizes their self-interest. Research from psychology and behavioral economics casts doubt on this assumption in many legal contexts. This seminar will explore a range of topics about human decision-making, focusing on how research in this area should inform the design of policy. Special Instructions: Grades will be based on class attendance, class participation, and either several short reflection papers (section (01)) or an independent research paper (section (02)). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on paper length. Elements used in grading: class participation, class attendance, reflection papers or research paper. Early drop deadline.
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 7515: Law and the New Political Economy

In this seminar, we consider key legal topics through the lens of political economy -- that is, is the interplay among economics, law, and politics. This perspective has had a powerful and growing impact on how scholars and judges view the nature and scope of law and politics in the modern regulatory state. We look at a range of topics from this perspective, including: constitutional law, statutory interpretation, administrative law and regulation, and jurisprudence -- all with an eye toward better understanding the dynamic interaction among law, politics, and social change. There are no prerequisites for this seminar. Elements used in grading: The final assignment will be a substantial research paper. Cross-listed with Political Science ( POLISCI 225L/325L).
Last offered: Autumn 2018

LAW 7518: Social Science of Identity and Prejudice

This a one-unit, Law Mandatory P/R/F course that grows out of the recommendations of the 2018 Faculty and Student Working Group on Diversity and Inclusion. The course is built around a series of outside speakers on identity and prejudice. These speakers will include the sociologist Lawrence Bobo (W.E.B. Du Bois Professor of Social Sciences at Harvard) and the psychologist Mahzarin Benaji (Richard Clark Cabot Professor of Social Ethics at Harvard). The lectures will be open to all members of the Stanford community. Students who wish to get course credit will be required to attend the lectures, participate in faculty and student-led discussions and write reflection papers. The course consists of 10 hours of lecture and discussion. The course is formally offered in the Spring Quarter, 2019 and credit for the course will be given at that time. However, the lectures and discussions will take place throughout the school year. The first of the lectures will take place on Wednesday, October 31 more »
This a one-unit, Law Mandatory P/R/F course that grows out of the recommendations of the 2018 Faculty and Student Working Group on Diversity and Inclusion. The course is built around a series of outside speakers on identity and prejudice. These speakers will include the sociologist Lawrence Bobo (W.E.B. Du Bois Professor of Social Sciences at Harvard) and the psychologist Mahzarin Benaji (Richard Clark Cabot Professor of Social Ethics at Harvard). The lectures will be open to all members of the Stanford community. Students who wish to get course credit will be required to attend the lectures, participate in faculty and student-led discussions and write reflection papers. The course consists of 10 hours of lecture and discussion. The course is formally offered in the Spring Quarter, 2019 and credit for the course will be given at that time. However, the lectures and discussions will take place throughout the school year. The first of the lectures will take place on Wednesday, October 31 at 4 pm. Students unable to attend the lecture on October 31 may still participate in the upcoming lectures to be announced. Students who wish to take the course should sign up now so as to be notified of the time of the lectures and discussion sessions. Students with questions about the course should email Joseph Bankman at jbankman@stanford.edu. Begin in Autumn Quarter and run through Spring Quarter. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Spring 2019

LAW 7519: Empirical Legal Studies Workshop

Empirical Legal Studies uses data to inform legal and policy debates. Traditional empirical legal scholarship uses methods such as observational studies and experiments to examine the effects of various policies or legal decisions. More recently, advancements in technology have given rise to a new strand of research that uses tools such as machine learning and natural language processing to study legally relevant datasets at a large scale ("Big Data"). This seminar will present a range of topics that highlight current empirical legal scholarship in these areas. A theme of the course will be comparing and contrasting traditional empirical approaches with the techniques emerging from machine learning and big data. During roughly half of the sessions, we will host a guest speaker who will present an ongoing empirical research project. Familiarity with data science or statistics is not required. Special Instructions: You may write a series of short commentaries on the guest speakers' paper more »
Empirical Legal Studies uses data to inform legal and policy debates. Traditional empirical legal scholarship uses methods such as observational studies and experiments to examine the effects of various policies or legal decisions. More recently, advancements in technology have given rise to a new strand of research that uses tools such as machine learning and natural language processing to study legally relevant datasets at a large scale ("Big Data"). This seminar will present a range of topics that highlight current empirical legal scholarship in these areas. A theme of the course will be comparing and contrasting traditional empirical approaches with the techniques emerging from machine learning and big data. During roughly half of the sessions, we will host a guest speaker who will present an ongoing empirical research project. Familiarity with data science or statistics is not required. Special Instructions: You may write a series of short commentaries on the guest speakers' papers, of which there will be four. Students electing this option will be graded on a Mandatory Pass/Restricted Credit/Fail basis and receive 2 units of credit. Alternatively, you may write a single empirical research paper on a legal topic of your choice. This will satisfy the Law School's Research requirement. These papers will be graded on an Honors/Pass/Restricted Credit/Fail basis. Students taking the seminar for R credit can take the seminar for either 2 or 3 units of credit (section 02), depending on the project. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. There is no formal prerequisite to take this seminar, though students doing the longer research papers typically have some prior training in statistics. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Four commentaries or one research paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

LAW 7801: Professional Development & Management Skills for Lawyers

This course will help students to develop the professional management skills that are essential for a successful legal career. The course will focus on team dynamics and leadership; influence and managing up; effectively communicating with clients, colleagues, other parties and tribunals; and managing expectations and unexpected adversity. For the final paper, students will have the option to write a reflection paper on one of the topics covered in class or create a professional development plan outlining the substantive knowledge, professional skills, and business focus the student intends to develop in order to build a fulfilling law practice. Assignments and simulations will demonstrate and model various skills, and instructors will provide real-time feedback to students on class exercises. The course does not focus on any particular type of practice (private sector, public interest, etc.), or substantive legal area. Elements used in grading: Class participation and attendance, cour more »
This course will help students to develop the professional management skills that are essential for a successful legal career. The course will focus on team dynamics and leadership; influence and managing up; effectively communicating with clients, colleagues, other parties and tribunals; and managing expectations and unexpected adversity. For the final paper, students will have the option to write a reflection paper on one of the topics covered in class or create a professional development plan outlining the substantive knowledge, professional skills, and business focus the student intends to develop in order to build a fulfilling law practice. Assignments and simulations will demonstrate and model various skills, and instructors will provide real-time feedback to students on class exercises. The course does not focus on any particular type of practice (private sector, public interest, etc.), or substantive legal area. Elements used in grading: Class participation and attendance, course exercises and written assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

LAW 7802: Accounting

Accounting is the language of business. In this course, we will learn basic accounting principles. We will focus on recent changes in accounting standards, such as changes to revenue recognition principles, that are likely to create difficulties for companies in the coming years. For example, we will consider how these changes affect contractual language and financial covenants. In this regard, this class differs significantly from a typical introductory accounting class and is more transactional-focused. Class time will be allocated to a combination of short lectures, group work, and discussions of the assigned readings. Evaluation will be based on problem sets assigned throughout the quarter. Please note that we focus on financial accounting principles--we will not cover tax law. Elements used in grading: Written Assignments. This class runs from January 27th through February 24th and will only meet on two Fridays (2/7 and 2/14).
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 7803: Alternative Dispute Resolution: Law, Practice, and Policy

Clients in disputes increasingly call for lawyers -- whether transactional or litigation -- with the skill to navigate within a broad range of alternative dispute resolution processes. In this course, you will learn about the variety of dispute resolution procedures that operate under the ADR umbrella, within and outside of the court system (including mediation and arbitration). The goal is for students to understand the law and policy behind these alternatives relative to court adjudication, to be able to select the appropriate process(es) and advocate for a client effectively. The teaching team and guests include third party neutrals and advocates from a range of contexts, including federal court, private mediation, private and public arbitration, and corporate legal counsel. Special Saturday class. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02) which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, discussion; three written assignments, final paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Martinez, J. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints