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401 - 410 of 460 results for: LAW

LAW 7096: Law and Politics of Bureaucracy

Modern government is bureaucratic government. In the words of Justice Jackson, the rise of the administrative state is likely "the most significant legal trend of the last century and perhaps more values today are affected by [agency] decisions than by those of all the courts." This seminar will survey the major ways in which law and political science have grappled with bureaucratic governance. How do we understand the rise of the administrative state? Why are bureaucracies designed the way they are? How do bureaucracies work in the face of legal and political constraints? And what avenues are there for meaningful regulatory reform? The class is cross-listed in political science and the law school and course enrollment will be by consent of instructor. Students will be responsible for writing short reflection papers and a research paper. Students may take the course for either 3, 4, or 5 units, depending on the paper length. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Political Science ( POLISCI 228C/428C).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Ho, D. (PI)

LAW 7501: Carrots, Sticks, Norms, and Nudges: Changing Minds and Behaviors

In this class, we will survey the current state of the science of behavior change. By the 1990s, social scientists had already built a massive literature on this topic, and an integrative consensus theoretical framework began to emerge. But in the past decade, this literature has been revitalized by dramatic new ideas and technologies, as well as significant improvements in evaluation methodology. We will focus on four types of strategies that apply equally to influence efforts by individuals, communities, non-profits, for-profits, and government: (1) Carrots: Positive incentives (rewards, awards, praise, recognition, discounts, rebates, property rights, etc.); (2) Sticks: Negative incentives (punishments, fines, shaming, guilt or liability verdicts, costs, etc.); (3) Norms: What other people believe I should do, and what I see others actually do (tipping points, bandwagons, cascades, herding, etc.); and (4) Nudges: Traditional methods of persuasion; use of defaults to encourage certai more »
In this class, we will survey the current state of the science of behavior change. By the 1990s, social scientists had already built a massive literature on this topic, and an integrative consensus theoretical framework began to emerge. But in the past decade, this literature has been revitalized by dramatic new ideas and technologies, as well as significant improvements in evaluation methodology. We will focus on four types of strategies that apply equally to influence efforts by individuals, communities, non-profits, for-profits, and government: (1) Carrots: Positive incentives (rewards, awards, praise, recognition, discounts, rebates, property rights, etc.); (2) Sticks: Negative incentives (punishments, fines, shaming, guilt or liability verdicts, costs, etc.); (3) Norms: What other people believe I should do, and what I see others actually do (tipping points, bandwagons, cascades, herding, etc.); and (4) Nudges: Traditional methods of persuasion; use of defaults to encourage certain behaviors; engineering the environment; harm reduction for risky behaviors. We will examine the "how" and "why" and "when" of these approaches, but also their normative implications for ethics, justice, and public welfare. Course requirements include class attendance and participation, and five short written assignments. For Research "R" credit, students may petition to complete one long paper based on independent research. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and/or final paper.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

LAW 7502: Economic Analysis of Law

This course will provide a broad overview of the scholarly field known as "law and economics." The focus will be on how legal rules and institutions can correct market failures. We will discuss the economic function of contracts and, when contracts fail or are not feasible, the role of legal remedies to resolve disputes. We will also discuss at some length the choice between encouraging private parties to initiate legal actions to correct externalities and governmental actors, such as regulatory authorities. Extensive attention will be given to the economics of litigation, and to how private incentives to bring lawsuits differ from the social value of litigation. The economic motive to commit crimes, and the optimal governmental response to crime, will be studied in depth. Specific topics within the preceding broad themes include: the Coase Theorem; the tradeoff between the certainty and severity of punishment; the choice between ex ante and ex post sanctions; negligence versus strict more »
This course will provide a broad overview of the scholarly field known as "law and economics." The focus will be on how legal rules and institutions can correct market failures. We will discuss the economic function of contracts and, when contracts fail or are not feasible, the role of legal remedies to resolve disputes. We will also discuss at some length the choice between encouraging private parties to initiate legal actions to correct externalities and governmental actors, such as regulatory authorities. Extensive attention will be given to the economics of litigation, and to how private incentives to bring lawsuits differ from the social value of litigation. The economic motive to commit crimes, and the optimal governmental response to crime, will be studied in depth. Specific topics within the preceding broad themes include: the Coase Theorem; the tradeoff between the certainty and severity of punishment; the choice between ex ante and ex post sanctions; negligence versus strict liability; property rules; remedies for breach of contract; and the American rule versus the English rule for allocating litigation costs. There is no formal economics prerequisite to take this course, though some prior training in economics will be helpful. Elements used in grading: Final exam (open-book) plus three short take-home problems during the quarter. Cross-listed with Public Policy ( PUBLPOL 302B). (For students interested in a shorter introduction to economic analysis of law, see Law 7503, "Introduction to Law and Economics," which is a one-unit course also offered during the winter quarter that is graded on a mandatory pass-fail basis.)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Polinsky, A. (PI)

LAW 7503: Introduction to Law and Economics

This course will introduce students to the "law and economics" way of thinking about the legal system. It is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior training in economics and who are unlikely to take more advanced courses in the field (such as the 3 unit Law 7502, "Economic Analysis of Law"). This class will meet for six 1.5 hour sessions during the first part of the quarter. We will focus on the core bodies of law taught to first-year law students: tort law, contract law, property law, criminal law, and civil procedure. For each of these bodies of law, the economic approach will be described in non-technical terms and then this approach will be used to examine a key case or key issue within that body of law. First-year law students are especially welcome in this course. There are no prerequisites to take this course. Elements used in grading: Two short take-home exercises (graded on a mandatory pass-fail basis).
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Polinsky, A. (PI)

LAW 7504: Introduction to Organizational Behavior

(Formerly Law 327) Why do firms exist? Is their sustained success in markets possible? How do leaders choose and execute on a strategy? What should the role of firms be in society? This course will meet once a week to discuss these questions and others about business enterprise. Each week we will focus on interesting and engaging case studies that illustrate key components of strategic management in firms in the U.S. and abroad. The course is designed to be highly interactive, and the principles taught during this course can help students prepare for careers in which they will need to employ strategic thinking. Due to the interactive nature of the course, attendance and in-class participation are graded components. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Last offered: Winter 2017

LAW 7505: Law and Economics of the Death Penalty Seminar

(Formerly Law 397) This seminar will examine the legal and policy aspects of a capital punishment regime, with a focus on three primary issues: 1) the Supreme Court's forty-year effort to define what cases can permissibly receive the death penalty and the procedures under which it must be imposed; 2) the arguments for and against the death penalty, with a major focus on whether the death penalty deters, is administered in a racially biased way, or is otherwise implemented in an arbitrary and capricious manner; and 3) what the U.S. and international status of the death penalty is today and what the prospects are for the future in the wake of Justice Breyer's invitation in June 2015 to the Court to rule on the constitutionality of capital punishment in light of the existing empirical evidence. The principle text in the class will be Steiker and Steiker, Courting Death: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment. Although the readings on deterrence and racial discrimination will entail som more »
(Formerly Law 397) This seminar will examine the legal and policy aspects of a capital punishment regime, with a focus on three primary issues: 1) the Supreme Court's forty-year effort to define what cases can permissibly receive the death penalty and the procedures under which it must be imposed; 2) the arguments for and against the death penalty, with a major focus on whether the death penalty deters, is administered in a racially biased way, or is otherwise implemented in an arbitrary and capricious manner; and 3) what the U.S. and international status of the death penalty is today and what the prospects are for the future in the wake of Justice Breyer's invitation in June 2015 to the Court to rule on the constitutionality of capital punishment in light of the existing empirical evidence. The principle text in the class will be Steiker and Steiker, Courting Death: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment. Although the readings on deterrence and racial discrimination will entail some substantial statistical analysis, a background in statistics, though helpful, will not be required. Special Instructions: After the term begins, students can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length. Elements used in grading seminar: attendance, class participation, short response papers, and final paper or approved research with the professor.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

LAW 7506: Law and Economics Seminar I

This seminar will examine current research by lawyers and economists on a variety of topics in law and economics. Several sessions of the seminar will consist of an invited speaker, usually from another university, who will discuss his or her current research. Representative of these sessions have been discussions of compensation for government regulations and takings, liability rules for controlling accidents, the definition of markets in antitrust analysis, the role of the government as a controlling shareholder, and optimal drug patent length. Special Instructions: You may write a series of short commentaries on the guest speakers' papers, of which there will be four. Students electing this option will be graded on a Mandatory Pass/Restricted Credit/Fail basis and receive 2 units of credit. Alternatively, you may write a single research paper on a law and economics topic of your choice. This will satisfy the Law School's Research requirement. These papers will be graded on an Honors more »
This seminar will examine current research by lawyers and economists on a variety of topics in law and economics. Several sessions of the seminar will consist of an invited speaker, usually from another university, who will discuss his or her current research. Representative of these sessions have been discussions of compensation for government regulations and takings, liability rules for controlling accidents, the definition of markets in antitrust analysis, the role of the government as a controlling shareholder, and optimal drug patent length. Special Instructions: You may write a series of short commentaries on the guest speakers' papers, of which there will be four. Students electing this option will be graded on a Mandatory Pass/Restricted Credit/Fail basis and receive 2 units of credit. Alternatively, you may write a single research paper on a law and economics topic of your choice. This will satisfy the Law School's Research requirement. These papers will be graded on an Honors/Pass/Restricted Credit/Fail basis. (You may write a single longer paper for two quarters if you enroll in the Seminar in the Winter as well.) Students taking the seminar for R credit can take the seminar for either 2 or 3 units of credit, depending on the paper length. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. There is no formal economics prerequisite to take this seminar, though students doing the longer research papers typically have some prior training in economics. Students may take both Law and Economics Seminar I and Law and Economics Seminar II in either order (neither is a prerequisite for the other). This seminar is cross-listed with the Economics Department (same as Econ 354). Elements used in grading: Four commentaries or one research paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Polinsky, A. (PI)

LAW 7507: Law and Economics Seminar II

(Formerly Law 344) This seminar will examine current research by lawyers and economists on a variety of topics in law and economics. Several sessions of the seminar will consist of an invited speaker, usually from another university, who will discuss his or her current research. Representative of these sessions have been discussions of compensation for government regulations and takings, liability rules for controlling accidents, the definition of markets in antitrust analysis, the role of the government as a controlling shareholder, and optimal drug patent length. Special Instructions: You may write a series of short commentaries on the guest speakers' papers, of which there will be four. Students electing this option will be graded on a Mandatory Pass/Restricted Credit/Fail basis and receive 2 units of credit. Alternatively, you may write a single research paper on a law and economics topic of your choice. This will satisfy the Law School's Research requirement. These papers will be more »
(Formerly Law 344) This seminar will examine current research by lawyers and economists on a variety of topics in law and economics. Several sessions of the seminar will consist of an invited speaker, usually from another university, who will discuss his or her current research. Representative of these sessions have been discussions of compensation for government regulations and takings, liability rules for controlling accidents, the definition of markets in antitrust analysis, the role of the government as a controlling shareholder, and optimal drug patent length. Special Instructions: You may write a series of short commentaries on the guest speakers' papers, of which there will be four. Students electing this option will be graded on a Mandatory Pass/Restricted Credit/Fail basis and receive 2 units of credit. Alternatively, you may write a single research paper on a law and economics topic of your choice. This will satisfy the Law School's Research requirement. These papers will be graded on an Honors/Pass/Restricted Credit/Fail basis. (You may write a single longer paper for two quarters if you enroll in the Seminar in the Autumn as well.) Students taking the seminar for R credit can take the seminar for either 2 or 3 units of credit, depending on the paper length. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. There is no formal economics prerequisite to take this seminar, though students doing the longer research papers typically have some prior training in economics. Students may take both Law and Economics Seminar I and Law and Economics Seminar II in either order (neither is a prerequisite for the other). Elements used in grading: Four commentaries or one research paper. Cross-listed with Economics ( ECON 354). CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LAW 7508: Problem Solving and Decision Making for Public Policy and Social Change

Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems--in areas such as education, health, energy, and domestic and global poverty--that call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles, covering topics such as designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; and methods for influencing behavior. You will work in teams to apply these concepts and tools to actual problems, with teams choosing whatever problem interests them. To address the problems, you will do a mixture of online research and ethnographic field work. To facilitate the ethnography, it is preferable to choose a problem that occurs on campus or nearby, such as bike safety; electric scooter safety; food waste; free speech and p more »
Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems--in areas such as education, health, energy, and domestic and global poverty--that call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles, covering topics such as designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; and methods for influencing behavior. You will work in teams to apply these concepts and tools to actual problems, with teams choosing whatever problem interests them. To address the problems, you will do a mixture of online research and ethnographic field work. To facilitate the ethnography, it is preferable to choose a problem that occurs on campus or nearby, such as bike safety; electric scooter safety; food waste; free speech and protection from harmful speech; other issues of diversity and inclusion; problems faced by first generation students, disabled students, or other groups of students; stress; alcohol and cannabis use; smoking and vaping. The course may be of interest to students in Law and Policy Lab practicums who wish to broaden their policy analysis skills. The class is limited to 32 students, with priority given to students who register on or before the last day of the autumn quarter in the following order: Law School, MPP program, Sustainability Science and Practice Program, IPS program. After that date, any remaining places will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Students other than law students must seek the consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

LAW 7510: Research Design for Empirical Legal Studies

Empirical legal studies have become popular in the U.S. and are now spreading to non-U.S. law faculties as well. Usually the term applies to analyses of quantitative data and the researcher relies on data collected by others. But the term "empirical" properly encompasses both qualitative and quantitative data, including interviews, legal documents, survey research and experimental results. Analysts interested in using such data need to understand how they were collected, in order to decide what data can appropriately be used to answer different kinds of questions. Often to answer the questions of interest, a researcher needs to collect new data, which poses challenging questions about how to design an empirical research study. Answering these questions appropriately is important to ensure publication in a peer-reviewed journal, which is becoming increasingly important to legal academia. This seminar will introduce students to the wide range of research methods that can be used to answe more »
Empirical legal studies have become popular in the U.S. and are now spreading to non-U.S. law faculties as well. Usually the term applies to analyses of quantitative data and the researcher relies on data collected by others. But the term "empirical" properly encompasses both qualitative and quantitative data, including interviews, legal documents, survey research and experimental results. Analysts interested in using such data need to understand how they were collected, in order to decide what data can appropriately be used to answer different kinds of questions. Often to answer the questions of interest, a researcher needs to collect new data, which poses challenging questions about how to design an empirical research study. Answering these questions appropriately is important to ensure publication in a peer-reviewed journal, which is becoming increasingly important to legal academia. This seminar will introduce students to the wide range of research methods that can be used to answer empirical questions, provide a framework for choosing among methods, and explain how to use the methods. The project for the quarter is to design an empirical research study on a topic of your choice. Special Instructions: JD students can take the class for 3-4 units. SPILS students must take this class for 4 units. Students taking the course for 4 units must attend the additional session on Thursday, which is optional for others. After the term begins, JD students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which can potentially satisfy the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Consent Application for JD students: To apply for this course, JD students must e-mail the instructors for permission to enroll. This course is REQUIRED for all SPILS fellows and BY CONSENT for all other students. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, class presentation, written assignments and final paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
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